Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Certainly one of the things that resonates to me about the series is the effects, both short and long term, on the culture of not being able to trust *any* sources of information. To that extent Trump's villification of the news is relevant and not a particularly partisan issue. Increasingly, in my observation, everyone (people on left and right) are suspicious of sources of information, not just the usual, partisan suspects.
  3. In 2015, I did a "feel better" movies segment: http://1morefilmblog.com/2015/11/15/feel-better-movies-what-to-watch-when-the-news-is-bleak/ http://1morefilmblog.com/2015/11/28/feel-better-movies-josh-wartels-list/ http://1morefilmblog.com/2015/12/01/feel-better-movies-rachel-daviss-list/ http://1morefilmblog.com/2015/11/21/feel-better-movies-evan-cogswells-list/ I've been feeling a bit overwhelmed by transition to online instruction in the middle of the semester, so it's been hard to watch anything heavy or long...I still haven't watched Poetry. Been wanting to watch some things that are commercial but comforting...and had a surprising hunkering for musicals...just because singing alone gives one uplift in spirits.
  4. Being a free lance writer and with one book already on Amazon, I am now working on second book. Hopefully I will to write for a film movie maker if it was possible. In dark times of Cornuvus 19 all over our countries . Lock down does not mean shut down we move on and support each other in different ways the best way love peace and wisdom.
  5. Andrew

    Corpus Christi

    Has anyone else seen this? It scored a Best Foreign Language Feature nomination this year, which is prompting its release in arthouse cinemas stateside. Jessica and I watched it last night and enjoyed it considerably. I think its themes would resonate quite strongly for a lot of folks here, and visually, I thought it was quite accomplished. Anywho, here's my full review: https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/2020/03/corpus-christi-it-takes-a-fake-priest-to-uncover-real-secrets/
  6. So I'm thinking of writing a column about ways to enjoy art in general while stuck at home. To that end, and for my own personal nourishment, I thought I'd ask folks here what their favorites have been. Personally, I'm grateful that a couple of Asheville arthouse cinemas - the Fine Arts Theatre and the Grail Moviehouse are offering ways to enjoy streaming films that they'd have otherwise been screening. I'm also aware that Yo-Yo Ma is posting short solo performances on social media, while the Metropolitan Opera is allowing free viewings of performances online.
  7. Good idea! Over this past 1+ month, I've been nourished by watching or re-watching candidates for my Top 25 list. Not all of these made my list, but highlights have included A Man Escaped, lots of Dardennes, 2001, The Searchers, Haxan, The Passion of Joan of Arc, The Seventh Seal, and Day of Wrath. Now it's on to current films to stream at home and potentially review. Since sheltering in place, I've been keeping a running list of candidates. Last night, it was Corpus Christi; tonight, Platform. Oh, and Jessica and I just finished the first season of Star Trek: Picard last night. What a delight!
  8. A search on "Bernard Tavernier" pulled up this thread, and I thought it might be timely to pull it back to the top and see if anyone else wants to feed it during the pandemic. As mentioned last night on Twitter, I have the Koker Trilogy waiting for me - my second time checking it out from the library (yes, some of us still watch DVDs primarily, rather than stream) after not starting it during my previous checkout. I grabbed it again as COVID-19 began to spread, believing the library might close and I might be able to hang on to it for an extended period of time, rather than the usual one-week checkout period. That was the right decision, although I've put off my viewing again; last night I read a book on the couch and then didn't feel up to starting the first film in the trilogy after 10 p.m. Maybe later today?
  9. BethR

    Emma.

    Tom and Lorenzo further analyze the film’s use of color, costumes, and sets.
  10. I just added your films to the master list, Andrew. I was starting to worry that we might end up with too many nominations, but now that nine people have submitted lists, some consensus is starting to form.
  11. Last week
  12. I'd vote for best, considering I'm reading Stephen King's The Stand for the first time since my adolescence, because 1) it's about all my attention span can manage, and 2) there's something cathartic about sublimating fears into an even worse-case scenario. I don't say any of this to get into a political dispute, but the facts that Trump's approval rating reportedly stands at about 52%, and that the Dems are leaning towards Biden over Bernie (as the New York Times put it, restoration over revolution) suggest a more pessimistic short-term view.
  13. Just sent my list. The breakdown by decade for me: 1920s - 1 1940s - 1 1950s - 4 1960s - 4 1970s - 1 1980s - 2 1990s - 1 2000s - 4 2010 - 7 I'm eagerly looking forward to April 2nd...
  14. I am admittedly wrestling with whether now is the best or worst possible moment to finally getting around to HBO's Chernobyl. It is devastating on so many levels, but most particularly the blunt illustrations of how the failures of systems are borne by individuals, and usually not the ones with the most invested in the system or the biggest hand in making them that way. Neither is the series about "heroes" in the face of circumstance, unlikely or not. The guys that swim under the reactor to hand turn the pumps do so because, as the autocrat says, it must be done, and they are the only ones who can do it. And yet, if the series can be believed we came within 48 hours of half a continent being uninhabitable for thousands of years. There is something both horrible and familiar (horribly familiar) about how the doers at all class levels have learned to ignore the "leaders" either by work around (the scientist speak in code on the phone, talking about nieces and nephews of a certain age so that the initials and ages correspond to chemical elements) or simply speaking to each other directly. ("If those things worked," a miner says of protective masks, "you'd be wearing them.") Even so, the human cost is unfathomable since, given time, that is the only resource to be thrown at the catastrophe. And each lie increases the death toll, and yet some must lie to stay alive long enough to keep even more from dying. If, like me, you look around at some recent disaster and wonder, "Will this be enough to change us?" How close must we get to the edge before we turn around? And if, like me, on your darkest days, you think, no, we'll never turn around of our own volition, perhaps things that break systems are lust horrible, painful events that force us, in some small degree, to do what we know we should but can't bring ourselves to by strength of our fallen will, then this series will most likely resonate with you.
  15. I don't agree with Andrew's assessment of Mija; I think she's a highly pitiable character to be sure, but she's a mild mannered, somewhat naive woman who suffers a complete mental breakdown--both due to the early stage Alzheimer's and the shock of her grandson's actions. The scene when she learns about the repeated gang rape with the callous, sexist fathers worrying about their sons' (and their own) reputations is phenomenal acting from Jeong-hie Yun as Mija attempts to process something that was previously unfathomable to her. And the rest of the movie is her attempt to process that information and see the world from another perspective (ultimately that of Heejin), and the poems serve as the bridge for her to get there. The scenes with her grandson are a sort of five stages of grief--anger in waking him up in the middle of the night, denial with the babying of him. I still don't know what to make of the tragedy of the ending (that she could only accept what happened by putting herself completely in Heejin's shoes), specifically whether the film views Mija's final act as some sort of triumph or failure.
  16. Joel Mayward

    Vagabond

    There's an interesting chapter in a book on post-secular cinema, Immanent Frames (edited by John Caruana and Mark Cauchi), which juxtaposes Bresson's Mouchette, Varda's Vagabond, and the Dardennes' Rosetta, exploring the tragic depiction of young women in relation with one another. Some of the author's interpretations are a stretch, but there's something thematically linking these Single Word-Titled Films About Young Women Fighting To Survive Being Exploited In An Unjust Economic System. (You could include Loden's Wanda here too.)
  17. Overstreet

    Vagabond

    I thought this tree/foliage motif became a bit heavy-handed — particularly in the character of the professor who is only academically interested in researching the disease in the plane trees, but not interested in committing herself to finding a cure. She is happy to let Mona ride around in her car and live off of her handouts. She even says Mona has "taken root" in her car. But she's not committed to her. She doesn't love her. She's fascinated by her as an observer (much as Varda seems to be, by the way, with the dread-locked street youth in Gleaners, so maybe this is a self-critique). Also, the disease that is killing the plane trees is loudly identified as coming from America, which underlines the film's other indications that people are valuing Mona according to her productivity, her ability to get work done or earn them money, either as a potato farmer or as a prostitute. By the way, I always love a good opportunity to join a conversation that hasn't moved in... eight years! This has been on my must-see list for a long time, particularly since filmmaker Paul Harrill raved about it for a long time over dinner one night in Grand Rapids. If I recall correctly, it's his favorite Varda, and a pivotal film for him in becoming a filmmaker.
  18. I realized somewhere in between Andrew bumping A Man for All Seasons and bumping this thread, that I fully expect dissertations and/or anthologies within 2 years or less, about film/books in the age of pandemic. The first thing I thought of when reading this response is how the film deals with the theme of inter-generational conflict and responsibilities...the duties (if any) of children to their parents. Certainly the film seems topical at a social moment when those over 60 are at greatest risk and we are all being socially isolated from one another. How we conceptualize family and duty is very much on everyone's mind.
  19. I finally got around to watching this the other night after hearing about it for years from @Gareth Higgins. Wow. What a stunning and beautiful film. When it ended, my girlfriend was in tears of sorrow and anger at how Bark and Lucy's children treated them and the fact that they would likely never see each other again. I was in tears because of the fullness of their love and the desire that I, too, might live a full life. I'm not sure I've ever seen a film that feels both ice cold and incredibly warm at the same time, at least not to this extent.
  20. They still post a lot of reviews of new releases, but not as many. I suspect they're a smaller operation these days. I should check in with Thom.
  21. Thanks for your diligent work on this, Ken!
  22. The 2011 List is now done via the app: http://artsandfaith.com/index.php?/films/year/4-2011-top-100/ I don't expect anyone to delete old links, and I realize some don't like the layout or look as much as the old Image-branded pages, but I would count it a courtesy if links to the list go here. It's important to get as many of the lists and Ecumenical Jury lists in one place for archiving since we have no control over other sites, and that's really one of the main reasons I acquired the site. It seems like from recent threads that archival preservation is important to a lot of people, so I think, eventually, this app will be nice at having the lists easy to navigate. Plus each one has a direct link to the discussion thread (if there is one).
  23. Darren H

    Heartbeat Detector

    Holy shit! (Am I allowed to say shit on this forum? Because holy shit!)
  24. M. Leary

    Heartbeat Detector

    Free on Prime! I will give it another go, as your radar has always served me well.
  25. Darren H

    Heartbeat Detector

    How did you see Low Life? I was totally mesmerized by it and am eager to see it again but didn't realize it was available anywhere?
  26. M. Leary

    Heartbeat Detector

    Darren, how has Klotz's work held up for you? Low Life just did not click for me.
  27. M. Leary

    Heartbeat Detector

    I really love Le Livre D'Image, and keep returning to it. So fascinating that he is still producing art at that level. Notre Musique is the kind of film that makes me want to teach some kind of film class some day. All the 60s and 80s work remains compelling. But the shock of In Praise of Love abides, and still feels like an apex of his work. All the language games and editing puzzles take us somewhere sensitive and totally human. I guess it even hits transcendence a few times, which is not something I ever expect or even look for in Godard.
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...