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The Man Who Planted Trees


  1. Directed by: Frédéric Back
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by: Jean Giono
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 1987
  8. Running Time: 30
  9. Language: English, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

This beautifully animated short film begins in 1913 in the deserted and desertified foothills of the Alps in southern France, where the narrator, on a hiking excursion, meets the peasant Elzéar Bouffier, who offers him hospitality. The film follows their interactions over the decades as the narrator grows from youth to middle age and Bouffier from middle age to elderhood. Having lost his family, Bouffier decides to dedicate the rest of his life to reforesting the desolate and desperate region, one acorn at a time. As the selfless work of Bouffier’s hands becomes established, it eventually transforms the region into a place of beauty, hope, verdant growth, and prosperity. The fulfillment of the work of old age is a lasting fruitfulness. The Man Who Planted Trees is an inspiring study of the profound outcomes—social renewal, replenished land, personal wisdom and happiness—made possible by a vocation of decisive commitment to, as the narrator calls it, “a task worthy of God.” The film portrays, as the narrator implies, what it looks like when a person partners with God in the practice of resurrection. This suggests that aging is not only a movement toward death but can also be a movement in hope toward new life. -- Robert Zandstra.

 


  1. Directed by: Frédéric Back
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by: Jean Giono
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 1987
  8. Running Time: 30
  9. Language: English, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

This beautifully animated short film begins in 1913 in the deserted and desertified foothills of the Alps in southern France, where the narrator, on a hiking excursion, meets the peasant Elzéar Bouffier, who offers him hospitality. The film follows their interactions over the decades as the narrator grows from youth to middle age and Bouffier from middle age to elderhood. Having lost his family, Bouffier decides to dedicate the rest of his life to reforesting the desolate and desperate region, one acorn at a time. As the selfless work of Bouffier’s hands becomes established, it eventually transforms the region into a place of beauty, hope, verdant growth, and prosperity. The fulfillment of the work of old age is a lasting fruitfulness. The Man Who Planted Trees is an inspiring study of the profound outcomes—social renewal, replenished land, personal wisdom and happiness—made possible by a vocation of decisive commitment to, as the narrator calls it, “a task worthy of God.” The film portrays, as the narrator implies, what it looks like when a person partners with God in the practice of resurrection. This suggests that aging is not only a movement toward death but can also be a movement in hope toward new life. -- Robert Zandstra.

 

This beautifully animated short film begins in 1913 in the deserted and desertified foothills of the Alps in southern France, where the narrator, on a hiking excursion, meets the peasant Elzéar Bouffier, who offers him hospitality. The film follows their interactions over the decades as the narrator grows from youth to middle age and Bouffier from middle age to elderhood. Having lost his family, Bouffier decides to dedicate the rest of his life to reforesting the desolate and desperate region, one acorn at a time. As the selfless work of Bouffier’s hands becomes established, it eventually transforms the region into a place of beauty, hope, verdant growth, and prosperity. The fulfillment of the work of old age is a lasting fruitfulness. The Man Who Planted Trees is an inspiring study of the profound outcomes—social renewal, replenished land, personal wisdom and happiness—made possible by a vocation of decisive commitment to, as the narrator calls it, “a task worthy of God.” The film portrays, as the narrator implies, what it looks like when a person partners with God in the practice of resurrection. This suggests that aging is not only a movement toward death but can also be a movement in hope toward new life. -- Robert Zandstra.

 


  1. Directed by: Frédéric Back
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by: Jean Giono
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 1987
  8. Running Time: 30
  9. Language: English, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix
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