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Stromboli


  1. Directed by: Roberto Rossellini
  2. Produced by: Roberto Rossellini
  3. Written by: Roberto Rossellini
    Félix Morlión
    Renzo Cesana
    Art Cohn
    Gian Paolo Callegari
    Sergio Amidei
  4. Music by: Renzo Rossellini
  5. Cinematography by: Otello Martelli
  6. Editing by: Roland Gross
  7. Release Date: 1950
  8. Running Time: 107
  9. Language: Italian, English, Spanish, German, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

In the second Rossellini/Bergman collaboration on this list, a WWII refugee (Ingrid Bergman) breaks free from an internment camp by marrying a young Italian fisherman (Mario Vitale), but finds herself trapped as soon as they return to his ancestral home—a Sicilian island that hosts a live volcano. Roberto Rossellini directs with an ascetic fervor that charges the simple storyline with cosmic significance. The stark, terrible beauty of the setting throws the concept of marriage into sharp relief, offering a stage for one of the most striking conclusions in ‘40s cinema. – Nathaniel Bell


  1. Directed by: Roberto Rossellini
  2. Produced by: Roberto Rossellini
  3. Written by: Roberto Rossellini
    Félix Morlión
    Renzo Cesana
    Art Cohn
    Gian Paolo Callegari
    Sergio Amidei
  4. Music by: Renzo Rossellini
  5. Cinematography by: Otello Martelli
  6. Editing by: Roland Gross
  7. Release Date: 1950
  8. Running Time: 107
  9. Language: Italian, English, Spanish, German, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

In the second Rossellini/Bergman collaboration on this list, a WWII refugee (Ingrid Bergman) breaks free from an internment camp by marrying a young Italian fisherman (Mario Vitale), but finds herself trapped as soon as they return to his ancestral home—a Sicilian island that hosts a live volcano. Roberto Rossellini directs with an ascetic fervor that charges the simple storyline with cosmic significance. The stark, terrible beauty of the setting throws the concept of marriage into sharp relief, offering a stage for one of the most striking conclusions in ‘40s cinema. – Nathaniel Bell

In the second Rossellini/Bergman collaboration on this list, a WWII refugee (Ingrid Bergman) breaks free from an internment camp by marrying a young Italian fisherman (Mario Vitale), but finds herself trapped as soon as they return to his ancestral home—a Sicilian island that hosts a live volcano. Roberto Rossellini directs with an ascetic fervor that charges the simple storyline with cosmic significance. The stark, terrible beauty of the setting throws the concept of marriage into sharp relief, offering a stage for one of the most striking conclusions in ‘40s cinema. – Nathaniel Bell


  1. Directed by: Roberto Rossellini
  2. Produced by: Roberto Rossellini
  3. Written by: Roberto Rossellini
    Félix Morlión
    Renzo Cesana
    Art Cohn
    Gian Paolo Callegari
    Sergio Amidei
  4. Music by: Renzo Rossellini
  5. Cinematography by: Otello Martelli
  6. Editing by: Roland Gross
  7. Release Date: 1950
  8. Running Time: 107
  9. Language: Italian, English, Spanish, German, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix
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