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Cleo from 5 to 7


  1. Directed by: Agnès Varda
  2. Produced by: Georges de Beauregard
    Carlo Ponti
  3. Written by: Agnès Varda
  4. Music by: Michel Legrand
  5. Cinematography by: Paul Bonis
    Alain Levent
    Jean Rabier
  6. Editing by: Pascale Laverrière
    Janine Verneau
  7. Release Date: 1962
  8. Running Time: 90
  9. Language: French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

In this early Varda film, Cleo is hooked on her own reflection. She is constantly looking in mirrors, window reflections, and ensuring her well-manicured presentation is in order. But something dramatic happens in our two late afternoon hours with Cleo, during which she is waiting to hear the results of a test for stomach cancer. After a series of encounters revealing how shallow her life is, Cleo tears a perfectly coiffed wig from her head and spends the remainder of the film in an iconic parable of self-discovery. In a dramatic subjective movement of Varda’s camera, we begin to see a new Paris through Cleo’s eyes. The mirrors give way to conversations. Cleo’s mortal fear becomes a pathway to a new way of seeing and self-awareness. This is all one of cinema’s great reflections on beauty, identity, and wholeness.

—Michael Leary


  1. Directed by: Agnès Varda
  2. Produced by: Georges de Beauregard
    Carlo Ponti
  3. Written by: Agnès Varda
  4. Music by: Michel Legrand
  5. Cinematography by: Paul Bonis
    Alain Levent
    Jean Rabier
  6. Editing by: Pascale Laverrière
    Janine Verneau
  7. Release Date: 1962
  8. Running Time: 90
  9. Language: French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

In this early Varda film, Cleo is hooked on her own reflection. She is constantly looking in mirrors, window reflections, and ensuring her well-manicured presentation is in order. But something dramatic happens in our two late afternoon hours with Cleo, during which she is waiting to hear the results of a test for stomach cancer. After a series of encounters revealing how shallow her life is, Cleo tears a perfectly coiffed wig from her head and spends the remainder of the film in an iconic parable of self-discovery. In a dramatic subjective movement of Varda’s camera, we begin to see a new Paris through Cleo’s eyes. The mirrors give way to conversations. Cleo’s mortal fear becomes a pathway to a new way of seeing and self-awareness. This is all one of cinema’s great reflections on beauty, identity, and wholeness.

—Michael Leary

In this early Varda film, Cleo is hooked on her own reflection. She is constantly looking in mirrors, window reflections, and ensuring her well-manicured presentation is in order. But something dramatic happens in our two late afternoon hours with Cleo, during which she is waiting to hear the results of a test for stomach cancer. After a series of encounters revealing how shallow her life is, Cleo tears a perfectly coiffed wig from her head and spends the remainder of the film in an iconic parable of self-discovery. In a dramatic subjective movement of Varda’s camera, we begin to see a new Paris through Cleo’s eyes. The mirrors give way to conversations. Cleo’s mortal fear becomes a pathway to a new way of seeing and self-awareness. This is all one of cinema’s great reflections on beauty, identity, and wholeness.

—Michael Leary


  1. Directed by: Agnès Varda
  2. Produced by: Georges de Beauregard
    Carlo Ponti
  3. Written by: Agnès Varda
  4. Music by: Michel Legrand
  5. Cinematography by: Paul Bonis
    Alain Levent
    Jean Rabier
  6. Editing by: Pascale Laverrière
    Janine Verneau
  7. Release Date: 1962
  8. Running Time: 90
  9. Language: French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix
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