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ruthie

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    105
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About ruthie

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 09/04/1983

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Profile Information

  • Location
    The Bay Area, CA

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Math and Physics instructor
  • Favorite movies
    Children of Heaven Lost in Translation Blue Labyrinth Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind The Seventh Seal The Return and (let's be honest) Little Women
  • Favorite music
    Over the Rhine, Josh Ritter, Hem, Sufjan Stevens, Sigur Ros, Emiliana Torrini, Gillian Welch... Tchaicovsky (the wonders of Swan Lake in the Bolshoi), Rachmonanov, Scriabin, Poulenc, Nigel Kennedy's recording of Bruch, Brahms, and Mendelssohn concertos, Chopin...
  • Favorite creative writing
    Wallace Stegner - Angle of Repose, Crossing to Safety John Steinbeck - Grapes of Wrath, Travels with Charlie, East of Eden, etc. Graham Greene - The Power and the Glory Zora Neale Hurston - Their Eyes Were Watching God Michael Bulgakov - The Master and Margarita Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov Douglas R. Hofstadter - Godel, Escher, Bach
  • Favorite visual art
    sculpture is the favorite medium, people the favorite subject - Houdin is one of the artists that sticks out wood turning - my dad pottery - my mom
  1. Housekeeping was made into a movie?! I had no idea! ... I'm going to have to look into that. Back to the topic. A number of alien movies are small-town themed. They seem to be idea for para-normal experiences...or perhaps small towns were a nice divergence to the classic War of the Worlds theme "big scary aliens completely destroy the densely-populated city". *Signs *ET *Close Encounters of the Third Kind (I think that Muncie, IN counts as small-town. It might be a college town, but it certainly has a small-town mentality, and it's completely surrounded by fields...and to think I used to live 31 miles outside Muncie...)
  2. Beautiful songs

    There is a choral setting of the "Agnus Dei" to Samuel Berber's Adagio for Strings. The average to good choir gets strained and off-pitch in the first 30 seconds (which is still the first note), but when sung by a great pure-toned choir, ahh.... You can also find a good Cambridge recording on Trinity Choir's Voce album.
  3. Aradhna -- Amrit Vani

    Aradhna came and played at my university several years ago during my senior year. Unfortunately, they were trying to set up for their concert on the same stage that we were trying to do our production week opera rehearsal. We were all a little stressed our mutual need for the same space. We made a funny scene: us in full make-up, character shoes and 19th-century Italian fluffy dresses and gondolier outfits, ready to sing boisterous high notes juxtaposed with these natural musicians, sitting on rugs in their kurtas and playing quietly meditative music. In any case, our conflict made the whole opera company sit down and listen to them warm up and sound check for about an hour or so. It was a wonderfully refreshing hour of forced rest. I've always meant to look up Aradhna again. Thanks for the reminder!
  4. Cadaver Calculator

    Yeay, I beat Christian by $100! Apparently, I am a slightly more collectible commodity...sorry, Christian. While the answer to how much you're worth is encouraging, the questions do not lead one to good self-criticism and are pretty relative. What body build do I have: average, how much over (or under) average do I need to be to be "slim"? How much muscle do I need to have to be "atheletic"? Exactly how tall do I need to be to go from "taller than average" to "tall" to "extremely tall/giantism"?
  5. French music

    I've had several wonderful moments with Carla Bruni and her Quelqu'un M'a Dit album...for example, a rainy trainride through Oregon's Willamette valley. I understand French in music about 65%, I'd say...enough to enjoy listening to it and get a jest, but not enough to vouch for my lyrical taste. I enjoyed her voice and the way that she was recorded which made her sound so intimate.
  6. True Art or Fake?

    I was just laughing at the concept of comparing them. You can definitely see form differences in the Pollock vs. bird quiz. One is obviously unconciously splattered while the other is, like I said above, pursuing an idea...another unfortunate give-away is the Edit: Thanks nardis...
  7. True Art or Fake?

    But the final question is pretty tough - had I not known about his work, I would probably have answered incorrectly. But on the last one, there was a refined-ness about it that would indicate its artsy-ness. For most of the actual art pieces in this quiz, I saw a refined sense or an essence of the contempory art ethos that gave them away. I'm really not trying to be a smartypants; I'm not an art connesiour. I definitely saw recognizable style in the actual art pieces. While it is easy to tease about the simplicity of some modern art, it is often a proccess of chasing the expression of an idea. While the technique used in modern art may not be all that different from scribbles or drippings, one can recognize which ones are art because something in the driving idea has refined them into something more.... ...or something.
  8. True Art or Fake?

    There is, actually, some interesting research done on Jackson Pollock and fractals. If only one could mathematically analyze the pictures while taking the quiz...then it would be a breeze!
  9. True Art or Fake?

    I personally liked the Pollock or bird droppings quiz.
  10. Ian McEwan novels

    Well, as Buckeye has recently recommended Atonement to the Book Club; you could read it and join us there, Jeffrey!
  11. Book Club Returns

    You know, I'd like to be a big and tough reader who is up for hard-core substances like non-fiction (and better yet, theological non-fiction), but sometimes you're just in the mood for fiction, that wonderful gateway reading genre. I'll confess to being with you, nardis. A novel does sound good. Beside, I'm better at discussing fiction.
  12. OH MY GOODNESS! Do I actually get to Ahem Alan?!?!
  13. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

    Although very lengthy, very worthwhile! Having just finished listening (an aural re-"read") to HP&tHBP (#6), I think Granger is very much on the right track here with his alchemical symbolisms. Eh, it's just 'cause he's Hermione's uncle...
  14. Book Club Returns

    I don't know whether to post here or there, but I'm up for it, at least...and maybe we could re-rope your previous takers. Alan, Nardis, Jeff??
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