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Jim Janknegt

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Everything posted by Jim Janknegt

  1. Sorry this is off topic but I went through a Viking phase when I was a kid, I suppose from reading books about them but I don't remember any specific books. We even started a Viking Club in my neighborhood. At the time you could buy these Viking action figures ( although this was before the term action figure), Eric the Red, etc. And whichever action figure Viking you had that was the Viking you were. We had a lot of fun with trashcan lid shields and wooden swords. I envy your Viking helmet. Seems like I am always envious of Andy about something. ): I don't remember reading anything adult until I was in high school. We got to choose a book to read and I picked Tom Wolfe's Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. It blew my mind!
  2. I watched My Kid Could Paint That this weekend My wife has taught elementary school art for many years. I always find kids art amazing. There is a natural sense of design, enthusiasm and freedom that is a joy to behold while it lasts. There is an element to modern art that seeks to re-capture that lost freedom of childhood art making. To not be beholden to subject matter, to freely explore the materials for their own sake, to find joy in pure color, shape and line are hallmarks of both children
  3. Beautiful tomatoes! And a nice photo, I might add.
  4. Jim Janknegt

    In Bruges (2008)

    That's my nagging issue in an otherwise great movie. At first I thought Jimmy was played by Peter Dinklage, but the actor is Jordan Prentice. They sure resemble each other.
  5. Yes. Savonarola is a fascinating person, equal parts religious and political reformer, and he certainly prefigures the Protestant Reformation. I think you're absolutely correct that the Reformation might have taken a very different form, or might have been averted entirely, if history had taken a slightly different turn. In Florence last September my wife and I visited the Monastery of San Marco, best known for the 43 Fra Angelico frescoes that adorn the cell walls (most famously, his Annunciation). What I didn't expect to find was Savonarola's cell, featuring a portrait of the good friar by Fra Bartolommeo. Apparently Savonarola spent eight years at the monastery, which was attacked in 1498 when Savonarola was arrested and forcibly carried away. I note that there is an ongoing dispute (at least as of 1999) within the Catholic Church re: Savonarola's canonization. The Dominicans (of whom Savonarola was a member) are all for it; the Jesuits are against it. More than five hundred years after his death, the man is still controversial. I'm envious... totally green. If I ever get to travel again, Italy is at the top of my list, Florence to be particular and San Marco one of my first stops. When I entered the Catholic Church two years ago I took Beato Angelico as my patron saint. He is one of a few artist to be beatified. I just checked a book about Fra Angelico out of the library yesterday: Fra Angelico : Dissemblance & Figuration by Georges Didi-Huberman ; translated by Jane Marie Todd. I had a chance to read a bit of it this morning and it looks very promising. I'll let you know how it turns out. Yes, by all means (and I realize that the means are sometimes a problem), go. I cannot tell you how meaningful that trip was to me. But I suppose I could try if you're interested. I see a lot of Fra Angelico in your paintings, Jim. In fact, his was the name that came to mind when I viewed your recent painting of Jesus carrying the cross (which was quite wonderful, by the way). The frescoes at San Marco were incredibly moving for several reasons, not the least of which was that the good brother/saint spent several decades of his life creating superb art on walls that were never intended to be viewed by the general public. Not a lot of ego there, which is something that I could stand to emulate. Andy- Thanks for the link to your reminiscences - beautiful. Sounds like the kind of trip I want to take. You know, I would be happy doing what Fra Angelico did. If someone would pay me to paint, day after day, the walls of a monastery, I'd die happy. It would sure beat sitting at this desk like I do all day, every day. I'm not complaining, just thinking out loud.
  6. Yes. Savonarola is a fascinating person, equal parts religious and political reformer, and he certainly prefigures the Protestant Reformation. I think you're absolutely correct that the Reformation might have taken a very different form, or might have been averted entirely, if history had taken a slightly different turn. In Florence last September my wife and I visited the Monastery of San Marco, best known for the 43 Fra Angelico frescoes that adorn the cell walls (most famously, his Annunciation). What I didn't expect to find was Savonarola's cell, featuring a portrait of the good friar by Fra Bartolommeo. Apparently Savonarola spent eight years at the monastery, which was attacked in 1498 when Savonarola was arrested and forcibly carried away. I note that there is an ongoing dispute (at least as of 1999) within the Catholic Church re: Savonarola's canonization. The Dominicans (of whom Savonarola was a member) are all for it; the Jesuits are against it. More than five hundred years after his death, the man is still controversial. I'm envious... totally green. If I ever get to travel again, Italy is at the top of my list, Florence to be particular and San Marco one of my first stops. When I entered the Catholic Church two years ago I took Beato Angelico as my patron saint. He is one of a few artist to be beatified. I just checked a book about Fra Angelico out of the library yesterday: Fra Angelico : Dissemblance & Figuration by Georges Didi-Huberman ; translated by Jane Marie Todd. I had a chance to read a bit of it this morning and it looks very promising. I'll let you know how it turns out.
  7. I just finished reading a book about Savonarola: The Burning of the Vanities: Savonarola and the Borgia Pope by Desmond Seward. I had run across Savonarola before in my Renaissance art history classes. He is usually depicted as a holdover, medieval thug standing in the way of progress and everything glorious and modern. In fact, according to this book he was a godly, Dominican priest, a true prophet, and someone who got into a pissing contest with one of the most corrupt popes the world has ever known, Alexander VI. Off course he lost and was hanged and burned on May 23 1497. One of the most amazing things that occurred as a result of his preaching was the formation of a republic form of government in Florence that lasted for three years until he was executed and the Medici regained control of Florence. Botticelli and Michelangelo were also committed followers of Savonarola although this author contends no significant works of theirs was lost in the bonfire of the vanities as some claim. This is once of those books that points out a hinge of history; if a slightly different path had been taken we would be living in a very different world today. At one junction Savonarola had the ear of the Kind of France, Charles VIII. Savonarola prophesied that the Pope would be overthrown by the king of France and the church reformed. Charles, indeed had the opportunity to call a council and replace Alexander VI but decided not to at the last moment. If he had the Catholic Church could well have been reformed without the upheaval of Luther and Calvin and the Church might well be united today.
  8. Darrel, I like Swanson's work. My guess is that we both have the same influences. Late medieval, early renaissance and american folk art, in my case the New Mexican religious artists. Just a few of my influences. Quite a few of my paintings are already on textweek. Thanks for the reminder though, as I haven't added any paintings there in a while
  9. I'd like to share a couple of new paintings, a diptych actually, although not in the usual configuration. The two paintings are 18"x24" each and are meant to be hung one over the other. In the first painting Jesus carries his cross down an urban street devoid of any other humans or plant life. I intended this to be a metaphor for our consumerist obsessions and our general lack of embracing a sacrificial lifestyle. In the second painting Jesus is shown riding in on his white horse to establish his Kingdom on earth. He is followed by a throng of people and a host of firey angels. 4 other angels are lowering his throne. In a tip of the hat to Edward Hicks I have the animals approaching also from out of the woods. Beneath the current scene you can see the world as we know it destroyed. If you would like to see a larger version of the paintings go here: Jesus Carries His Cross Jesus Rides a White Horse These paintings were done as a commission and are not for sale.
  10. A Good Film Is Hard to Find... you know, like Flannery O'Connor... only different.
  11. That said, I'm liking it even more after the realization. Did anyone else think about this? Or perhaps agree with it now? Good point. It seemed to me the Dr.'s dislike of fiction also created a tension between his poet father and daughter and musician son. Two very different ways of perceiving the world: scientific materialism versus a mythic/poetic viewpoint. I have know the type of person who has no use for fiction, they do not see a need for narrative that gives meaning to life. The facts are apparently sufficient. I am just the opposite; the facts alone do not satisfy which is why I love fiction so much.
  12. My family went to the Chief Drive-in to see Journey to the Center of the Earth (the one with Pat Boone). After playing on the playground waiting for it to get dark we piled into the car to see the movie. I sat up front with my Mom and Dad and my sister sat in the back. When the scene came on where the journeyers realize the path they are walking on was actually dinosaurs I was so startled, I screamed and jumped into the back seat and remained there, crouched down for the rest of the movie. My mother, as a result, refused to let me see any movie that might be considered remotely scary. I never got to see any of the monster movies growing up, like Frankenstein, Wolfman or Dracula. My first not for kids movie (before the rating system I believe) was The Graduate. A bunch of us guys actually paid to get into the drive-in without a car. We sat on the ground with the speaker in the middle of us watching the movie. The scene we were the most looking forward to (the one in the topless bar) was interrupted by the manager who thought we had snuck in. We showed him our tickets and he left us alone but by then the scene was over. We were very disappointed as the rest of the movie was pretty boring to a bunch of adolescents.
  13. John Kelso, a humorous columnist, writes for the Austin American Statesman. His Sunday column was about going with his wife to see Sex in the City. Parts of it are pretty funny. The whole column.
  14. I think I've read every P.D. James detective story featuring Adam Dalgliesh. I think they're some of the best crime fiction around. That being said I couldn't finish Children of Men. While I'm 100% behind the idea of the book the writing was so wooden and didactic I just stopped reading at some point. If you read the Adam Dalgliesh novels start with Cover Her Face and read them in order as the main character changes and grows throughout the series.
  15. I did indeed name my farm, Brilliant Corners ArtFarm, after the Thelonious Monk tune. Monk is my favorite bebop musician and probably my favorite jazz musician in general. I have thought about the title Brilliant Corners a lot. I don't know what Monk was thinking but for me in thinking of a room with brilliant corners it seems like normally the corners are the darkest places in a room. So if the corners are brilliant the whole room must be super lit up. It makes me think of St. John admonishing us to walk in the light as Jesus is the light. For me that's what a good painting does, illuminates... helps us to know more clearly what it is to live as authentic human beings. And thanks for the kind words about my work. I appreciate it.
  16. It sounds like you appreciation of Rothko is from reading about him and from reproductions. If you are so fond of him in reproductions you will be blown away when you finally get to see his paintings in person. The scale of his paintings are very significant. When you stand in front of one at normal viewing range the painting takes in your entire field of vision, including your peripheral vision, which is what Rothko wanted. You are literally enveloped in the painting. And there is no way even the best reproductions can capture the subtlety of his color. I hope you get to see some of his paintings soon!
  17. And Jesus thinks you look like a big eyed kid holding a kitty:
  18. Have you been to the Rothko Chapel in Houston Tx? What was your experience there? Or other Rothkos? There is an excellent segment of Simon Schama's PBS series, The Power of Art, about Rothko. Have you seen it? What did you think?
  19. We expect it to be hot in Texas in the summer but it got really hot, way to soon. We have had at least 12 days over 100 degrees so far. I don't mind sweating but by the time I get home in the evening it is tough to head out into the furnace-like heat to work in the garden. But apparently tomatoes love the heat. So far (I have been weighing) we have harvested over 75 pounds of tomatoes. Last winter I ordered three varieties of tomato seed: Roma, Brandywine and Mortgage Lifter. I started the seeds in ziplock bags hung over our wood stove. We nursed the seedlings along and put them in the ground around March 15th. I staked them up and put bird netting over them and hand picked the stink bugs off the fledgling plants. Around the beginning of June the tomatoes started to come on and they haven't stopped. Man, are they tasty!! And no salmonella!! We have been eating them in salads, on sandwiches and I really like them mixed with cottage cheese, cucumbers, onions and basil (also from our garden). I also made some salsa and my wife is freezing the Romas to use this winter in soups, spaghetti sauce and stews. I am also giving them away at work. In our consumer culture we have largely lost our connection to food. I truly enjoy the authentic experience of growing food. We are trying to grow more and more of what we eat. I am blessed!
  20. Our Men's Book Group in Austin read Devil in the White City last year and everyone liked it. A good portrait of post civil war American hubris in the construction of the worlds fair and astonishing evil in the mass murderer.
  21. Jim Janknegt

    Jesus Anime

    One of the main reasons that Calvin rejected the use of images was his incorrect knowledge of the early Church. From Calvin's Institutes #1 Chapter 11 section 13: We have learned a lot since then, particularly how images were used in the early church. WE have examples as far back as the 2nd century. I was fortunate to get to see an exhibit of Christian art from exactly this time period that Calvin denies exist last spring in Forth Worth. Truly amazing works of art! There is an excellent catalog from the exhibit. The whole idea of a purer church that did not use images doesn't hold water.
  22. My favorite soundtrack, and the only one I have on my iPod, is The Last Tango in Paris. I don't really think of the movie when I listen to it. I find it amazing how so many moods and textures are derived out of the one simple theme.
  23. Lutheran Pastor: Lars and the Real Girl Bishop, St. Nicholas and Euganda Martyrs: Millions
  24. Jim Janknegt

    Jesus Anime

    The idea that we don't know Christ's face is a modern notion. For most of Christendom Christians knew what Jesus looked like. How did they know?-as we all agree there is not physical description of him recorded in the scriptures. The tradition of the church held that there were several images of Jesus classified as acheiropoeta,
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