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Ijiwaru Sensei

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Everything posted by Ijiwaru Sensei

  1. I have forever enjoyed Ed Wood's Plan Nine from Outer Space. It's a classic.
  2. Sure, people stutter, hesitate, use filler sounds and what not, and normal conversation is hardly structured in any formal pre-determined sense, but if I had to listen to people constantly saying "you know," "like," and "I mean," I'd be pulling my hair out. Maybe it's a generational thing, but I'd want to scream, "Put your thoughts together before opening your mouth." My film watching buddy and I often leave the theater and say nothing to each other for a good ten minutes. We are well on the road back home before we start talking about what we've just seen. Does this seem odd? I glanced at the Nixon link. Listening to other's conversations is usually going to be a bit confusing as the people talking often reference shared knowledge and experiences that the listener may not be privy to. And when they switch quickly from unfamiliar topic to unfamiliar topic, the difficulty in following becomes more pronounced. But it seems to me their conversation moves forward and has substantial content, at least for them. Is my OCD showing?
  3. Do your friends really talk that way? Do most recent college graduates?
  4. The original WICKER MAN also had me fooled with this passage, which sounds like OT scripture, but I can't for the life of me find it anywhere; "Hear ye the words of the Lord! Awake ye heathen, and howl! It is the Lord who hath laid waste your orchards. It is he who hath made them bare, because the truth is withered away from the sons of men. Desire shall fail, and ye shall all die accursed!" I
  5. Are Michael Caine's comments here more a critique of American filmmaking or American filmgoers?
  6. I would agree with you if you mean it is too easy to lump all Muslims into a single group, but it is hard to deny that there is a segment within Islam that is dedicated to the violent destruction of the West.
  7. Some other Christ-figures in film: Karl in Sling Blade. Karl is associated with the Bible, a book on carpentry, and a book about Christmas. He is baptized. He eats with outcasts. He sacrifices his own freedom to redeem the Wheatleys. Rosa in Solas. Her unconditional love and continual sacrifice eventually redeems her embittered daughter. Her association with Christ is made explicit at the end of the film with a sustained image of a cross juxtaposed with a tribute to her redeeming grace.
  8. I was asked to read over an essay about Ishiguro because of my (limited) familiarity with Japanese writers; however, I'm having difficulty finding connections between the essay and what I know about Japanese culture. I guess what I am trying to determine is how heavily influenced Ishiguro is by his Japanese heritage. I know he was born in Japan, but he moved with his family to England when he was only 5. How strong are the cultural ties, and do those ties influence his writing? I haven't read Ishiguro, but I've considered him, maybe unfairly, more a British author than Japanese--at least culturally.
  9. Do any of Kazuo Ishiguro's works deal directly or indirectly with Japanese culture? How much influence of Ishiguro's Japanese heritage is displayed in his writings? Any comments would be appreciated.
  10. How would you compare this film to Voices of Iraq, which put cameras into the hands of Iraqi civilians?
  11. Yes, "frayer" is the word I couldn't remember. Thank you. I agree with you that the film is rather flat. I thought, however, that the performance by Siyabonga Shibe, who played James, was exceptional.
  12. Can someone who's seen James' Journey to Jerusalem help jog my memory? Throughout the film James is told, "Don't be a ______." What was it that he was told to avoid being?
  13. Full story here. Well, deleting every piece of dialog between Padme and Anakin would certainly be a good first step.
  14. Many films have protagonists being tempted by another character, but certain films seem to allude directly to Satan's temptation of Christ. What temptation scenes seem to draw explicitly or implicitly from Matthew 4? In Jesus of Montreal, Richard Cardinal holds out a variety of rewards--wealth, fame, material possessions--to Daniel, who is playing Jesus in a Passion play, while both look out over Montreal. Daniel is promised all these things if he will allow Cardinal to represent him. In He Got Game, sports agent Dom Pagnotti tempts Jesus Shuttlesworth by promising him a big NBA contract if he signs a contract to have Pagnotti be his agent. In The Devil's Advocate, John Milton, who turns out to be Satan, tempts Kevin Lomax to join Milton's law firm while, once again, looking out over the city. Others?
  15. I'm sorry if this post is taking the discussion in the wrong direction, but it seems to me that suggestions of the cross and other biblical imagery are often made in superhero films. The recent Superman film has Superman with his arms outstretched before seemingly sacrificing himself to save the world. Spiderman 2 has a scene in which Spiderman sacrifices himself to stop a train with his arms outstretched. Spiderman 2 also presents a none too subtle temptation scene as Doctor Octavius is enticed by his obviously serpentine tentacles. A cross image appears in Matrix: Revolutions as Neo sacrifices himself. The image of Neo with arms outstretched while an ever increasing cross of light appears on his chest suggests his redemptive work. Daredevil has a scene that inverts the cross imagery. Bullseye with stigmata hands outstretched kneels before the Devil in a church begging for mercy. Something more in keeping with the original intent of this thread would be Jesus Shuttlesworth in Spike Lee's He Got Game in which the image below appears briefly.
  16. Another character that fits this discussion would be Billy Bob Thornton
  17. The Rapture (1991) with Mimi Rogers and David Duchovny has a character misquote John 3:16--"For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son that whosoever believeth in his name shall not perish but have everlasting life."
  18. Deleted. Redundant. ::out_cold:: Sorry. I didn't dig deeply enough.
  19. I've only been able to get through the first 100 pages of Murasaki Shikibu's The Tale of Genji, even though it is a foundational work for nearly all Japanese literature. I've also tried on several occasions to read Valentine Cunningham's In the Reading Gaol: Postmodernity, Texts, and History, but I just can't get into it. One of the early posts mentioned Acker's book Catching Light. It is definitely worth reading, but his writing style doesn't seem to hold conciseness in high regard. About halfway through, though, he had me hooked pretty well. He makes many thoughtful observations.
  20. Ijiwaru Sensei

    Amen.

    The Ninth Day has been added to my queue. Thanks for your input.
  21. Ijiwaru Sensei

    Amen.

    Thanks for your patience with the newbie. SDG?
  22. Ijiwaru Sensei

    Amen.

    I was a bit surprised not to find Amen. listed in the top 200 films list. Amen. is a film that I think most Christians would find challenging and thought provoking. The film raises questions about the Christian's response to evil and about what happens when the church becomes more concerned with self-preservation than holding to its principles. The central character is Kurt Gerstein, a devout Lutheran of the Confessing Church, who is also an SS officer. Gerstein is in large part responsible for developing Zyklon-B used to exterminate the Jews. Upon learning about the true purpose of the chemical, Gerstein attempts to alert the world through his church officials and eventually through the Catholic Church only to discover closed doors. It is interesting to note the varied responses characters have throughout the film when confronted with evil--everything from denial of its existence to passive acceptance. The film is in large part not fictional. Kurt Gerstein was a historical figure and almost all of the events surrounding that character in this film are based on historical documents or testimony.
  23. I just started reading Ha Jin's Crazed.
  24. He also gave a reading at the conservative Christian college Cedarville University in April of 2002. Link
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