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Jackie Lent

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About Jackie Lent

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    http://www.reelpowersalons.com

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    view info on website .. http://www. reelpowersalons.com

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    Personal Empowerment Coaching
  1. Jackie Lent

    Funerals on film

    The mere mention of the word "funeral" congers up memories of JFK's procession funeral with Jackie, Caroline and little John John saluting his father. It was the same with Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy and Princess Diana's funerals. I believe that these televised events made an indelible mark on everyone's psyche. Yet for me, the most profound expression of overwhelming loss came in the form of eulogy via a poem by W.H. Auden in Four Weddings and a Funeral. Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone, Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone, Silence the pianos and with muffled drum Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come. Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead, Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves, Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves. He was my North, my South, my East and West, My working week and my Sunday rest, My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song; I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong. The stars are not wanted now: put out every one; Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun; Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood. For nothing now can ever come to any good.
  2. Jackie Lent

    Funerals on film

    The mere mention of the word "funeral" congers up memories of JFK's procession funeral with Jackie, Caroline and little John John saluting his father. It was the same with Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy and Princess Diana's funerals. I believe that these televised events made an indelible mark on everyone's psyche. Yet for me, the most profound expression of overwhelming loss came in the form of eulogy via a poem by W.H. Auden in Four Weddings and a Funeral. Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone, Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone, Silence the pianos and with muffled drum Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come. Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead, Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves, Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves. He was my North, my South, my East and West, My working week and my Sunday rest, My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song; I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong. The stars are not wanted now: put out every one; Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun; Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood. For nothing now can ever come to any good.
  3. Jackie Lent

    Funerals on film

    The short explanation is YES! It's called subliminal manipulation.
  4. Judgemental? Far from it. Not that Alan needs to be defended, but he did lay out the groundwork in post #1 for how to submit a film. One of the pleasures of this board that I have come to admire over the years is that no one (not the administrators, regular posters, etc.) has had the audacity to limit the definition of spirituality, by offering a "definitive" definition. It may seem odd, but I feel that spirituality (and this is not an attempt at definition) is much like comedy - completely subjective. What moves one person spiritually may not move another. But I am not going to say that because a certain film or piece of music, art, etc. does not move me spiritually, doesn't mean I am going to fault someone who is spiritually moved by the same. That is why there is such a wide variety of films on the list above, and I applaude A&F for not giving a specic definition. Thanks for bringing this back up. I have been thinking about my use of the word "completely" ever since I posted earlier today... it really bugged me that at the time I could not come up with a better word to use in that part of the sentence. I've finally decided that it just doesn't belong, so I'm excising it! I too love reading Ron's blog, it gives a lot to digest. Unlike some other movie discussion boards I have gone to, I think many people come away from the A&F board with a deeper insight into the films they are researching or discussing, which I think is a rarity on the internet. Hooray!!! You've made my weekend. Thanks for participating in this exercise of spiritual consciousness raising (a.k.a.critical thinking via discernment). It's wonderful to learn that despite differences of opinions, others too are inspired to engage in dialogue that is not limited to literal dogmatism.
  5. Enough media focus on sex scandals for breakfast, lunch & dinner. Now that everyone is 'feeling' the bitter truth: "it's the economy stupid". How about focusing on a truly salacious subject. The CEO's of industry. The private, the governmental and et tu military peddlers who elude public scrutiny by spinning their activities as something other than the rape of Free Market Capitalism. Free Market Capitalism w/out balanced government oversight and the authentic commitment by corporations to social responsibility becomes a predatory economic model. Unfortunately, this is where America is today! And what a standard we have set as this is also true of Free Market Capitalism as it's being used all over the world. I'm reminded of Marshall McLuhan's treatise on media content: "It's the juicy piece of meat carried by the burglar to distract the watchdog of the mind".
  6. Oh, good grief. That makes a nice, pretty, symmetry--but is hot air: Why? It's easy enough to see why science would favor arguments (although leaps of faith are necessary from time to time). Science is primarily concerned with things that can be observed, measured, and verified. But assertions must definitely be made in science. What is it about 'spirituality' that defies argumentation and requires mere assertion? You do realize that if you answer my question, you will have undermined whatever answer you might care to give. If, as you assert, spirituality is not to be argued, then you mustn't give me an argument in favor of that position! If you do give me an argument in favor of that position, then you can't hold that position as you will have just refuted it yourself! Talk about 'hot air'. Of course there is no argument. And I do not refute my assertion hence I will offer yet a third perspective. Ask yourself: 'What did Jesus do?' He certainly didn't argue about things of the spirit. He lived the true meaning of spirituality by his life. A living example of that which cannot be argued but only experienced from within.
  7. Dear Crim's, And we enlightened wonder why we have problems in the world at large. Not only have you mis-interpreted my artsandfaith blog article "symbolism v.s. spin" but you obviously didn't bother to read my words in context. Never said: 'daring the unthinkable' was about the collective unconscious. Hence, I respectfully suggest that you have another go at it. Then perhaps we'll have something to talk about. As for developing an argument v.s. assertion: I believe that spirituality is not something to be argued but rather asserted in the same way as science is not to asserted but argued. Ms. Lent, I wouldn't call your interpretation of DVC "daring the unthinkable." You say in your blog post that Dan Brown is symbolically talking about a "collective unconscious." That's neither daring nor unthinkable. Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy is essentially about a collective unconscious, as have been a variety of films, novels, and philosophical treatises. Collective unconscious is not daring - it's old hat. And it's not unthinkable - it's ground that has been tread so many times. You say that your blog gives a "symbolic analysis," but you don't tie any of your conclusions to the symbols in DVC at all. Instead, you seem to like the idea of a collective unconsciousness, and assert that it is Brown's true message, without showing that it is symbolically in the book in the slightest. If you're interested in doing an analysis, please do. But what you have there now is assertion, not argument.
  8. Viewed through a 3rd dimension, The Da Vinci Code inspires and renews interest in
  9. In response to the following: QUOTE (Alan Thomas @ Mar 15 2008, 02:54 PM) "Heck, I can't even get the definition of "2006" correct, and you expect me to define terms like "spiritual" and "significant". C'mon! But, in any cae, in keeping wth A&F tradition: I adamantly refuse to define "spiritually significant". I furthermore believe that this ambiguity is one of the keys to the list's success." Your point re: 'ambiguity' is well taken. But I disagree that offering a definition of spirituality limits it. Perhaps the confusion lies in the false perception that spirituality is a noun. It clearly is not. Rather, it is a verb which denotes an 'openness of spirit' to higher awareness / consciousness. That said, the mysterious & myriad of avenues to experiencing this 'openness of spirit' is where the 'subjectivity comes into play. A simple definition of a 'spiritually significant' film might be one which has stimulated the imagination of the viewer and impacted their soul in some manner. By way of example, some of us may have had our consciousness raised by a film that others would consider dark & therefore not 'spiritually significant": i.e. The Usual Suspects. However, it could be argued that it is one of the more spiritually significant films (especially in light of the truth behind the Iraq war & Dick Cheney's control over the military, CIA & entire U.S. Administration). Why you ask? Because it puts a face on evil. To quote Kevin Spacey's character Verbal Kint: "The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing man he didn't exist". And yes, I for one do possess the 'audacity' to define spirituality, even more when its politically incorrect. For more on spiritual significance please see my blog at http://www.artsandfaith.com/blog/jackie_lent/index.php? Judgemental? Far from it. Not that Alan needs to be defended, but he did lay out the groundwork in post #1 for how to submit a film. One of the pleasures of this board that I have come to admire over the years is that no one (not the administrators, regular posters, etc.) has had the audacity to limit the definition of spirituality, by offering a "definitive" definition. It may seem odd, but I feel that spirituality (and this is not an attempt at definition) is much like comedy - completely subjective. What moves one person spiritually may not move another. But I am not going to say that because a certain film or piece of music, art, etc. does not move me spiritually, doesn't mean I am going to fault someone who is spiritually moved by the same. That is why there is such a wide variety of films on the list above, and I applaude A&F for not giving a specic definition. Thanks for bringing this back up. I have been thinking about my use of the word "completely" ever since I posted earlier today... it really bugged me that at the time I could not come up with a better word to use in that part of the sentence. I've finally decided that it just doesn't belong, so I'm excising it! I too love reading Ron's blog, it gives a lot to digest. Unlike some other movie discussion boards I have gone to, I think many people come away from the A&F board with a deeper insight into the films they are researching or discussing, which I think is a rarity on the internet.
  10. Ok, let's revisit the question: "Why Is Dan Brown is smiling?" Beyond $$$$, it's because The Da Vinci Code has successfully fooled 99.9% of its critics. As a work of fiction it is but a ruse that seduces & dares the unthinkable. Therefore, any attempt at literal interpretation is unfounded. For more symbolic analysis see: http://www.artsandfaith.com/blog/jackie_lent/index.php
  11. From the perspective of depth psychology "asking the nest question" is indicative of the scared feminine. Perhaps Dan Brown doesn't limit the sacred feminine to the character of Sophie alone for good reason. For deeper analysis see http://www.artsandfaith.com/blog/jackie_lent/index.php For my money it's a better book. Let's hope it makes a better film. I was just looking at the DVC DVD extras since I have my last DVC speaking engagement tomorrow (why did the people who booked me think that anyone would be interested in November even if the film was a big hit??). Goldsman was saying that Sophie Neveu's story of discovering her identity was the most interesting thing for him. Maybe this is one of the problems with the film - it attempts to stick closely to the book at places where it really shouldn't because the focus has been put on Sophie whereas she is not the focus of the book. For all Brown talks about the importance of the sacred feminine, in the book Sophie is little more than a prop who can ask questions.
  12. I agree that the " film is espousing something very different from Christian worship." This scene shocked me too! Until I reflected on its symbolism & the fact that I am also a grandparent. The film dares the unthinkable: The demystification of long held belief systems & religious myths to reveal the hidden source of spirituality. For more symbolic analysis see my article "Symbolism v.s. Spin" on this site.
  13. Re:Tennison's open letter. Don't say 'no' until you check out the spiritual significance of the film. See http://www.artsandfaith.com/blog/jackie_lent/index.php?
  14. Great! You are letting me off with just a 'tap on the hand'. Would love to join the discussion & defend the film. Didn't know there was an active discussion. Where will I find it? Have 'searched' for The Da Vinci Code to no avail. Also, your responses have me thinking that artsandfaith.com may not be as authentic as its name implies. Your comments are nothing less than judgmental & as I have read in your comments, can't even offer a definition of what constitutes spirituality. I suggest that you try being helpful rather than playing a pope of the internet. respectfully. Jackie Lent
  15. Hummmmm! Don't see The Da Vinci Code on your list. Is this an oversight or is the film's spiritual significance in question? Either way, I invite you to read my article "Symbolism v.s. Spin" posted on ReelPoweCoach blog on this site. Jackie Lent
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