Overstreet

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About Overstreet

  • Rank
    Sometimes, there's a man.
  • Birthday 10/09/1970

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://jeffreyoverstreet.com
  • ICQ
    0
  • Twitter
    http://twitter.com/Overstweet

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Shoreline, WA (home) Seattle, WA (work)

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Novelist; film reviewer; editor
  • Favorite movies
    http://letterboxd.com/j_overstreet/list/jeffrey-overstreets-favorite-films/
  1. The excerpt Brian posted above works just fine as a review of Knight of Cups, in my opinion. (I revisited that last night.)
  2. Streaming on Netflix in the U.S.
  3. I've seen all kinds of stories about characters who suffer severely. Some of them were characters who seemed real to me. Others didn't. Chiron didn't. It's a matter of characterization. He seemed contrived to me. I also haven't seen particularly compelling evidence of how Chiron "resonated so deeply with the Black and gay community." I've seen a lot of enthusiasm from moviegoers who talk a lot more about how excited they are to see a well-crafted film about Black characters and about gay characters — and that is, indeed, something worth celebrating. But most of the buzz has been about how "we finally have a well made movie of this kind" and the socio-political significance of that than about the details of Chiron's character. This is now "Sheesh, stop hurting so much." This is about storytelling. Teaching fiction, I see a lot of stories coming from students which are the same story — a cipher-like character suffers the outrageous behaviors of crazy parents, intolerant neighbors, abusive lovers, etc., etc., and it's my job to help them find a *story* in there. Please keep in mind — I did not dislike this movie. I just found aspects of it frustrating and disappointing, so that I did not experience much suspension of disbelief. That's not a fact I can turn back the clock and change. Don't make me into Moonlight's enemy.
  4. Now streaming on Amazon Prime in the U.S.
  5. Spoiler-ish footage.
  6. One of my students is aiming to write a research paper on the films of Mel Gibson and his inclination to focus on characters who suffer injustice, persecution, and rejection. She wrote to me after searching for sources, saying, Have any of you come across (or written) substantial studies of Mel Gibson's body of work outside of the usual Passion of the Christ pieces?
  7. One of my students is aiming to write a research paper on the films of Mel Gibson and his inclination to focus on characters who suffer injustice, persecution, and rejection. She wrote to me after searching for sources, saying, Have any of you come across (or written) substantial studies of Mel Gibson's body of work outside of the usual Passion of the Christ pieces?
  8. My research-paper students, who are focused on writing about film, are beginning work on their major projects. I've introduced them to Arts & Faith, hoping that some of them might venture into this community with some questions related to their research, to draw upon your expertise. So... as a test case: Let's say I'm writing a research paper about the experience of children raised in a Buddhist tradition. What films would you recommend I watch as preliminary research? Kundun? What else? Have you come across any interviews with filmmakers who discuss portrayals of Buddhism in film? Are there particular texts you would recommend — both about Buddhism on film, and about the experiences of children raised in that tradition?
  9. Loved it. Here's my review. I'm trying to figure out why there's a B- / A- gap between SDG's review and mine. I suspect it's because he has much more invested in the Batman legacy than I do, so he's grading this one with considerable concern for the quality of this Batman narrative. I'm thinking of it first and foremost as a sendup of comic book superhero movies, and only secondly as a Batman story. And, as I've never been able to take Batman seriously as a character, I'm more inclined to like a movie that laughs at him than I am to like one that doesn't.
  10. Now streaming on Amazon Prime in the U.S.
  11. And now it's streaming on Netflix in the U.S.
  12. Now streaming on Amazon Prime! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06VSQ5TJ4/
  13. Good heavens. That's what they call "a departure."
  14. Thank you!
  15. I knew that reviews from certain evangelical sources were going to be horrifying, but wow... that doesn't make it any easier to read them. That hurt. In other news... I'm interviewing Scorsese today. Looks like I have a surprising amount of time to ask questions. Does anyone have any burning questions they'd like me to consider working into my plan?