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jsyarb

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About jsyarb

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  1. *pulls foot from mouth* *retreats*
  2. It wouldn't be a first, getting a nomination posthumously or a nomination for a comic book movie. Peter Finch won posthumously for Network, and Al Pacino got nominated for best supporting actor for Dick Tracy. A great performance is a great performance, and shouldn't be weighted on the basis of the film's genre. Network also was a drama that had multiple nominations. I didn't realize that Pacino was nominated for Dick Tracy, though that was at a time in his career when he could sneeze in a film and get an Oscar nomination for it. Also, I'm not denigrating the fact that it is a comic-book
  3. Don't take this the wrong way, because I obviously haven't seen the film yet, but if Heath Ledger was still living, do you think he'd be getting Oscar buzz for this performance? We are, after all, talking about a comic-book movie, no matter how much gravitas Nolan and Co. have brought to the material.
  4. jsyarb

    Wall-E

    I think Baehr loved the movie and hated to criticize it, but couldn't contain himself to not comment on anything that seemed even slightly "non-conservative" (read: non-corporate) in tone or theme. Also, far be it from me to call 'shenanigans' on what a filmmaker says his art is about, but I couldn't help thinking throughout the entire film, especially the second half, that Stanton had managed to succeed in all the places that Mike Judge slightly failed in Idiocracy.
  5. jsyarb

    Wall-E

    Dear heavens no! Our children can't be allowed to see anything that extolls protection of the Earth or encourages thoughtful economic choices! Woe, woe! A pox on these lefties!
  6. jsyarb

    W.

    Everything about this screams "extraordinarily bad idea".
  7. Unclear. He had a MySpace page that listed him as Catholic, and he has said that the Catholic cop Jim Kurring (played by John C. Reilly) in Magnolia was a representation of everything he would like to be as a person. IIRC, he's also referred to filmmaking as a form of confession. People of course have used There Will Be Blood as evidence that PT doesn't believe in God, but I'd say that's a fundamental misunderstanding of the film.
  8. jsyarb

    Wall-E

    Just got back from this about an hour ago. I'll have to post my full thoughts later, but I will say it's definitely Pixar's boldest picture yet, venturing into territory that "children's films" (if we can even honestly call a Pixar movie that anymore) rarely dare to tread. I also found it interesting that the crowd was predominantly young adults, with only a smattering of families with children, although that admittedly could have been due to the fairly late showtime. My preliminary marks for the film would be a 3.5 out of 4.
  9. It seems only fair to add the second clip of Tomlin losing it and railing at Russell's directing techniques in a separate scene. Again, super-duper NSFW: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4uTGvTFzyQ
  10. jsyarb

    Hancock

    This movie has been chopped, chopped, and chopped some more due to studio interference and bad test screenings. Luckily I wasn't really keen on the premise from the start, as I have no desire to add money to the Church of Scientology's coffers. Oh, he means it. Personally, I can't read a Kyle Smith review without having something sitting nearby that I can vomit into. He's almost as bad as Scott Holleran, and maybe worse since nobody takes Holleran's fascistic rants seriously.
  11. Ayn Rand's novels make Eli Roth's movies look like paragons of morality. I agree with an earlier poster; I can't bother to get my blood up over something like "The Last Temptation of Christ" but it seriously bothers me that anyone finds that "Atlas Shrugged" had any redeeming value, as entertainment or otherwise.
  12. I like David O. Russell's work immensely, but after those outtakes of his fights with Tomlin from the "Huckabee's" set started making the rounds, I can't believe he even still finds financing. Brilliant filmmaker, but clearly a mentally-unstable human being. By the way, here's the link to Russell going completely wacko if anyone hasn't seen it yet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F86s4Vq59Ks Warning: It is VERY NSFW. The funniest part is when Russell disappears off one part of the set, you can still hear him yelling and cursing, and then he magically re-appears through a door on another p
  13. I haven't liked any of Tarantino's films except for "Jackie Brown". In fact, I disliked "Pulp Fiction" so intensely I've pretty much avoided everything else he's done. It's not one of those things where I'm incredulous that he's considered talented by so many; clearly he's talented. His films, save for "Jackie" (which doesn't even feel like a Tarantino other than the nonstop profanity) are just not my cup of tea.
  14. SPOILERS GALORE BELOW: It seems obvious to me that, like so many other details of the film, the final line had multiple meanings. There is of course the literal: "I'm finished with my breakfast you brought me. Could you take these plates away?" "I'm finished with my meeting because I have caved the other man's skull in and he doesn't seem to have anything else to say. Could you tidy up and burn this body?" And then there's the metaphorical: the mocking twist on the last words of Christ, said by the Lord when he had completed His mission of redemption, and now said by this anti-Christ a
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