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Gina

Member
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    383
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About Gina

  • Rank
    Member

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Writer/blogger
  • About my avatar
    From "Little Dorrit" (icon made by birdienl at LiveJournal)
  • Favorite movies
    Singin' in the Rain My Fair Lady Mr. Smith Goes to Washington Notorious
  • Favorite music
    Classical Country Broadway
  • Favorite creative writing
    C. S. Lewis Dorothy L. Sayers Charles Dickens
  • Favorite visual art
    Monet

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  1. My review of the published script: http://www.breakpoint.org/features-columns/youth-reads/entry/40/29666
  2. Thanks, Evan. Really looking forward to this film. I've been wondering how they were going to handle the question you raised -- sounds like they left it a bit ambiguous?
  3. I've seen some of Twelve O'Clock High. There's a lot that goes on in it, but the part everyone seems to remember best is Gregory Peck as a pilot cracking under the strain of too many bombing missions.
  4. Of course I'm biased because he used to be my boss, but . . .
  5. Interesting point. I wonder why they didn't keep it in the script. Maybe it was simply cut for time, but it seems rather important.
  6. I've been gone a while too, but wanted to share my take on the gender role conversation that's been going on with regards to the movie. http://www.breakpoint.org/features-columns/articles/entry/12/28682 (Funny how a blockbuster can bring us all out of the woodwork. :-) )
  7. My thoughts exactly . . . no, that's not quite accurate. My thoughts were more like "BARF." (Spoken by someone who's -- reluctantly -- a member of Christian Mingle.)
  8. Update on the series. (A new installment, on "The Women," is going up Friday.)
  9. For those interested, we've got a new Q&A with Scott Derrickson over at BreakPoint.
  10. They didn't choose it. Edward Tangye Lean founded the group, and he chose it. Though why he chose it, I don't know. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Tangye_Lean
  11. Gina

    The Thin Man (1934)

    It's hard for me to say which of the first two movies is better! They're both so good. (After that, I agree, the quality drops off.) One interesting thing about the second one is that you get such a mix of acting styles. There are Powell and Loy, who were masters of the screwball style. Then you have a supporting cast full of more melodramatic, stilted, old-fashioned actors, with two main exceptions. Jessie Ralph as Nora's aunt does the "grande dame" hilariously. And 28-year-old Jimmy Stewart, with a very natural style, acts almost everyone else right off the screen. The film becomes s
  12. Attica, indeed he was! Beth, thanks so much. Introverts unite (separately, of course)! ;-) I saw that Hornaday piece the other day. I've been reading her work in the Post for years and never guessed she was a Christian -- which I guess means she's accomplished what she was trying to accomplish!
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