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Peter T Chattaway

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Everything posted by Peter T Chattaway

  1. Peter T Chattaway

    Mary Poppins Returns (2018)

    NBooth wrote: : IMDB lists the character as “Jack,” fwiw Oh, weird. Though it does make sense of the character's age, at least.
  2. Peter T Chattaway

    Mary Poppins Returns (2018)

    Looks like Bert hasn't aged a day either...? (If anything, he got younger. Lin-Manuel Miranda is currently 38, and Dick Van Dyke was 39 when Mary Poppins came out. Emily Blunt, for her part, is 35, while Julie Andrews was 29 when Mary Poppins came out.)
  3. Peter T Chattaway

    Mission: Impossible: Fallout

    Incidentally, this weekend Fallout became the top-grossing Mission: Impossible film in North America, beating the record set 18 years ago by Mission: Impossible 2 (the John Woo movie). But of course, there has been 18 years of inflation since then. Meanwhile, this is also easily Tom Cruise's highest-grossing film overseas and worldwide, ever. (In North America, it still lags behind War of the Worlds.) I don't know how to factor inflation into that when one considers all the various currencies that would have to be converted from all the different time periods.
  4. Peter T Chattaway

    Mission: Impossible: Fallout

    Links to our threads on Mission: Impossible III (2006), Mission: Impossible: Ghost Protocol (2011) and Mission: Impossible: Rogue Nation (2015). Another sequel is already in development. Of course.
  5. Peter T Chattaway

    Joker (2019)

  6. Peter T Chattaway

    Joker (2019)

    Link to our thread on the standalone Joker movie starring Jared Leto. Links to our threads on the DC Cinematic Universe films Man of Steel (2013), Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016), Suicide Squad (2016), Wonder Woman (2017), Justice League (2017), Aquaman (2018), Shazam! (2019), Wonder Woman 1984 (2019) and Birds of Prey (in development), as well as the in-development Flashpoint, Black Adam, Cyborg, Green Lantern, Nightwing, Batgirl, Gotham City Sirens and Justice League Dark movies and the not-yet-dated Superman, Batman and Justice League sequels.   Links to our threads on the Batman 2.0 films Batman Begins (2005), The Dark Knight (2008) and The Dark Knight Rises (2012).  Links to our threads on The Lego Movie (2014), The Lego Batman Movie (2017) and The Lego Movie 2 (2018), at least one of which has the Joker. - - - The Joker Origin Story On Deck: Todd Phillips, Scott Silver, Martin Scorsese Aboard WB/DC Film EXCLUSIVE: Warner Bros and DC are in the early stages of another Batman Universe spinoff movie, this one telling the origin story of the signature villain The Joker. The studio has set The Hangover‘s Todd Phillips to co-write a script with 8 Mile scribe Scott Silver. Phillips will direct the movie, and Martin Scorsese will produce it with Phillips. This will be the first film under a new banner that has yet to be named in which WB can expand the canon of DC properties and create unique storylines with different actors playing the iconic characters. I’m told that the intention is to make an origin story that isn’t part of any other iteration. The Joker has memorably been part of two Batman movies in the form of Jack Nicholson and Heath Ledger, and was most recently played by Jared Leto in the first Suicide Squad film. He will reprise in the Suicide Squad sequel and the Harley Quinn spinoff, but this new film will launch the character with a different actor, possibly younger. . . . Deadline.com, August 22
  7. Peter T Chattaway

    The Predator

    Links to our threads on Alien Vs Predator (2004-2007) and Predators (2010). We don't seem to have any threads on Predator (1987) or Predator 2 (1990). - - - ‘Iron Man 3's’ Shane Black to Direct ‘Predator’ Reboot for Fox Shane Black is attached to direct a reboot of the classic 80s action movie “Predator” for 20th Century Fox, an individual familiar with the project has told TheWrap. Black will co-write a treatment for the film with “Monster Squad” director Fred Dekker, who will then write the screenplay himself. . . . Black has a long history with the “Predator” franchise, having appeared in a bit part in the original film. . . . TheWrap.com, June 24 - - - Hands up, everyone who remembered that Shane Black had a bit part in the original film, and who thought about that the moment they saw this headline. [raises hand] For some reason this reminds me of how William Wyler was an assistant director on the 1925 version of Ben-Hur before he became the Oscar-winning director of the 1959 version of Ben-Hur. (And, hmmm, the gap between those films was 34 years, while the gap between the original Predator and today is 27 years and counting...)
  8. Peter T Chattaway

    Raiders!

    Links to our threads on Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), the first three Indiana Jones movies (1981-1989), The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (1992-1993) and Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008). Link to my blog post on a screening of Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Adaptation that I attended in May 2008. - - - ‘Napoleon Dynamite’ Producer Sets Movie About The Kids Who Made Shot-By-Shot ‘Raiders Of The Lost Ark’ Remake EXCLUSIVE: Napoleon Dynamite producer Jeremy Coon has optioned Raiders!, the Alan Eisenstock book that tells how two Mississippi kids set out to remake Raiders Of The Lost Ark. The pals started at 11 and finished when they turned 18, and in that time managed to re-stage every scene, shot and stunt in their backyards and basements. They first shot on Betamax and then on VHS when the former became obsolete. The kid filmmakers, Chris Strompolos and Eric Zala, met in elementary school and are now in their early 40s. They will produce with Coon two projects and their life rights are part of the package. First, Coon intends to direct a documentary as he works to set up a narrative feature, which is essentially a movie about the making of a movie that is a remake of another movie. When Coon first saw Raiders Of The Lost Ark: The Adaptation at a film festival, it was during a period when all of the optimism and wide-eyed wonder that went into making the gem Napoleon Dynamite had been replaced by depression and cynicism. Coon and his cohorts were forced to sue Fox after feeling shortchanged by the proceeds of their $400,000 budget film that grossed nearly $50 million worldwide and made a lot more than that on video and ancillaries. The suit is still going on. “I thought the movie was an urban myth but when I saw it, from a filmmaker perspective it was more inspiring than any movie I’d ever seen,” Coon told me. “These kids had done something ridiculous and impossible and the last time I had the experience of a movie being made because it was sheer fun was when I’d seen Kill Bill. I went in feeling cynical but there was no cynicism in these kids. They did the movie because they loved it. It had its premiere and then sat on a shelf.” That is because you can’t make a shot-by-shot remake of a seminal blockbuster film without permission and rights. Coon admits it is very possible that he will need the cooperation of Steven Spielberg and George Lucas in order to be able to do his movies. Spielberg told the youngsters he’d seen and loved what they did; they haven’t gotten any feedback from Lucas. Their ordeal spanned from 1981-89, when they’d film each summer and try their best not to get killed. . . . Deadline.com, October 14
  9. Peter T Chattaway

    Little Women

    Links to our threads on the modernized "faith-based" 2018 movie and the once-in-development dystopian CW TV series. - - - Sony Sets Up ‘Little Women’ Adaptation with Olivia Milch Writing (EXCLUSIVE) Sony Pictures has set up a new adaptation of “Little Women,” bringing on Olivia Milch to pen the script. Denise Di Novi and Robin Swicord are producing the latest version of Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel about four sisters growing up after the Civil War. The most recent film adaptation was Gillian Armstrong’s 1994 version, which Sony was also a part of, with a cast that included Winona Ryder, Kirsten Dunst and a very young Christian Bale. That pic made $95 million at the worldwide box office and landed three Oscar nominations including one for Ryder in the lead actress category. Earlier versions starred Katharine Hepburn (1933) and Elizabeth Taylor (1949, pictured). . . . Variety, October 23
  10. Peter T Chattaway

    At Eternity’s Gate (Schnabel 2018)

    So both Martin Scorsese and Willem Dafoe -- the Last Temptation of Christ duo! -- have played Vincent Van Gogh now. (Scorsese did it in Akira Kurosawa's Dreams.)
  11. Peter T Chattaway

    The Predator

    NSFW (language, violence).
  12. Peter T Chattaway

    First Man

    So apparently this film omits one of the most iconic moments from the moon landing -- the planting of the American flag on the lunar surface. Some people are doing the usual "Hollywood is un-American" thing in response. And certainly, I would prefer that historical details like that not be erased. (It was called the space *race*, after all -- America went to the moon not (merely) out of the goodness of its heart on behalf of all humanity, but to one-up the Russians.) At the same time, I suspect a lot of this had to do with Hollywood's increasing dependence on non-American markets (especially, nowadays, China, which has a space program of its own) to maintain its profitability.
  13. Peter T Chattaway

    First Man

    Links to our threads on director Damien Chazelle's previous films Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench (2009), Whiplash (2014) and La La Land (2016). Links to our threads on previous films about the Apollo missions Apollo 13 (1995), In the Shadow of the Moon (2007) and Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011).
  14. Peter T Chattaway

    The Lord of the Rings Trilogy

    Rob Z wrote: : Treebeard, check, whose wisdom and patience is traded for some phony feel-good Hobbit heroics. : Faramir, check, whose understanding, goodness, gentleness, and self-control are traded for thinner, inferior characterization and a pointless diversion that eats up screen time. : These indeed are hard to forgive. : The third?  Theoden, who I gather was not as defeatist in the novel as he is in the film. I believe it was Darren H who pointed out, back when The Two Towers first came out, that all three of the parallel storylines in that film had been modified to produce a "last-minute change of heart", or some such thing. Thus, the Entmoot decides *against* getting involved in the war, rather than *in favour* of it, so that Treebeard can have a sudden (and hasty!) change of heart when he sees all the tree stumps. And thus, Faramir decides to *take* Frodo and the Ring, rather than let them go, so that he can have a sudden change of heart and let them go after all. And thus, Theoden is all defeatist doom-and-gloom until finally he decides to ride out into battle at the end, just before Eomer arrives with Gandalf. Some fans were upset simply because the characters had been changed, period. For me, the changes make The Two Towers the weakest film in the trilogy (on a narrative level; the film does have some of the best images, moments, etc. in the whole trilogy) because they don't make any *narrative* sense. And the expanded version of the film -- which tells us that the trees talk to each other -- makes even *less* sense. Why would Treebeard not know about the devastation of the forest, if the trees have been communicating with each other and Treebeard himself is in constant touch with the trees? And when he sends out his call to war, suddenly all these Ents start walking out of the forest, and... we're supposed to believe they were all walking or standing right by the edge of the devastation, but none of them had *noticed* the devastation yet? And the Faramir thing is just... weird. Faramir actually sees Frodo *almost* surrender the Ring to a Ringwraith, and then he *lets Frodo go*, knowing that Frodo is going deeper into Ringwraith territory, because "we understand one another", or something? The decision makes no sense without the novel's characterization of Faramir as a man of principle, etc. -- characterization that the films omit pretty much entirely. And those diversions are typical of narrative changes that appear *elsewhere* in the trilogy, too; there is a constant tendency to throw the characters off-course only to put them back on-course again, whether it's Frodo sending Sam away (after Gollum tricks Frodo into thinking Sam ate all the food) or Arwen being sent to the ships until she has her vision of Older Aragorn with Child. Instead of a story that is always pointing forwards, albeit sometimes at different angles, we have a story that is constantly looping back in on itself -- the linear path was obvious from the start (as it was in the books), then for some reason the characters go off that path, and then the characters retrace their steps and go *back* to the path (because the filmmakers didn't want to change the story *too* much). : My takeaway from my most recent rewatch was simply how long they are! Since becoming a parent, I hardly have the time/energy for a 2 hour film in one sitting. One day you may be grateful for a film that will keep your kids busy for three hours rather than only two.
  15. Peter T Chattaway

    Films about exile and restoration?

    Rob Z wrote: : Also a lot of hero films involve a kind of exile from a community and then a restoration via a return that saves the community (or something like that). Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home!
  16. Peter T Chattaway

    The Lord of the Rings Trilogy

    Rushmore wrote: : It's strange to me that Peter Jackson's Hobbit movies are so widely derided and mocked while The Lord of the Rings is lauded to the skies, even though all the elements that made The Hobbit: Gilding the Dragon so ridiculous are present in Lord of the Rings too - to a lesser degree, usually, but very clearly present. I dunno, I've rewatched the LotR trilogy twice in recent years, both times with my kids, and I've been pleasantly surprised that it all holds together (with The Two Towers being the weakest link in the chain, due to the changes that were made to three significant supporting characters) after the debacle that was the Hobbit trilogy (which I am *not* showing to my kids). I certainly agree that the *seeds* of what made the Hobbit movies so bad are there in the LotR trilogy -- and indeed, the fact that the extended version of The Return of the King is the first extended version that makes the movie *worse* indicates the trajectory that the franchise as a whole was on -- but I still find a lot to like in the trilogy.
  17. Peter T Chattaway

    Films about exile and restoration?

    Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner is noteworthy for being a supposedly "authentic" First Nations story that actually has a "Christianized" ending (i.e. the restoration of the exiled person does *not* involve killing off the people who exiled him, which is how the typical pre-Christian story of this sort ends; cf. Homer's Odyssey).
  18. Peter T Chattaway

    Acme

    Possibly not the same project, but hey: - - - Warner Bros’ Wile E. Coyote Movie Finds Its Scribes In The Silberman Brothers EXCLUSIVE: Road Runner’s nemesis, Wile E. Coyote a.k.a. ‘Super Genius’, is getting his own big screen feature and Deadline has learned that Jon and Josh Silberman, the supervising producers behind CBS’ Living Biblically have been hired to write Coyote Vs. Acme. Chris McKay, the director of The Lego Batman Movie, is producing. . . . Deadline.com, August 28
  19. Peter T Chattaway

    Paul, Apostle of Christ

    FWIW, I never thought of this as an "evangelical" film because I was already familiar with the filmmakers and their Catholicism through their previous film, Full of Grace. Also, wow, I can't believe I didn't link to any of my coverage of this film in this thread. Here's the tag for the film at my blog: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/filmchat/tag/paul-apostle-of-christ And, just to cite one of my posts, here's my interview with the film's star, James Faulkner (who previously played one of Paul's Jewish-Christian opponents in 1981's Peter and Paul): http://www.patheos.com/blogs/filmchat/2018/06/interview-james-faulkner-on-playing-paul-apostle-of-christ-now-available-in-digital-form-and-coming-to-dvd-next-week.html Okay, one more post: Here is my somewhat exhaustive scene guide to the film, noting all the scriptural references and source materials (canonical and apocryphal): http://www.patheos.com/blogs/filmchat/2018/03/paul-apostle-of-christ-a-scene-guide-with-clips-and-scriptural-references.html
  20. Peter T Chattaway

    Paul, Apostle of Christ

    Link to our thread on Hugh Jackman's Apostle Paul project, which I haven't heard much about lately. Jim Caviezel is playing Luke in a new film about Paul, which is currently being shot on Malta with a 2018 release in mind. The film also co-stars Bible-movie veterans James Faulkner as Paul (his credits include Peter and Paul and the 2010 version of Ben-Hur; he also played Herod Agrippa in I, Claudius), Joanne Whalley as Priscilla (her credits include A.D. The Bible Continues and The Ark) and John Lynch as Aquila (his credits include The Passion, The Nativity and Killing Jesus). From the director of Full of Grace, which was set near the end of the Virgin Mary's life, Paul, Apostle of Christ is similarly set during Paul's twilight years (in prison, in his case).
  21. Peter T Chattaway

    Bond 25

  22. Peter T Chattaway

    Bond 25

    Links to our threads on Casino Royale (2006), Quantum of Solace (2008), Skyfall (2012) and SPECTRE (2015). The 25th official James Bond film has a release date -- November 8, 2019 -- but no cast or director yet. This would be the fourth time that there was a four-(or-more)-year gap between Bond films: there was the six-year gap between Timothy Dalton's last film and Pierce Brosnan's first film, there was a four-year gap between Brosnan's last film and Daniel Craig's first film, and there was a four-year gap between Quantum of Solace and Skyfall. There are rumours that, if Craig *does* come back, this might be the last Bond film produced by the Broccoli family. The end of a 57-year era. And if Craig *does* play Bond again, it will mean he has played Bond longer than any other actor: there was a 12-year span between Roger Moore's first and last films (from 1973's Live and Let Die to 1985's A View to a Kill), and there would be a 13-year span between Daniel Craig's first and last films (from 2006's Casino Royale to 2019's Bond 25). Though Moore starred in seven films and Craig will have appeared in only five. (Connery, for his part starred in five movies in five years -- from 1962's Dr No to 1967's You Only Live Twice -- and then, after George Lazenby starred in one film as Bond, Connery returned to the role with 1971's Diamonds Are Forever, giving him six official Bond films in nine years.)
  23. Peter T Chattaway

    Mary Magdalene (2018)

    *** SPOILERS *** The film is out on DVD in a few countries, so I ordered a copy from Amazon UK and it arrived a few days ago, and I watched it last night. I didn't take any notes, as I assumed I would have to see the film again before writing anything up, but, if I may post a few random thoughts... Suffice it to say that this film felt like a better version of Killing Jesus to me, inasmuch as there was still an interesting tension between revisionism and adherence to the traditional story, but I thought this film held together better at the aesthetic level at least. I didn't buy this film's version of Jesus at all, and yet I greatly appreciated the way the film respected his prophetic power while simultaneously indicating that there was something kind of "weird" about it; you can totally understand why people would say that Jesus healed by the power of demons etc. And it's kind of intriguing to see that Jesus identifies with Mary Magdalene partly because they have *both* been falsely accused of being possessed by devils... but that just underscores one of the film's revisionist impulses, inasmuch as the gospels clearly say that Jesus cast demons out of Mary and the film says Mary never had any to begin with. (Just for the record, I went to a Pentecostal high school and kept in touch with my schoolmates for a few years afterwards, and I literally walked in on one of them (and her then-boyfriend) trying to cast a demon out of her ex-boyfriend at one point, so I don't doubt for a second that people in first-century Palestinian peasant culture might have called for an exorcist because Mary Magdalene wasn't conforming to their social-marital expectations or whatever. I find that subplot sadly believable. I just note that the movie's handling of that subplot is at odds with what the gospels actually *say*.) The film's treatment of the Resurrection is similarly strange. Jesus *appears* to have come back to life -- Mary Magdalene certainly thinks so -- but all she gets from this is the idea that we all need to love and forgive each other. There is no larger mythic or narrative context that is confirmed or disrupted for Mary by the Resurrection -- no expectation that humanity as a whole, or at the very least Israel as a whole, will be part of the Resurrection of which Jesus is the "first fruits". Instead, Jesus seems to have come back from the dead just to... tell one person to tell everyone else to be kind to each other? Meanwhile, Peter, who only *hears* about the Resurrection, immediately assumes that there will be a Second Coming and proceeds to lay the groundwork for the institutional church that will act as an earthly kingdom awaiting this Second Coming. Now, it is certainly true that the apostles expected an earthly kingdom *even after the Resurrection took place* -- that's made clear by Acts 1:6 -- and I really do appreciate the way that this film focuses on the apocalyptic "kingdom" talk, which is a major part of the synoptic gospels and is often glossed over by other films, but I have a hard time believing that he'd go about establishing a church of *any* sort in the name of an executed would-be messiah unless he had had some personal, disruptive encounter with the resurrected Jesus himself. I've got lots of other scattered thoughts, but maybe I should save them for a write-up down the road. I *was* intrigued by one form of "diversity" among the apostles that I hadn't expected: the fact that there was a range of ages, from young men to middle-aged guys and the relatively old.
  24. Peter T Chattaway

    Mary Magdalene (2018)

    There may be a new movie about Mary Magdalene next year. Mary Magdalene has been portrayed in numerous Jesus films, of course, but certain films have made a particular point of highlighting the character, e.g.: Close to Jesus: Mary Magdalene (2000), Mary (2005), The Da Vinci Code (2006), Magdalena: Released from Shame (2007) and the once-in-development Magdalena. I also appreciated the way both The Bible (2013) and A.D. The Bible Continues (2015) avoided the "prostitute" business and extended the character's involvement in the early church into the book of Acts.
  25. Peter T Chattaway

    Jeannette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc

    Links to our threads on Carl Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928), Victor Fleming's Joan of Arc (1948), Otto Preminger's Saint Joan (1957), Robert Bresson's The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962), Philippe Ramos' The Silence of Joan (2011), The Hollow Crown (2012-2016), Kimberly Cutter's The Maid (in development) and Dana Stevens' The Maid and The Queen: The Secret History of Joan of Arc (in development). Link to a thread from Sep-Oct 2003 in which SDG and I butted heads over Joan of Arc. Links to our threads on earlier Bruno Dumont films Twentynine Palms (2003), Hadewijch (2009), Outside Satan (2011), Camille Claudel 1915 (2013) and Li'l Quinquin (2014). We don't seem to have any threads on The Life of Jesus (1997), Humanité (1999), Flanders (2006) or Slack Bay (2016). - - - Berlin: Bruno Dumont Set for Joan of Arc Musical Drama (EXCLUSIVE) Bruno Dumont, whose 2013 Juliette Binoche starrer “Camille Claudel 1915” competed in Berlin, will next be directing “Jeanette,” a musical drama based on Charles Peguy’s play “Le Mystere de la charite de Jeanne d’Arc. Produced by Jean Brehat for 3B Prods., “Jeanette” the musical will focus on the part of Peguy’s play that deals with Joan of Arc as a child, from age 8-12, when she started to embrace her sacred mission. Arte France Cinema is co-producing. Like 2014’s “Li’l Quinquin,” Dumont’s comedy-drama TV mini-series that premiered at Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight and sold worldwide, “Jeanette” is being produced for television but will be repped by a sales agent for theatrical distribution abroad. “Jeanette’s” rock and techno score will be composed by Gautier Serre (aka Igorrr) and choreographed by Philippe Decoufle, whose credits include “Le Dernier Chaperon rouge” and “New Order: Substance.” Shooting will start in August. Variety, February 14
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