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Peter T Chattaway

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Everything posted by Peter T Chattaway

  1. Peter T Chattaway

    Super Size Me

    A Big Mac Attack, or a False Alarm? But did McDonald’s really cause Mr. Spurlock’s ill health? His claims were dramatic. Before the 30-day experiment, he said, he was in a “good spot” healthwise. By the experiment’s end, he reported experiencing fatigue and shakes (trembling, not Shamrock). Most disturbing, and most widely reported, was that he had suffered liver damage. The New York Times review was headlined “You Want Liver Failure With That?” The doctor examining him during the experiment said the fast food was “pickling his liver” and that it looked like an “alcoholic’s after a binge.” Fast-forward to December 2017, when Mr. Spurlock issued a #MeToo mea culpa titled “I Am Part of the Problem,” detailing a lifetime of sexual misdeeds. As a result, YouTube dropped its plans to screen his “Super Size Me” sequel, and other broadcasters cut ties. But overlooked in all this was a stunning admission that calls into question the veracity of the original “Super Size Me.” After blaming his parents for his bad acts, Mr. Spurlock asked: “Is it because I’ve consistently been drinking since the age of 13? I haven’t been sober for more than a week in 30 years.” Could this be why his liver looked like that of an alcoholic? Were those shakes symptoms of alcohol withdrawal? Mr. Spurlock’s 2017 confession contradicts what he said in his 2004 documentary. “Any alcohol use?” the doctor asks at the outset. “Now? None,” he replies. In explaining his experiment, he says: “I can only eat things that are for sale over the counter at McDonald’s—water included.” Through a publicist, Mr. Spurlock declined to comment for this article. Journalists should have asked for verification of his claims back when “Super Size Me” came out. Instead, he got supportive headlines and endless awards. Mr. Spurlock has recently emerged from rehab—yes, it was a 30-day stint—and is looking to revive his career. Maybe he will clean up his personal behavior, but he also owes viewers a full accounting of the truth behind “Super Size Me.” Wall Street Journal, May 23
  2. Peter T Chattaway

    Star Wars: Han Solo origin story spin-off

  3. Peter T Chattaway

    Star Wars: Han Solo origin story spin-off

    Links to the threads on Episode I, Episode II, Episode III, Episode IV, Episode V, Episode VI, Episode VII, Episode VIII, Episode IX and the 2004 and 2006 editions of Episodes IV-VI on DVD and the 2011 edition of Episodes I-VI on Blu-Ray, as well as The Clone Wars, Rogue One, Rebels and the various rumoured other TV series (plus one quasi-duplicate thread on the comedy series) and spin-off movies. See also the threads on 'Star Wars Debate Redux' (which began as a place to bash Episode II; Jul 8 - Nov 11, 2003), 'Sci fi = spiritual? Star Wars, X2, etc.' (Apr 12-14, 2004), 'Best Star Wars Movie?' (with poll; Apr 18-20, 2004), 'Top 100 Discussion: The Star Wars original trilogy?' (May 6-7, 2004), 'Is Star Wars Blasphemous?' (Jun 15 - Jul 25, 2005), 'Star Wars in 20 minutes' (Aug 8-9, 2006) and 'Star Wars: Uncut' (Apr 2010). Links to our threads on previous films and TV shows directed by Christopher Miller and Phil Lord Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs (2009), 21 Jump Street (2012), The Lego Movie (2014), 22 Jump Street (2014) and The Last Man on Earth (2015-?). The screenplay is by Lawrence Kasdan (who co-wrote Episodes V and VI as well as Raiders of the Lost Ark and, uh, Dreamcatcher) and his son Jon (writer-director of 2007's In the Land of Women and 2012's The First Time). Coming to a theatre near you May 25, 2018.
  4. Peter T Chattaway

    Earthsea

    Links to our threads on Earthsea (2004) and Tales from Earthsea (2006). - - - Oscar Nominated Producer Jennifer Fox Nabs Film Rights To ‘Earthsea’ Book Series EXCLUSIVE: Jennifer Fox, the producer behind the Oscar-nominated legal thriller, Michael Clayton, has optioned the film rights to fantasy book series, Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin, who agreed to allow Fox to translate her work into a series of films before she passed away in January. . . . Fox’s producing credits [include] Nightcrawler with Jake Gyllenhaal, as well as the Denzel Washington-starrer, Roman J. Israel, Esq, and The Bourne Legacy. . . . Deadline.com, May 25
  5. Peter T Chattaway

    Ready Player One

    Hmmm. I hadn't thought about the dominance of Warner-owned content here, but I guess that is a point. It's kind of a funny thing to consider right now, for me, as I've been doing some reading about the history of animation over the last 40 years, and one key development in that history was the production of Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, arguably the first film of the "Disney renaissance" (it came out one year before The Little Mermaid kicked off the string of Ashman-Menken musicals that also included Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin, and it definitely paved the way for the acceptance of Disney cartoons as films that *adults* could enjoy); and one of the most notable things about that film is how it brought together animated characters from *multiple* studios (the first-ever on-screen pairing of Donald Duck and Daffy Duck! of Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny!). And, in turn, one of the things that made the bringing-together of so many studios possible was the role that Steven Spielberg played behind the scenes on that film; the movie was produced by Disney, which was then being run by Jeffrey Katzenberg (Spielberg's future DreamWorks partner), and Spielberg was buddies with the people at Warner Brothers (who had worked with him on Twilight Zone: The Movie, The Color Purple and Empire of the Sun, which he (co-)directed, as well as Gremlins, The Goonies and InnerSpace, which he produced). The film was also directed by Robert Zemeckis, who was something of a Spielberg protege (Spielberg having produced Zemeckis's earlier films Used Cars and Back to the Future). So, there once was a time when Spielberg was arguably bigger than any one studio -- he could bring studios *together*! -- and it's interesting if his newest film, which is *supposed* to be a nostalgic pop-culture mash-up a la Roger Rabbit, actually limits itself to a single studio's intellectual property. (It doesn't quite, though; the chestburster from the Alien movies is a Fox property, for example.)
  6. Peter T Chattaway

    Mowgli (aka The Jungle Book)

    Link to our thread on the live-action version of The Jungle Book now being developed at Disney. - - - Steve Kloves To Write-Direct ‘The Jungle Book’ For Warner Bros EXCLUSIVE: Steve Kloves is making a deal to write, direct and produce The Jungle Book at Warner Bros. The film is a live action of the Rudyard Kipling classic about an orphaned boy raised by wolves and other animals, which try to protect him from the ferocious tiger Shere-Khan. The deal keeps Kloves in the Warner Bros fold, where he has been the backbone of the Harry Potter series, and most recently scripted Akira. Mike Fleming, Deadline.com, April 27
  7. Peter T Chattaway

    Mowgli (aka The Jungle Book)

  8. Peter T Chattaway

    Happytime Murders

    Seriously NSFW here (language, violence, body fluids, etc.).
  9. Peter T Chattaway

    Pixar: The studio, its history and process

    Disney considering welcoming back Pixar co-founder John Lasseter after allegations of unwanted touching: report Executives at Walt Disney Co. have discussed bringing animation guru John Lasseter back to the company in a new role that would reduce his managerial power but allow him to retain creative influence, according to a person familiar with the matter. Those discussions come as the end of Mr. Lasseter’s six-month leave, taken following accusations of unwelcome hugging and other touching, approaches on May 21. So far, Disney has given no indication whether or not Mr. Lasseter will return. It is also possible that Monday will pass with no decision. . . . Wall Street Journal, May 16
  10. Peter T Chattaway

    Star Wars: Han Solo origin story spin-off

    For some reason that Chaw review leads me to think this film is *also* going to give us a back-story, not just for the Kessel Run, but for the bit in The Empire Strikes Back where Threepio says to Han, "Sir, I don't know where your ship learned to communicate, but it has the most peculiar dialect."
  11. Peter T Chattaway

    Star Wars: Han Solo origin story spin-off

    I sense a pattern forming...
  12. Peter T Chattaway

    The Magnificent Seven (2016)

    Link to our thread on The Magnificent Seven (1960). We don't appear to have a thread on Seven Samurai (1954). - - - Tom Cruise attached to MGM's 'Magnificent Seven' As MGM prepares to start production on "RoboCop" and "Carrie" later this year, the studio is going back to the vault again to develop a remake of John Sturges' 1960 Western "The Magnificent Seven" with Tom Cruise attached to star. There is no director onboard yet, though sources tell Variety that MGM has quietly started its search for a writer. Sources caution that while Cruise has long been interested in saddling up for a "Magnificent Seven" remake, the project is still a long ways off and is not in Cruise's immediate plans. "The Magnificent Seven," itself a remake of Akira Kurosawa's 1954 classic "Seven Samurai," starred Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and Horst Buchholz as a group of American gunmen hired to protect a small Mexican village from a group of savage bandits led by Calvera (Eli Wallach). The 1960 film was followed by three sequels, and "The Magnificent Seven" was remade as a CBS series in 1998-2000. MGM is focused on mining its library for redos. In addition to "RoboCop" and "Carrie," the Lion is developing remakes of "Poltergeist," with Sam Raimi producing; "WarGames," with Seth Gordon directing; "Death Wish," with Joe Carnahan directing; and "Valley Girl." Open Road will distribute MGM's "Red Dawn" remake on Nov. 21. . . . Variety, May 21
  13. Peter T Chattaway

    Avengers: Infinity War Part I

    Links to our threads on Iron Man (2008), The Incredible Hulk (2008), Iron Man 2 (2010), Thor (2011), Captain America: The First Avenger (2011), The Avengers (2012), Iron Man 3 (2013), Thor: The Dark World (2013), Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014), Guardians of the Galaxy (2014), Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), Ant-Man (2015), Captain America: Civil War (2016), Doctor Strange (2016), Guardians of the Galaxy 2 (2017), Thor: Ragnarok (2017), Black Panther (2017), Captain Marvel (2018), Inhumans (2018) and Avengers: Infinity War Part II (2019). Coming May 4, 2018.
  14. Peter T Chattaway

    The Tree of Life (2011)

    Brian D wrote: : Wow, that is exciting news. Especially given Sean Penn's statement that this film was a lot better as originally scripted than it ended up being after the edit for theater release. I would caution against the assumption that "more screen time" equals "closer to the script". Malick is kind of notorious for telling actors to just ignore the script *on set*, let alone whatever he decides to do with it in the editing room.
  15. Peter T Chattaway

    Avengers: Infinity War Part I

    Buckeye Jones wrote: : There was a bit too much Guardians of the Galaxy screen time, though I suppose the story demanded it to be so given the third act and its machinations.  Ironically, one of the things I hated about Infinity War was how it effed up the Guardians, which had heretofore been one of my favorite Marvel movie properties. Among other things, they simply didn't have James Gunn's touch here -- and I can only wonder how Gunn will pick up the pieces once this Avengers storyline is over. That being said, I did love the way Thor kept calling Rocket Raccoon "Rabbit".
  16. Peter T Chattaway

    Rambo V

    Link to our thread on Rambo (2008), where this fifth film has been mentioned before. Writer Sean Hood recently tweeted: "Rambo 5 on hold as Sly finishes Expendables 2. He hasn't decided if R5 will be an "Unforgiven" or a "passing of the torch.""
  17. Peter T Chattaway

    Rambo V

    Sylvester Stallone lining up 'Rambo V' (exclusive) Sylvester Stallone is attached to reprise his role as former Green Beret John Rambo in Rambo V, which Millennium Media will bring to Cannes this week. Production on the fifth instalment in the 36-year franchise that famously launched with First Blood in 1982 is scheduled for a September 1 start and will encompass London, Bulgaria, and the Canary Islands. . . . Stallone’s return to action in the long-running series finds him living in a ranch in Arizona, deeply troubled and wrestling with PTSD as he picks up casual work wherever he can. When long-time family friend and estate manager Maria informs Rambo that her grand-daughter has gone missing after crossing into Mexico for a party, he sets off with her to find the youngster. What ensues is a violent descent into hell as Rambo uncovers a sex-trafficking ring. He teams up with a journalist whose half-sister has also been kidnapped and must deploy all his skills to save the girls and bring down a vicious crime lord. . . . Screen Daily, May 5
  18. Peter T Chattaway

    Star Wars: Episode IX

    A new story at the Wall Street Journal says Colin Trevorrow lost the job because Kathleen Kennedy didn't like his script. So it didn't necessarily have anything to do with The Book of Henry or his post-Jurassic World ego, as earlier reports had it. But what I want to know *now* is whether Kennedy was always unhappy with Trevorrow's script, or if she was only upset with the direction it was taking after Carrie Fisher died and the filmmakers were forced to come up with a whole new, Leia-free storyline.
  19. Peter T Chattaway

    Star Wars: Episode IX

    Links to the threads on Episode I, Episode II, Episode III, Episode IV, Episode V, Episode VI, Episode VII, Episode VIII and the 2004 and 2006 editions of Episodes IV-VI on DVD and the 2011 edition of Episodes I-VI on Blu-Ray, as well as The Clone Wars, Rogue One, Rebels and the various rumoured other TV series (plus one quasi-duplicate thread on the comedy series) and spin-off movies. See also the threads on 'Star Wars Debate Redux' (which began as a place to bash Episode II; Jul 8 - Nov 11, 2003), 'Sci fi = spiritual? Star Wars, X2, etc.' (Apr 12-14, 2004), 'Best Star Wars Movie?' (with poll; Apr 18-20, 2004), 'Top 100 Discussion: The Star Wars original trilogy?' (May 6-7, 2004), 'Is Star Wars Blasphemous?' (Jun 15 - Jul 25, 2005), 'Star Wars in 20 minutes' (Aug 8-9, 2006) and 'Star Wars: Uncut' (Apr 2010). - - - Rian Johnson to Write and Direct ‘Star Wars’ 8 — But Not 9 Rian Johnson will write and direct the eighth “Star Wars” movie, inheriting the franchise from J.J. Abrams, according to two individuals with knowledge of the director's plans. Johnson will also write the treatment for the ninth movie, but he will not direct it. TheWrap.com, June 20
  20. Peter T Chattaway

    Sherlock Holmes 3 (2020)

    : No director is yet attached.  That's... interesting. And a gap of nine years between 2 and 3, after a mere two-year gap between 1 and 2? That's even longer than the seven-year gap between The Mummy 2 and 3. (The Mummy 1 and 2 came out only two years apart.)
  21. Peter T Chattaway

    Come Sunday aka Heretics

    Marcus Hinchey penning 'Heretics' Marcus Hinchey is writing the screenplay "Heretics," based on an episode of the public radio series "This American Life," which is being developed as a potential directing gig for Marc Forster. The script will recount the true story of Carlton Pearson, a rising star in the evangelical movement who was ostracized by his own church and declared a heretic after he started preaching that there is no Hell. . . . Forster is currently directing Apparatus' "Machine Gun Preacher" for Lionsgate. . . . Hollywood Reporter, July 13
  22. Peter T Chattaway

    Come Sunday aka Heretics

    FWIW, here's what I wrote on Facebook a couple weeks ago: - - - Come Sunday, starring Chiwetel Ejiofor as Carlton Pearson and Martin Sheen as Oral Roberts, hit Netflix over the weekend. I mentioned the film a few times at my blog when it was in development. I don't know if I'll actually get around to formally reviewing it. But I found it disappointing. When the film was announced, it was said that the film would look at how Pearson had a falling-out with Roberts and others over his belief in universal salvation (i.e. that *everyone* is saved and no one is going to hell). I was intrigued by the possibility of seeing a feature-length drama about a topic that is currently making waves in evangelical circles (cf. my friend Kevin Miller's documentary Hellbound? from a few years ago). But Pearson's change of belief, from hell to not-hell, happens awfully quickly -- in just about a week or two, as far as the movie is concerned -- and, while I loved hearing actual Bible verses quoted in a couple scenes, the film's treatment of the theological issues at stake is ultimately fairly shallow. About as shallow as the proof-texting that the characters on both sides are engaged in. And, ultimately, the movie seems less interested in the question of eternal salvation and/or damnation than it does in the question of embracing homosexuality. Early on, Oral Roberts remarks that he couldn't "save" his eldest son, who committed suicide after coming out as gay. I had somehow never heard about this before (or if I had, I had somehow forgotten it; and I say this as one who, in my teens, read an entire book by Oral Roberts' ex-daughter-in-law on how Oral pressured his *other* son into divorcing her), and I don't deny that there's a lot of drama that could be mined from that, but the moment Martin-Sheen-as-Oral-Roberts brought it up, it felt like a cheap way to signal that Oral is one of the "bad guys" in this story. And then Pearson's friendship with his gay choir leader ends up becoming the movie's main subplot. So, it didn't feel like I was getting the movie that had originally been advertised. And, its treatment of all these themes seemed like it was designed to be as un-challenging as possible to the film's target NPR audience (the film was co-produced by This American Life). Oh well. - - - In the comments, I said, in reply to a (gay) friend: - - - I agree that the opposing characters aren't demonized, exactly, but they are certainly cast in a consistently negative light (e.g. the Jason Segel character worrying that "homosexuals, murderers and rapists" will be saved; again, where the characters stand on homosexuality serves as a sort of litmus test, signaling who the good guys and bad guys are). Just the fact that an openly liberal, openly Catholic guy like Martin Sheen was playing the decidedly non-liberal, non-Catholic Oral Roberts kind of skews things in its own way. (I'd be curious to know if Sheen ever said anything about Roberts while the latter was alive, though I can't think offhand of any reason why he would have needed to.) I concede that the theological discussion within the film may be limited to some degree by the fact that the film takes place entirely within a Pentecostal/charismatic/evangelical milieu. Being "saved" in this context means not going to hell, period, pretty much -- "salvation" is all about justification, with no consideration of sanctification -- but a broader understanding of what salvation *is* might have helped iron out some of the seeming "contradictions" in the Bible passages these characters cite. And that points to one of the main problems I had with the film's depiction of Pearson's arc: he seems to give up on the idea of hell after just a week or two of thinking about it, and he announces this without any warning *in a church service* and even goes on to brazenly declare that there are "contradictions" in the Bible on this point. Like, c'mon. You just don't do that from a pulpit, in that denominational context, without expecting some serious pushback -- especially over verses that *aren't* as "contradictory" as he seems to think they are. (E.g., the verse that says Jesus brought salvation for all people but *especially* those who believe. Why "especially"? Might there be a way there to tease out what the New Testament writers were trying to describe?) I would have a lot more sympathy for Pearson's predicament if this was something he wrestled with over a quasi-long period of time -- and I assume that, in real life, he did -- but, as dramatized, he just comes off as naive and impulsive. And thus the shallow theology weakens the character and, thus, weakens the drama. For me, at any rate.
  23. Peter T Chattaway

    Pixar: The studio, its history and process

    Another of John Lasseter's (female!) lieutenants bites the dust: - - - Lori McAdams, ‘John Lasseter Protector’ And Key Figure In Illegal Wage-Fixing Conspiracy, Is Leaving Pixar Lori McAdams, a longtime veteran of Pixar and one of the studio’s highest-ranking women in executive management, is leaving the company, according to a new report in The Hollywood Reporter. McAdams had been the studio’s vice president of human resources and administration and had worked there for 14 years. The article charges that she was “seen by many as one of Lasseter’s chief protectors.” Her role in protecting Lasseter has not been clearly defined. Her role in another matter though is much more clear: McAdams was one of the key people responsible for maintaining an illegal industry-wide wage-fixing scheme in feature animation that was in large part spearheaded by Walt Disney and Pixar Animation studios president Ed Catmull. The subsequent lawsuits resulted in a $100 million settlement from Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar, and Lucasfilm, in addition to settlements by other corporations. The lawsuits alleged that during her time at Pixar, McAdams repeatedly violated federal antitrust law by working with competing animation studios to artificially suppress the wages of animation workers and prevent artists the freedom to seek higher salaries by moving to other studios. McAdams not only helped set up the “gentleman’s agreements” between studios, but she played the role of enforcer when studios didn’t follow her illegal scheme. . . . The roots of the wage-fixing conspiracy in animation stretch back to the mid-’80s when Pixar and Lucasfilm started an agreement to restrain their competition for the same employees. Perhaps it would be interesting then to note who the head of personnel at Lucasfilm was at the time. None other than McAdams, who worked there from 1984-1998. Cartoon Brew, April 25 What Will Disney And Pixar Do About John Lasseter? As we near the end of John Lasseter’s six-month “sabbatical” from his role as chief creative officer at Walt Disney and Pixar animation studios, Disney CEO Bob Iger has still not revealed what he intends to do. The Walt Disney Company’s public response to Lasseter’s “missteps” has been nonexistent, creating the impression that they simply do not care about women employees or how they are treated. It’s also completely at odds with how every other entertainment conglomerate has dealt recently with sexual harassment situations, from Comcast-NBCUniversal’s handling of Matt Lauer to Fox’s handling of Louis C.K. In nearly every instance, those companies have issued a swift response by launching an investigation into the accusations, and then based on those results, taken the appropriate action. . . . Any investigation into Lasseter would potentially implicate a large group of Disney and Pixar’s executives all the way up to Bob Iger, who saw no problem with allowing Lasseter to act as he did until the #MeToo movement made Lasseter’s behavior indefensible. “All of his behavior was condoned,” an animator told The Hollywood Reporter’s Kim Masters in a lengthy piece published yesterday. “It wasn’t just the drinking. It was his never having grown up. Some of senior management believed that was part of the secret ingredient when really the secret ingredient was a group of people.” Masters’ piece doesn’t exactly reveal anything new about Lasseter’s behavior toward women — much has already been said — but it sheds new light on his substance abuse problems and ego issues. . . . The article also discusses Lasseter’s treatment of other artists and colleagues who he bullied and belittled. Among the people allegedly victimized by Lasseter were animator Glen Keane and producer Don Hahn, both of whom were “pushed aside” by Lasseter. “John treated [Don] like shit,” a Disney veteran is quoted telling The Hollywood Reporter. (Both Keane and Hahn declined to comment to the Reporter.) Lasseter’s penchant for taking credit for the work of others is also exposed in the Reporter piece. Jorgen Klubien, who co-created Cars with Joe Ranft, told the Reporter that Lasseter would often repeat what other colleagues said, but the person taking notes included only Lasseter’s words, making it appear that Lasseter had originated thoughts that he was only repeating. . . . In a 2014 interview with a Danish publication, Klubien, who has known Lasseter since the late 1970s, foresaw much of what is happening right now: "John is about to explode from obesity and red wine these days. That’s because he’s living a lie. Like some strange Scrooge McDuck, he’s bathing in awards and money and people worshipping him because they think he’s made the whole thing. But one day the truth will come out. I’m not the only one he’s lying to." . . . Cartoon Brew, April 26
  24. Peter T Chattaway

    Star Trek 14

    The headline is missing one important qualification: Clarkson would be the first female director in the *movie* franchise's history. The Star Trek franchise as a whole has already had a number of female directors on its TV shows, natch (the earliest of whom directed her first TNG episode in 1989). - - - ‘Star Trek 4’: S.J. Clarkson Becomes the First Female Director in Franchise’s History (EXCLUSIVE) S.J. Clarkson has been tapped to direct “Star Trek 4,” making her the first female to helm a film in the “Star Trek” franchise. Paramount Pictures had no comment. The studio announced at CinemaCon in Las Vegas that it was planning a fourth movie with Chris Hemsworth, who appeared as Chris Pine’s father in 2009’s “Star Trek.” Zachary Quinto is also set to return. Paramount is developing another “Star Trek” film from J.J. Abrams and Quentin Tarantino, but sources say it is still being written and would come after the fourth movie. While details on “Star Trek 4” are vague, sources say a key plot point sees Pine’s character running into his father (Hemsworth) in a time travel ploy. J.D. Payne and Patrick McKay penned the screenplay. Abrams and Lindsey Weber will produce through Bad Robot Productions, while David Ellison and Dana Goldberg of Skydance Media will executive produce. . . . Variety, April 26
  25. Peter T Chattaway

    Star Trek 14

    Links to our threads on the original TV series (1966-1969), the original movie series (1979-2002), Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987-1994), Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993-1999), Star Trek: Enterprise (2001-2005), Star Trek (2009), Star Trek into Darkness (2013), Star Trek Beyond (2016) and Star Trek: Discovery (2017-present). These sequels have taken SO LONG to get made (the original films came out at intervals of 2 to 2.5 years, but there was a 4-year gap between the two JJ Abrams films and there will be a 3-year gap between Into Darkness and the next film), it has affected the contract negotiations: - - - 'Star Trek 3' Stars Score Big Raises as Kirk and Spock Sign for Fourth Movie (Exclusive) The third installment of the rebooted Star Trek franchise boldly heads into production this week in Vancouver, and its cast is getting a big pay raise. At the same time, the studio behind Star Trek Beyond quietly has locked up two key players for a potential fourth installment. Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that Paramount and producer-financier Skydance Entertainment recently completed last-minute re-negotiations with the Star Trek stars, a move that has added as much as $10 million-$15 million to the budget. The project’s slow development process may have been partly to blame, as well as the rising star power of the actors, especially Chris Pine and Zoe Saldana. When the original cast — Pine, Saldana, Zachary Quinto, Karl Urban, Simon Pegg, Anton Yelchin and John Cho — signed on for the movie that re-launched the franchise in 2009, they did so with options for two sequels. Despite the fact that studios often will give stars big new deals in case of success, no re-negotiations took place for 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness. Instead, the Trek cast is said to have received only the nominal raises built into their original contracts. According to sources, Paramount argued that the J.J. Abrams-directed 2009 movie, while well-received, was not a huge blockbuster, grossing $385.7 million (a relative pittance compared to Paramount’s billion-dollar Transformers series or even its Mission: Impossible movies). After Into Darkness grossed $467 million, Paramount was ready to jump back in for a third movie. But Star Trek 3 ran into delays in the development process: Roberto Orci spent the better part of 2014 writing the script (he also was slated to direct) only to have execs then decide to scrap it and part ways with the filmmaker. In January, Pegg and Dark Blue co-creator Doug Jung were brought in to write a new script. With Fast & Furious franchise director Justin Lin — seen as a get —on board to direct, things were looking like they were back on track. That's when the actors' deals became an issue. Paramount was again only looking to give nominal raises based on the original contracts, but some of the stars and their representatives argued that seven years had passed since the deals were struck back in 2007. Under California law, a personal services contract cannot bind someone for more than seven years. That meant the old deals arguably were invalid as of 2014. . . . Hollywood Reporter, June 26
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