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Buckeye Jones

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    2,302
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About Buckeye Jones

  • Rank
    Killer of threads

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ed_aisela
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    In America
  • Interests
    any roasted coffee, home renovation, travel, raising two boys, church, Swiffer, Charmin

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Market Research
  • About my avatar
    I think it's me.
  • Favorite movies
    (today) Empire Strikes Back, LOTR:FOTR, TT EE, ROTK, The Searchers, Braveheart, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Spartacus
  • Favorite music
    Copland: Appalachain Spring, Orff: Carmina Burana, U2 Joshua Tree, Zooropa, Achtung Baby, Rich Mullins, Resphigi: Pines of the Rome, almost anything from or by Pepe Romero; Buckeye Battle Cry, The Ohio State University Marching Band
  • Favorite creative writing
    JRR Tolkien LOTR/Silmarillion, the Hobbit; Tom Wright, Jesus and the Victory of God, Resurrection of the Son of God, For All God's Worth; Edmund Morris TR biographies. David McCullough's John Adams biography, Remains of the Day, Ishiguro.
  • Favorite visual art
    John Volck's stuff. And Dan Sorensen's.

Recent Profile Visitors

4,306 profile views
  1. Buckeye Jones

    Avengers: Infinity War Part I

    Obviously when Cable and Thanos meet, the entire universe will collapse.
  2. Buckeye Jones

    Outlaw/King

    I can kinda see an artistic reason for the swimming scene, especially with Bruce’s comments that he was tired of hiding and now coming out into the open. I still tend to hit the FF button on sex scenes; typically it’s imagery I don’t need in my noggin. Benefits of Netflix, I guess. and agreed on Hell or High Water. Needed some of that tight storytelling here.
  3. Buckeye Jones

    Outlaw/King

    Anyone catch this at TIFF and then see the Netflix edit? I had high hopes but didn’t think this came together well. Pine’s Bruce, while displaying a remarkable resistance to shrinkage, still came across as limp. He just was not a compelling leader that inspired revolutionary fervor regardless of the script’s insistence that he did. Even though the story is more accurate, Braveheart was a much much better movie. I know it faces it’s criticism here for its revenge plot and ridiculous affair with the Queen (justly deserved critique, that one) but Gibson’s flick breathes an expansive energy and Gibson’s Wallace was believable as a leader of men. Florence Pugh was solid, and I’d read one take that suggests a film about her would have really had potential but but alas she was shuttled off for leverage. its a shame; could have been a good epic but at the end it felt small and slight. For those that saw both edits, any key improvements?
  4. Buckeye Jones

    Church matters

    That’s a fair point. I am not sure what contact we’ve had with the landlord in the past. The building is larger (20+ units), and my suspicion is that the entire place is infested. It would be good to know a cost to treat the whole thing, at least to know what we could help with.
  5. Buckeye Jones

    Church matters

    First some context. I realize that this is an off topic for this group. But I figure there may be some resources. My church serves a very diverse socioeconomic congregation. One of our long term members has become infested with bed bugs such that you can see them on him. Other members have found them when sitting near him. He has some limited mental ability due to age and injury. Ideally we would help him by finding new living situation and furniture. This may not be possible due to any number of reasons, not least that he may refuse help. City ordinances do not allow for landlord citations for bedbugs. Anyone have resources or advice? We end up treating the area he sits in weekly after services, but are now at a point where we are considering requesting that he refrain from entering services. I feel my heart churn to think this but am worried that his infestation will affect others.
  6. Buckeye Jones

    Gladiator 2

    I hope they use Nick Cave’s script.
  7. Buckeye Jones

    The Raid: Redemption

    This is now on Netflix US. So is Rumble in the Bronx. knowing that Evans was trying to make the violence felt—I think it misses the mark. Yeah—you feel the violence, every landed punch, every stab of the knife, but then the hero just takes a licking and keeps on ticking. For example, if I took a machete fight out a window for a three story fall, I don’t think I could get up and then go take on another full room of gun wielding bad guys. I may just have to take a break, gets some morphine or something, first. But as a adrenaline shot of action, an indestructible hero is a price you pay for some pretty impressive choreography. That fight on the metal table in the drug lab! The brothers vs Mad Dog left a bit to be desired. Why would they take turns? Eventually they worked together but for the first 2/3 of that fight it was like a tag team match. Use disproportionate odds to your advantage in a martial arts film! Plus I don’t think a fluorescent bulb is that strong.
  8. Buckeye Jones

    A&F Site News -- Please Read

    Whoa. Cool.
  9. Buckeye Jones

    The Good Place

    This show is really good. Perfectly cast. Like Lost, though, it needs to ensure it’s working to an end.
  10. Buckeye Jones

    Wind River

    I don’t know. Watched this last night and while it had its moments, a few things really stuck out like a sore thumb. First, the initial scene with the grieving father was a standout. Then, the editing of the shootout (both of them, actually) was solid and cathartic. Finally, the grieving brother and Renner’s conversation was well done. However, this had some issues. Spoilers abound. Did business make this a white savior story? I get the logic behind the Olson role (naive outsider). But Renner’s character could have easily been cast as a native role. I don’t get it. But the main plot—the oil rig security team is a bunch of evil FBI murdering native killing rapists—makes zero sense. Here is a group of people who exist just to shoot and exact vengeance upon. They have no motivation to start a shootout. There’s nothing they accomplish that would not have been better served by just stonewalling. Let’s say their ambush was successful and they were able to kill all the cops without any losses. Then what? Makes no narrative sense. And how convenient that Renner’s cats are camped out on the same trail and the same mountain as the side trail from the drug house which is also the same trail as the cats, the deceased boyfriend, the deceased girl, and the trail back to the rigs. And that Renner goes back up the trail one last time to run into the killers trail right next to the cats’ lair. Rolling my eyes. But that was a tense shootout, and stuff.
  11. Buckeye Jones

    Examples of "Cinematic Parables"?

    Pale Rider
  12. Buckeye Jones

    Examples of "Cinematic Parables"?

    The Grey (the wolves are cancer)
  13. Buckeye Jones

    Examples of "Cinematic Parables"?

    Babette’s Feast Ikiru
  14. Buckeye Jones

    Star Wars: Boba Fett spin-off movie

    If this was a Dengar movie, I'd be in. But ain't gonna pay money for someone who gets belched on by a sarlaac.
  15. Buckeye Jones

    Star Wars: Han Solo origin story spin-off

    I'd be very curious to know how this version differs from the Lord version, aside from the Bettany/Williams switcheroo. Were the clunky parts (the final act, especially) clunky because they pieced this thing together from two sources, or because Kasdan & Son wrote a clunky script? And I really would have loved to have seen the dude who played young Harrison Ford in the Adaline movie play Han in this movie. He just seemed to have the same knack at wry-ness that Ford has. There's one line in this film that made me react to it with a huge eye-roll, at the end, when one character says, "You're the good guy". To me, that tells me the filmmakers didn't understand their characters---at all. And that, more than anything else, is why I think Solo fails for me. It doesn't understand its own story.
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