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Stephen Lamb

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Everything posted by Stephen Lamb

  1. I interviewed David about his new book and his "attention collection," among other things, for the Art House blog: http://www.arthouseamerica.com/blog/attention-collections-and-sneaky-religious-stories-an-interv.html
  2. A 4K restoration of the five hour version of this is playing in theaters now as a part of the Janus Films Wenders Retrospective: http://www.janusfilms.com/wenders/ I saw it last night at the Belcourt in Nashville, with a crowd of about 40, and loved it. Next week is Wings of Desire.
  3. Man, I love this staging of Cedarwood Road:
  4. Do we not have a topic for this yet? Written and directed by siblings Ronit and Shlomi Elkabetz, it's currently at 100% at Rotten Tomatoes. I hadn't heard about it until I saw that it is playing in Nashville next week at our indie theater.
  5. The new Beth Hart album is streaming at Billboard. I'm a couple of listens in and really liking it.
  6. And here's Robert Glasper talking about his role in the project:
  7. Jeff, I think a pretty good place to start would be Mary Stewart Van Leeuwen's "A Sword Between the Sexes? C.S. Lewis and the Gender Debates." Eldredge builds a lot of his arguments on stuff he got from Lewis, and Van Leeuwen does an excellent job of showing what influenced Lewis's thinking and how it developed over the years. Eldredge (and that strain of masculine Christianity thinking) also take a lot from Robert Bly and the mythopoetic men's movement, so some reading in that area is helpful. There are some good essays in the collection "Women Respond to the Men's Movement," for example. Looking a little further back to the development of some of these ideas in modern American Christianity, I found Margaret Lamberts Bendroth's "Fundamentalism and Gender: 1875 to the Present" and Betty A. Deberg's "Ungodly Women: Gender and the First Wave of American Fundamentalism" to be essential reading. For an introduction to a different way to think about religion to give to someone raised on Eldredge, etc., my favorite book is Dorothee Soelle's Theology for Skeptics. (David and Sarah Dark introduced me to Soelle's work, incidentally). It's fairly short, and a good introduction to why using violent language and exclusively masculine language to talk about God is so often harmful.
  8. Stephen Lamb

    Wild (2014)

    I read the book and liked it, so I'll give this a chance.
  9. Neither link works for me, either. I'm think I'm a "member," but it says I don't have permission to view that forum.
  10. Stephen Lamb

    In Bloom

    I saw it a month or two ago, and really liked it. I thought it would make a nice double-feature with Wadjda.
  11. I just read this again, in preparation for writing about it for the Art House blog, and my appreciation only grew. http://www.arthouseamerica.com/blog/notes-from-a-pilgrimage.html
  12. The full album's streaming here: http://www.stereogum.com/1538311/stream-arcade-fire-reflektor/mp3s/album-stream/
  13. Saw this last week, and it will easily be near the top of my end-of-the-year list. The closing shot took me from liking the film to loving it. In this interview with the director, he explains the dedication, which I had missed when watching it. http://www.indiewire.com/article/jem-cohen-explains-why-museum-hours-will-help-you-grapple-with-art-and-life
  14. The pope likes San Lorenzo? Cool. Guess this means my choice to buy a San Lorenzo jersey when I lived in Argentina ten years ago, instead of becoming a fan of La Boca or River, the two biggest teams that most of my classmates supported, was the right way to go.
  15. Just voted. I'm excited to see the list (as long as it includes The Loneliest Planet and Certified Copy, of course). And A History of Violence, and...
  16. It was a blast. The show didn't start until midnight, but even so, it was sold out, with a crowd that obviously knew and loved Big Star's music. Here's the set list for the night (the strings played on about half the songs): Feel Back of a Car For You I'm in Love with a Girl Take Care You n Your Sister Blue Moon Give Me Another Chance The Ballad of El Goodo Way Out West Try Again Baby's Beside Me Jesus Christ Thirteen Don't Lie to Me In the Street September Gurls ----------- Encore: Kanga Roo Thank You Friends
  17. For anyone near Nashville: as part of the Americana Music Festival, we're doing a "Songs of Big Star" set tonight. The band includes several of the same members as the concert I mentioned above - Chris Stamey of the db's, Jody Stephens (Big Star's drummer), and Mike Mills (REM) on bass - along with a string quintet and flute and bassoon. I'll be conducting for the songs the strings play on. I think we're doing songs from all the Big Star albums. Should be fun. Here's one article about the show.
  18. Here's one reason I loved seeing it on the big screen: the reactions of those around me to what was happening on the screen. It reminded me of the best aspects of communal movie watching, which I don't experience often. Most of the movies I want to see play at this art-house theater, and most of the time there are only five or ten other people in the theater. This was different, a sold-out showing by people who'd been looking forward to it, and throughly enjoyed it. Yep, I think the Belcourt is one of the best things about Nashville. One thing that makes it so great is that it is a non-profit theater, meaning I sometimes see a film there that is in my top five for the year, and then I'll notice that it only played in 8 theaters in the country, or something. Another bonus: if you're a member (which starts at just $45 per year), you get matinee pricing anytime you go. Add a beer for a couple of dollars (they have several local brews on tap), and you still end up paying less than you do watching something down at the multiplex.
  19. Christian, I sawMoonrise Kingdom on Saturday night, and Your Sister's Sister on Sunday. I liked both, but would see Moonrise Kingdom again before Sister. Both of these are currently playing at our local arthouse theater. Every showing of Moonrise Kingdom over the weekend was sold out, I think, and they posted this on their Facebook page yesterday:
  20. The mp3 album is only $1.99 on Amazon today: http://www.amazon.com/Slipstream/dp/B007S1RGUQ/
  21. And now, it's Damon Lindelof (of Lost fame) co-writing the script with Perrotta, and running the show, if it moves ahead.
  22. Anyone heard her new, self-titled record? It came out yesterday. She co-produced it, I think, and is putting it out herself, without a label. After a couple listens, I like it a good bit more than her last couple, but I haven't spent enough time with it yet to say anything else. I just saw her play a short set at the indie record store here in Nashville, Grimey's, and she still sounds great live.
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