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jfutral

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Everything posted by jfutral

  1. Never been a fan, myself, although I have enjoyed Philip Glass. Modern choreographers seem to love his stuff. Probably not the same thing, though. However, this past Christmas I heard this crazy techno/electronic-esque cover of _Dance of the Sugarplum Fairy_. As someone who lights any where from 2-6 different Nutcrackers a year from pretty much Thanksgiving through New Years, I can't tell you how much this tickled me. I want the recording, but I can't find it. None of this is probably what you're talking about, but it was what came to mind. Joe
  2. Sorry, I tried to draw a similarity and connection there. Apparently I didn't draw the line very clearly. Joe
  3. Boy I can't remember when this discussion hasn't been taking place. Read Charlie Peacock's _At the Crossroads_. Go back further when Amy Grant first released a "secular" album. Find interviews with people like Michael W. Smith, P.O.D., Larry Norman, Glenn Kaiser, Andrae Crouch you name it. I know it may not seem the same, but it is. I've got piles of interviews and articles about this stuff as far back as, well, way back. The music business is a business. There is no escaping it. Whenever someone puts a price on something and tries to sell it, the thought process of how to to sell the product starts. And one music business "fact", customers like to know what they are buying (what they really mean is _they_ like to know what they are selling) and that means things have to be "categorized", spiritual implications be _____ed! Not only that, it is human nature. Somehow we feel far more comfortable if we can "define" things certain ways. "A place for everything, everything in its place." Anyone who thinks selling music is about ministry is fooling themselves. It's about making money. Does it have to be that way? Well, find some other way to fund the recording, distribution, and getting the word out (for those who don't like the idea of "marketing"). Then you can pull a Keith Green and give all those albums away for free. BTW, Keith acknowledged his error last I checked. I could be wrong, remembering it wrong, or mischaracterizing his statement, but I don't think so. As a Christian, I despise the term "Christian music" or CCM. Of course it makes it easier to communicate certain ideas, but ultimately it is a marketing term. It doesn't really mean there is necessarily anything really Christian about a particular song that falls within that "genre", but it makes it easier for the producers to determine a marketing plan. And even "Christian music" or CCM really isn't sufficient, especially when it includes everything from rock to metal to easy listening, etc. One of the big mistakes was falling for and perpetuating the whole "secular vs sacred" split. Bad enough we give into the notion of classes. This is a far greater issue than just "Gospel for Blacks; Christian for Whites." Just my thoughts, Joe Futral
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