Ambler

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About Ambler

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  1. Lots of misconceptions and misinformation in your post but none is worth arguing about as I suspect much of your antipathy to me is down to a simple difference in cultures. I'm hardly the first to observe that England and America are divided by a common language yet it's a shame about your humour bypass. Then again, the idea that I require your approval or am here for your education is amusing. As for pubic hair, it's interesting that it disturbs you. Oddly enough, it's its absence that tends to disturb me. No doubt you are a follower of Ruskin. I will grant that you are correct in one respect, however: I have no intention of 'sharing', as you put it, with a bunch of strangers: emotional incontinence is one social inadequacy I'd prefer not to develop. I came here to discuss the arts not my latest crisis of faith, divorce or other disappointment. Unfortunately, I see you are incapable of separating the personal from the philosophical so I must find another land. Perhaps I'll adopt 'Persona non grata' as my next nom de plume.
  2. In the new version everyone under 30 is exterminated. Sounds good to me.
  3. No. It was a most serious offence. Heresy by thought, I'd say. EDIT: yet another typo.
  4. Well. There’s a lot of blustering and self-righteousness going on in this thread, but I enjoyed reading it all the more for that. My own grand objection to Antichrist is somewhat less spiritual; admiring it cost me the use of a nice retreat on the Thames. For the last few years I’ve spent part of each summer writing and punting in Richmond, catsitting for a trustafarian while she visited family in New York. That came to an abrupt end in 2009 when I observed that Antichrist was film making of the highest order. Now, many things are socially acceptable in fashionable circles, but Lars von Trier isn’t one of them. Since then I ‘get creative’ in a poky two-bedroomed flat in Stoke Newington. I can’t even get a signal on my iPhone. Von Trier must be stopped.
  5. Don't take it too personally, Ambler. This thread is not about one person. Much better to name names than leave us dangling. I'm happy to go elsewhere if that's the consensus. In truth I never got over the sneaking feeling that I should be paid for what I write. Old fashioned, I know.
  6. Argento intended Suspiria to be an experience rather than a conventional narrative. It probably has more in common with a 1970s concert by Pink Floyd in that respect - sound and vision rather than three-act play. Re 2001, until November last year I would have agreed with you. However, on what was probably my tenth big screen viewing (at the BFI in London) I was suddenly reminded of what the late Leslie Halliwell said about the film: 'It's somewhere between hypnotic and hypnotically boring." The same went for Stalker, which I saw in Leicester Square the same week. Time to revise my film lists I suppose...
  7. Thus, 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968) has UK as it's country of origin. STAR WARS (1977) is a USA production despite being filmed at Elstree Studios. A film like CHILDREN OF MEN (2006) was a co-production between a UK and US studio, so would be considered a UK/US co-production, even though the director's country of origin is Mexico. (As I learned when trying to categorize an academic paper I presented on the film). I'm sure you're right. It's just that I tend to find the creative part of filmmaking more interesting than its finances. (Not that financing can't be creative ...) Thus to me 2001 or Clockwork Orange might be regarded as UK/US productions, but on the basis that their writers and director were British and American respectively.
  8. Hmmm, I wonder who this could be aimed at? Are civility and civilisation related? If so, this is worth a look.
  9. Faulkes on Fiction claims that Emma comes as close to perfection as any novel in the English language, so I'm giving it another go. No car chases or gun fights so far.
  10. I suppose that depends on whether you buy into auteur theory or not. On your basis, I'm saddened to see that we'll have to claim the Star Wars toy factory.
  11. I was referencing Sir Alfred in my comment about people talking, but I'm sure Ryan knew that. We may not be close (I don't think we agree on the merits of a single film!), but I do respect his knowledge. Indeed, I pushed for his appointment as moderator on a (now defunct) film forum we once frequented though he may not have been aware of that. As for Argento, unless you've seen his work as it's intended (and it's been cut to ribbons, particularly in the USA) and on a 20 x 26m screen, then I think it's unfair to judge. Whilst it's true that Argento does not have much regard for characterisation or narrative, neither are essential for a great film. After all, I'm sure you've all occasionally enjoyed a sunset purely for its visual splendour. EDIT: typo
  12. Might be interesting to read Robert Heinlein though I've never thought of him as a serious writer. (My only previous exposure was Starship Troopers, which came a couple of years before Stranger.) Anyway. happy to give that one a go.
  13. The world doesn't need any more films of people talking. The visuals are what matters. I imagine that your lack of film vocabulary is what leads you to believe that Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf is a great film. One might make the argument that WAVW it is a great play, but it certainly is not a great film.
  14. Escape from Alcatraz. A good film from a bad year.
  15. It seems I am the only man in the world who remembers Christopher Miles' adaptation of The Virgin and the Gypsy.