Jump to content

Lauren Wilford

Member
  • Posts

    97
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Lauren Wilford

  1. I'm going to second Alissa's nomination from way back when: The Wolfpack. I just caught it on Netflix, and it's such a fascinating portrait of an overprotective parenting style and what it does to children. The way that all the kids latch onto the movies that they watch seemed like such a powerful metaphor for the way that the stories we're told in childhood stick with us. A kind of real life, less bleak, more redemptive Dogtooth. I see it being a good Christian humanist film in the way it moves toward affirming that the world is a good place in which we belong, rather than something from which we have to hide-- a temptation for many Christian parents.
  2. I also just finished A Pigeon Sat on Branch Reflecting on Existence, and wow. What a singular experience. Reminded me of last year's The Strange Little Cat in terms of the meticulous compositions, long takes, silences, and dwelling in life's fanciful, bizarre moments. I'm somewhat hesitant to nominate since it's kind of prickly and arty, but it does touch on loneliness, cruelty, and kindness. I wouldn't recommend it for a Christian audience specifically, so I guess maybe I'm not nominating it, but do everyone give it a watch-- thanks for the screener, Colin!
  3. I'd like to second Experimenter. An interesting self-aware approach to the biopic and loads to think about ethically. Obedience is a thorny topic for Christians, as we consider it a virtue, and the abuses of authority are always an important issue for Christians to contend with. Going Clear deals with a lot of the same stuff, but the artistry of Experimenter puts it ahead of that one for me. It also goes on from that to contend with issues of calling and personal worth.
  4. Indiewire's got lots of critics on things they think people should catch up with before the end of the year. Could be useful. http://blogs.indiewire.com/criticwire/criticwire-survey-the-2015-movies-you-have-to-catch-up-on-20151113
  5. I don't remember much conversation about SotS last year, but if it was considered for such lists in 2014 then perhaps I should rethink it. It received a release that included Seattle in the spring, but I'm willing to concede on it if more people think of it as a 2014 thing.
  6. I think that films that got a wide/limited US release in 2014 should probably not be eligible, and that would include Gareth's suggestions there. I think the conversation needs to move forward from those, or the list might end up looking confused.
  7. Hi jurors! Happy to be here, though I'll definitely need to be doing a lot of catching up the next couple of months. Nomination: Song of the Sea (not sure if the release date works out. Technically 2014 but didn't get a limited US release till 2015, I think). Seconds: The End of the Tour Far From the Madding Crowd (I gather that you don't second things that have already been seconded?)
  8. Hey A&F'ers-- if you're interested in chatting during the show, unfortunately, you can't do it here this year-- something about our boards needing updating. BUT, we have a solution. You can join the chat at this link. Once you get there, you'll need to enter a username, and then pick a color you'd like your name to appear as. Then, once you click "Enter Room," it will take you to a room where you can post messages. But what you really want is to be a part of the chat-- so click "Join Chat" at the bottom of that room! Then you're there. I, your intern, will be available for any technical problems/questions, so just PM me if you have those.
  9. Hey A&F'ers-- if you're interested in chatting during the show, unfortunately, you can't do it here this year-- something about our boards needing updating. BUT, we have a solution. You can join the chat at this link. Once you get there, you'll need to enter a username, and then pick a color you'd like your name to appear as. Then, once you click "Enter Room," it will take you to a room where you can post messages. But what you really want is to be a part of the chat-- so click "Join Chat" at the bottom of that room! Then you're there. I, your intern, will be available for any technical problems/questions, so just PM me if you have those.
  10. Lauren Wilford

    Rosie Thomas

    Rosie is fantastic, and an absolute DOLL in concert. She always makes me cry happy tears. Glad to hear the new album is as good and sweet as I hoped. I'll have to get it.
  11. http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RebelliousPrincess Hope that the theme will be further explored than it looks like from here. The whole "Oh I'm independent marriage is for wimps!" thing is kind of an easy way to get modern audiences to sympathize with a lead female from a former time... like what they did with Alice's character in Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland. Anyway, I have high hopes still, but they had better do something new with the rebellious princess trope. I like that she seems to have this cute rapport with her Dad.
  12. The "WE ARE GOTHAM" chanting that rises over the end is chilling, and actually a bookend to the national anthem at the beginning-- political indeed, and sure to be an interesting installment in Nolan's exploration of groupthink and mobs. The character of crowds is something that comes up time and again in superhero movies, but especially in Nolan's Gotham. I'm convinced the "people of Gotham" are a complex stand-in for a compromised, fallen, redeemable humanity, and whatever influence OWS may have on Dark Knight Rises, I highly doubt Nolan will use the film as a platform for a unilateral class-related message. It's Selena Kyle that has the message about wondering how you could "live so large and leave so little for the rest of us," and the imagery of Bane as revolutionary, the prison break-- it seems like the mob might fall into the temptation to violence to free themselves. Nolan always puts some good ideas in the mouths of his villains, and some bad ones in his heroes. I think Bruce Wayne will finally be taken to task for his excess, but of course that's all double-edged, because Wayne is a martyr for Batman. Anyway, while I look forward to Nolan's exploring the national unrest, I really doubt he's going to come down too hard anywhere-- he's too caught up in people's mixed motives.
  13. I can't imagine it will add much. I expect it will probably add depth to the party scenes, make it seem like there's a lot going on, a lot of dancing and costumes to wade through to get to the people we care about. I can see the value visually when thinking of that, of the mansions and stuff-- Hugo convinced me that 3-D can draw an audience in, not distance them. But I can't imagine any really personal drama/arguments with the added device, unless Luhrman is really judicious with it.
  14. So I know this thread is old and I just stumbled upon it, but it occurred to me while reading the above quote that this void of "men out of the woman's league" is the premise of the Twilight series. Yeah, Kristen Stewart's pretty, but she's no Megan Fox, and Bella in the books constantly characterizes herself as, well, "desperately average." But she cannot peel the men off of her, the two main contenders being exaggeratedly gorgeous. These movies are marketed based on male sex appeal, and the story is about two men fighting over a female character with not a lot of discernible appeal (aside from K-Stew's inherent movie-star glow). So, basically, the out-of-my-league fantasy exists for women too. Not often, but when it does, they come in droves.
  15. Delorean! I hope so too. Such great sounds on that thing.
  16. Baron Cohen and Bonham Carter, reunited to sing unsavory characters (as in Sweeney Todd).
  17. As a person who's heard a lot of the hype but has never set out to read the books, that trailer was pretty darn captivating. I'm sold.
  18. Streaming. I'm just starting it but it's pretty awesome so far.
  19. Elizabethtown seemed super deep to me when I watched it at 15, so I think I'll always have a little place for it in my heart. Crowe has such a weird relationship to sentimentality-- it seems obvious that he's kind of a sentimental person, but Almost Famous just had such a perfect touch, a most lovely application of the "sentimental." Mostly, it just amounted to affection for characters. I wish, wish, wish that he had held onto that restraint.
  20. I never would have associated Crowe without being told-- looks like something from Walden Media. But I'm crossing my fingers that it's just a concept that's really easy to market as sappy. I want to hold out hope...
  21. "This is a story of boy meets girl. The Boy, Tom Hanson, grew up believing that he'd never truly be happy until the day he met the one. This belief stemmed from early exposure to sad British pop music and a total misreading of the movie The Graduate." --500 Days of Summer
  22. What a clearheaded, wise piece of writing. The Graduate has always been a film that felt like it ought to mean something, but had a second act to which I could not place my response. "The only thing energizing the action in The Graduate is inclination." Exactly. That was what I felt strange about, in the film-- the fact that Benjamin just sort of changes course, without a lot of fanfare. The unanswered "why not" of Mrs. Robinson's prohibition-- a very C.S. Lewis-style moral point, and definitely important. So perhaps The Graduate might be of value as a portrait of post-moral malaise, but it loses its power when it tries to be a love story.
  23. This question fascinates me, because it's something I've genuinely never thought about, even though I attend Seattle Pacific "Engaging the Culture, Changing the World" University. Why don't we assume that we are part of culture? That it's a fabric we're woven into as people? Or, as a Christian school (institution, what have you), are we necessarily separate from "the culture" that we are called to engage? Weird.
×
×
  • Create New...