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Found 3 results

  1. The National Theatre Live production of this that plays in cinema houses this time of year is excellent. Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller (or as I refer to them, the 2 Sherlocks) play The Monster and Dr. Frankenstein. When it was on stage the two would swap roles each night. If you have a chance to cath this before Holloween, I highly recommend it.
  2. Well now that this film has nabbed the People's Choice Award at TIFF, I guess that makes it a serious awards contender. (Previous winners include 12 Years a Slave and Silver Linings Playbook...) I spend a morning breakfast having another guy covering the festival argue that this was the big studio film to come out of the festival, but I just didn't see it. Guess he was right. Anyhow, here's my more reserved take.
  3. Has nobody seen this? It's showing on BBC2 (Friday evenings), and has been by far the most talked-about TV in Britain this month. It's based on a trilogy of novels by Ford Madox Ford (who also wrote The Good Soldier), adapted by (my favourite living) playwright Tom Stoppard, and stars Sherlock himself, Benedict Cumberbatch, alongside Rebecca Hall. Is this not airing in the US? A few scattered impressions: - Rebecca Hall is absolutely magnificent; I've been impressed by her in other work,but personally I think she takes it to another level here; it doesn't hurt that she gets most of the best dialogue, but the way she phrases even her most difficult lines, the subtlety of emotion she conveys is wonderful. - It's great to have a writer like Stoppard working in TV - I'd make a contrast here with Julian Fellowes' writing in Downton Abbey; I enjoy it, but you always know exactly what everyone's going to say - even the rhythm in which they will say it is measured to the last cadence. With Stoppard on the other hand there's more sense of freedom and 'danger' to the dialogue, more of an edge. E.g. “There are times when a woman hates a man. I have walked behind a man’s back and nearly screamed with the desire to sink my nails into the veins of his neck. And Sylvia’s got it worse than I.” In my book that's great writing... - The whole thing looks gorgeous, of course; I think that's pretty much a given for BBC period drama. As to the overall storyline, I think I'll wait to comment until the last episode airs this Friday.