Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Charles Laughton'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • The Arts
    • Film
    • Music
    • Television & Radio
    • Literature & Creative Writing
    • Visual Art, Architecture, & Design
    • Theater & Dance
    • Broad Brush -- The Arts in General
    • Announcements
  • The Wider World
    • Faith Matters
    • The Good Life
    • Science & Technology
    • Games
    • Catch-All
  • About You, About Us
    • About IMAGE
    • About this Website
    • Short-Term Parking

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Twitter


Location


Interests


Occupation


About my avatar


Favorite movies


Favorite music


Favorite creative writing


Favorite visual art

Found 1 result

  1. theoddone33

    The Night of the Hunter (1955)

    I looked for an existing topic but came up empty. Is there an ahem coming? I just watched this as part of my "catch up on cinema" initiative, and I have to say that it was great. I'll certainly never be able to hear or sing Leaning on the Everlasting Arms again without thinking of the dependably creepy Harry Powell. The scene where he rode across the horizon in silloutte while singing was quite simply superb. On a technical level I was very impressed with how well this film created suspense, though at some times the suspense it built up didn't match up to the story. On a spiritual level I'm not quite sure I've got a handle on the film completely. I suppose a great way to drive home the point that children can endure a great deal is to portray about the craziest and most scarring ordeal a child can go through. I'm not sure I agree with the "oh they'll be ok, they're children" idea the film seemed to put forth. Honestly it's more interesting to me as an early version of Frailty than as a treatise on childlike faith. But I'm almost certain I missed something.
×