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Found 3 results

  1. Darren H

    Holy Motors

    Holy Motors, the first feature-length film from Leos Carax since POLA X (1999), just got the highest scores of any film so far at Cannes from two people whose tastes I trust (and whose tastes are very different from each other). Mike D'Angelo: Holy Motors (Carax): 88. Holy shit. Blake Williams: Holy Motors - so singularly weird and exhilaratingly cinematic that it doesn't even matter what it means. Awesome. (8.5)
  2. Now streaming on Netflix Instant. I know, right?
  3. Crow

    Tokyo! (2008)

    Has anyone seen this? A collection of three short films from three directors inspired by the city. Michel Gondry explores interior spaces and human relationships, with a twist based on his unique style. Leos Carax gives a unique spin on the Godzilla myth. Joon-ho Bong (who directed The Host) looks at the Hikikomori culture, of lonely people who have shut themselves inside their apartments, and what happens when one man ventures outside. Having had a chance to see this in an actual theater in town, I enjoyed all three films and how their interesting explorations of Japanese culture, especially after seeing the J-POP program at Flickerings a couple of years. Besides, anything by Gondry is a treat.
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