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The Tree of Life (2011)

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Whoa!

I can't take this much longer.

That is pretty nifty, but it is really odd to see a Malick film getting this kind of publicity treatment.


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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For those who want a better, higher-res look at the panel with the dinosaurs, the Two Ways through Life Tumblr just posted one:

tumblr_ljymkiE4f91qiotuao1_1280.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAJ6IHWSU3BX3X7X3Q&Expires=1303545578&Signature=rkPWOoPl4IV%2FINc5aLEUNphSZeM%3D


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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OK. I just saw the trailer in front of Win Win and thought, "OK. We'll see." But the pic above has completely thrown me for a loop.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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Huh. Can't wait to hear what people think of this one. I wonder if it's the one that loses Malick fans but makes him a kadejillionbillion dollas.

Edited by Persona

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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Think of the "creation of the universe" moment in ADAPTATION.

That is a hard-won moment. Good reference.


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Soundtrack streaming at Amazon, according to this article. I'm looking at the Amazon page now, and it looks like it's just samples of each track.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Entertainment Weekly has the first clip from the film -- in which we see how everyone in Brad Pitt's family is happy when Brad Pitt isn't home.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Yeah, that's how The Playlist tweeted it:

Watch: First Clip From 'Tree Of Life' Reveals Everyone Is Happier When Brad Pitt Isn't Around http://dlvr.it/QdS0R

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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LibrarianDeb wrote:

: But seriously, the clip looks awesome.

Really? It just seemed kinda "there" to me. But then I'm more interested in seeing how this 1950s suburbia story connects to the bigger themes of planets colliding and dinosaurs roaring etc.

: Is it selfish to not want to see this with a general audience?

Heh. I've been wondering about this film's box-office potential, actually. If we bracket off animated films (2003's Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas) and movies in which he had only a bit part (2002's Full Frontal and Confessions of a Dangerous Mind), virtually every Brad Pitt film for the past decade has grossed over $135 million worldwide (and sometimes substantially more than that); even the arthouse flicks that did modest business over here, like Babel, have still passed the century mark overseas. The one giant exception to this is 2007's The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, which topped out at $15 million worldwide.

It's difficult to say what Malick's track record is in this area, since he's only made four films, two of which were produced way back in the '70s. But for what it's worth, 1998's The Thin Red Line grossed $98.1 million worldwide and 2005's The New World grossed $30.5 million.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Whoa.

Remember that Malick-focused blog - All Things Shining - that was supposed to be connected to a book project? (It was mentioned earlier in the thread.)

It's gone, leaving its reader to wonder what exactly this is about.

Screen-shot-2011-05-04-at-6.19.38-PM.png

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Just got notice that the ONLY advance screening of this film in D.C. will be on a weekday at 2:30 in the afternoon.

As I told my editor, if it isn't based on a comic book and/or doesn't have a number at the end of its title, the film is relegated to second-tier status in terms of audience interest, ruling out evening screenings.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Most films that aren't guaranteed box office hits get their screenings at noon on weekdays in Seattle, FWIW.

And I have my screening invite in hand. Hard to believe it's finally here.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Christian wrote:

: As I told my editor, if it isn't based on a comic book and/or doesn't have a number at the end of its title, the film is relegated to second-tier status in terms of audience interest, ruling out evening screenings.

Would you really WANT to see this film at an evening screening, though? I mean, the audiences at those things tend to be kind of boorish, especially when the film is "challenging" on some level. I remember all too well the moron sitting a few rows back from me during an evening preview of David Cronenberg's A History of Violence, who kept yakking through the movie and saying things like "Is it a comedy? Is it a drama? I don't get it!" and then loudly gave the movie two thumbs down when the movie was over.

Note: I am referring specifically to people who attend preview screenings, not regular screenings after a film has gone into general release. The audiences at those latter screenings might not be better, necessarily, but previews tend to attract people who have nothing invested in the movie, people who simply thought "Hey, I just won a free movie ticket!" and went to the movie unawares.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Christian wrote:

: As I told my editor, if it isn't based on a comic book and/or doesn't have a number at the end of its title, the film is relegated to second-tier status in terms of audience interest, ruling out evening screenings.

Would you really WANT to see this film at an evening screening, though? I mean, the audiences at those things tend to be kind of boorish, especially when the film is "challenging" on some level. I remember all too well the moron sitting a few rows back from me during an evening preview of David Cronenberg's A History of Violence, who kept yakking through the movie and saying things like "Is it a comedy? Is it a drama? I don't get it!" and then loudly gave the movie two thumbs down when the movie was over.

Note: I am referring specifically to people who attend preview screenings, not regular screenings after a film has gone into general release. The audiences at those latter screenings might not be better, necessarily, but previews tend to attract people who have nothing invested in the movie, people who simply thought "Hey, I just won a free movie ticket!" and went to the movie unawares.

Peter, it's rare that I disagree with nearly every point you bring up in a post! :) First, what I'd rather do is beside the point: For a workin' slob like myself, it's either an evening preview screening or no screening at all.

As for the crowds that turn out at evening preview screenings, I find them to be more tolerable and well behaved than the opening-night crowds I sometimes sit with for a movie that opens cold (maybe those movies tend to attract a certain type of audience?). People have complained for years about other audience members who talk during movies, but I rarely encounter that. The big annoyance for me is people lighting up their cell phones to take calls or, more likely, to read texts.

I'm frustrated that I don't have an option to see this film in advance, but certain studios now screen ALL their movies in the afternoons. I figure it's just a matter of time before other studios follow suit. I expect this screening strategy for arthouse movies, but major studio releases?


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Christian wrote:

: Peter, it's rare that I disagree with nearly every point you bring up in a post! :)

Let's cherish this moment. :)

: First, what I'd rather do is beside the point: For a workin' slob like myself, it's either an evening preview screening or no screening at all.

Well, I'm a non-workin' slob -- I'm a stay-at-home parent now -- so I generally have to make do with evening previews too. (One big exception: family films tend to screen on Saturday mornings.)

: As for the crowds that turn out at evening preview screenings, I find them to be more tolerable and well behaved than the opening-night crowds I sometimes sit with for a movie that opens cold (maybe those movies tend to attract a certain type of audience?).

Ah, well, back in the days before I became a stay-at-home parent, I generally went to daytime screenings wherever possible or, if a movie didn't have any preview screenings, I caught a matinee on the opening day. It's only in the last few years that evening screenings have become the norm for me -- but even then, if I'm not going to a preview, I tend to go after 9pm, rather than after 6pm, so that I can be home for the kids' bedtime. And I'm guessing the late shows aren't generally as heavily populated as the early shows. (I did catch the midnight screening of Fast Five last week -- the first time I can recall doing that in ages -- but the theatre wasn't all that full, so it was easy for me to sit far from other people. Indeed, I believe I was the only person sitting in the front section of the theatre that night. I usually am.)

The IDEAL situation, BTW, is when a movie is such a "big deal" that they have a critics-only screening in the evening At The Same Time that they have the preview screening for contest winners etc. The first time I ever attended a critics-only screening in the evening was for The Da Vinci Code, and it's happened a few times since, most recently for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part I; in both cases, there were so many critics in the room that it felt well-populated enough, even without the "real" moviegoers.

: People have complained for years about other audience members who talk during movies, but I rarely encounter that. The big annoyance for me is people lighting up their cell phones to take calls or, more likely, to read texts.

Oh, dear lord, yes. This is one of the reasons I tend to sit so close to the front.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Whoa.

Remember that Malick-focused blog - All Things Shining - that was supposed to be connected to a book project? (It was mentioned earlier in the thread.)

It's gone, leaving its reader to wonder what exactly this is about.

Screen-shot-2011-05-04-at-6.19.38-PM.png

It looks like Paul Maher (the blog creator) decided to fire "All Things Shining" back up on Wordpress. I just found the link on his "Malick Blogs" Facebook page:

ALL THINGS SHINING…The Terrence Malick Blog

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