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Chashab

2006 College Football

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We don't have couches on the porches in the suburbs. In fact, we don't even have porches. We have decks. And ten-foot inflatable Brutus Buckeye lawn ornaments.

Ahh yes. Sometimes it is good to be too snooty even to have a mascot. We're happy merely to sport block M flags. On the house, cars, everything.

Wait, don't you have some guy dancing around dressed in a Wolverine suit?

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Wait, don't you have some guy dancing around dressed in a Wolverine suit?

I don't fit into the slots they call "seats" at The Big House, so I haven't been to a game in years. I've never seen one. It isn't in the promos. If they do, then the Michigan Atheletic Dept. is bribing the networks to keep from showing him.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Ohio State: 20 UM: 14

My rationale: +1 TD from each defenses' opponent's avg. score, converted 1 Ohio State TD into 2 field goals to show respect to UM's front 7.

Have fun in Pasadena, Rich.

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Some of my earliest sports memories involve St. Woody Hayes and the epic battles he staged with Michigan coach Bo Schembechler. Bo died earlier this morning. And a game that I thought could not possibly be hyped beyond its already staggering importance just got even more important.

My condolences go out to all Michigan fans. Nobody in Columbus liked Bo. He was the face of The Enemy. But everybody who is honest will admit that they respected and admired him. He, along with Woody, made the rivalry what it is today. Go Bucks. But R.I.P., Bo.

Edited by Andy Whitman

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I would never make a prediction in this game, even if either were a prohibitive favorite and the other having a mediocre season, or worse. This rivalry precedes Michigan becoming a state. It is apparantly arguable among historians that it was Ohioans who named residents of then Michigan Territory "Wolverines" after the bitter dispute over territory surrounding Toledo. They meant it as an insult.

On October 15, 1932 Michigan returned the favor. This was the first ever performance of the famous "Script Ohio". At The Horseshoe. By the Michigan Band as a gift to their friends to the South. It was Woodrow Wilson ("because I couldn't go for three") Hayes, the Col. Kurtz of college football who made The Game a war.

There is a great pair of articles today in WSJ's "Weekend Journal" on The Game. UM dominated from 1897 through 1919. After that, Michigan only holds a slim five game lead. Further, if aggregate "40 times" are compared (this has only been done since 1999 for all college teams) the quicker team always wins if there is significant separation. Whichever team has an aggregate time of 0.04 or better, it WILL win. Last year OSU's separation was 0.07. If less than 0.04, speed is not a factor in the game. This year, OSU is 0.03 faster. Even in this comparison, the teams are practically even.

Edited by Rich Kennedy

"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Reading an article on how nasty Ohio State fans can be (no implications for present company) and came across this, which relates back to something I'd posted here earlier in the year:

I made it a point to talk to wide receiver Anthony Gonzalez, a philosophy major with a 4.0 GPA who may be the smartest player on the field tomorrow. Feeling the need to change the subject after Gonzalez gently admonished me for having never read any Plato, I asked about his father.

Adding: Rich, just noticing your new sig. Our Nebraska's Tom Osborne was one of those successful, laid back types. In fact, a number of people thought he was downright droll, stoic. But no one can argue his success with the team.

Edited by Chashab

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Great game. Michigan clearly showed that they were the second-best college football team in the country.

Now, in the midst of the suburban idyll, my neighbors are bellowing. The sound of either firecrakers or gunfire can be heard in buttoned-down Westerville, Ohio. "O-H" someone bellows a few houses down. "H-E-N-R-Y" I bellow back. There is no response. I love playin' with the neighbors' heads.

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WWWWWWWWWWOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWWWWW!!!!

What a game! I've changed my mind; after watching Hart slash through our defense, I don't want a rematch!

Funny you should mention that. During halftime of the Wake Forest/Va Tech game, they showed the results of a poll on whether the championship game should be a rematch. Red=Yes, Blue=No. Ohio polled no, while the ENTIRETY of Big Ten states polled yes. Heh heh. It would be nice to see these guys play on a neutral site. At the expense of the mystique of this hallowed game. This was just about the best game I've ever seen. The only thing I would want back would be that "tackle" by Leon Hall in the first half, of Ginn, who ran for a score. That was one of our best tacklers. Oh, yes. Nice shot of the kid. Who's the baby sitter? :D


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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I'm sorry, anything where the champion is determined by a vote or a poll is not a sport. This means you ballroom dancing. This means you gymnastics. This means you ice-skating. And, yes, this means you, college football. You are an entertainment competition.

Playoff. The only sane solution.

And Ken, nobody will beat Ohio State this season. Not USC. Not Florida. Not BSU. Not M@$#%gan. Not Arkansas.

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Playoffs are not going to happen. This will be the last sellout of college football to ersatz professionalism. The NCAA will push for it at some point, but college presidents will oppose it forever. Though the passing of Bo makes one less bullhorn opposing the perpetual sellout of the sport, I don't see the Big Ten going for this anytime soon. It may not happen this way, but I would not be surprised if playoffs were railroaded, the big Ten would walk away, just like the Ivy League did when mandatory 10 game schedules were instituted (only at that point did Notre Dame and Michigan have a chance at battling it out for most wins. Yale's wins dwarf either school). The Big Ten has always had pretensions to being a public Ivy.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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I suspect we'll get stuck with Cal in the Rose Bowl. Being a non Rose Bowl year, they'll probably invite the best Pac 10 team not in the championship game. OTOH, it could happen, UCLA could beat USC and send the Trojies to the Rose Bowl.

I'm with you on the hypocrisy, ken. I can't wait to hear the wailing and gnashing of teeth tomorrow at work about how Michigan will face a nobody in the Rose Bowl, life is over. Or worse, "It's up to UCLA! They gotta do it. We BELONG at #2. Pleeeeez!!"


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Anyone else here think the UM-OSU game wasn't THAT close? It was certainly a great game. But it always seemed like it would take something pretty big for Michigan to even the score, much less pull out a win.

Which brings up an interesting point I read in some column: compare USC's and UM's non-conference schedules.

USC: Arkansas, Nebraska, Notre Dame (all currently ranked)

Michigan: Vandy, Central Michigan, Ball State (none currently ranked, near loss to BSU)

Sure, USC lost to (the now BCS-ranked) Oregon State, while Michigan lost to the number one team in the nation. This is significant. But look at those non-conference wins, especially Ball State. Also, in conference play, you have USC solidly beating Cal (good), Arizona (decent), and Oregon (decent). Michigan beat Wisconsin (good?) and Penn State (decent). The Big Ten is a great conference, but I'm not terribly impressed with UM's conference wins relative to USC's.

It's funny to find myself rooting for an OSU-USC title game, because I don't particularly like USC. In Jeff's perfect world we'd see Arkansas-OSU, or even Boise State-OSU, just for the heck of it. Even if Michigan was the 2nd best team in the country, I'd rather not see a rematch for the title game.


So you ladies and you gentlemen, pull your bloomers on...

-Joe Henry

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OK I'll bite.

Which brings up an interesting point I read in some column: compare USC's and UM's non-conference schedules.

USC: Arkansas, Nebraska, Notre Dame (all currently ranked)

Michigan: Vandy, Central Michigan, Ball State (none currently ranked, near loss to BSU)

Let's not forget Michigan's pasting of Notre Dame AT Notre Dame. I believe that the margin was greater. Away, not at home like USC. UM exposed Penn State AT Penn State AT night (away night games are considered uniquely tough). Happy Valley is quintessentially inhospitable.

Sure, USC lost to (the now BCS-ranked) Oregon State, while Michigan lost to the number one team in the nation. This is significant. But look at those non-conference wins, especially Ball State. Also, in conference play, you have USC solidly beating Cal (good), Arizona (decent), and Oregon (decent). Michigan beat Wisconsin (good?) and Penn State (decent). The Big Ten is a great conference, but I'm not terribly impressed with UM's conference wins relative to USC's.

Michigan is the biggest game of the year for Minnesota (college football's oldest "trophy" at stake), Wisconsin, Michigan State, OSU, often Penn State, and arguably Notre Dame (one of the oldest, if on and off again rivalries. Michigan taught Notre Dame men the game in the 1880's (?)). Throughout the season it was acknowledged that Michigan had the toughest schedule of any team now in the BCS standings. I believe that computer rankings have had it the fourth toughest schedule this year in Division I. All of Michigan's toughest Big Ten games were away this year, Minnesota, Iowa, Penn State, OSU. They played usually light weight Indiana when Indiana was peaking at Bloomington.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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OK I'll bite.

Throughout the season it was acknowledged that Michigan had the toughest schedule of any team now in the BCS standings. I believe that computer rankings have had it the fourth toughest schedule this year in Division I. All of Michigan's toughest Big Ten games were away this year, Minnesota, Iowa, Penn State, OSU. They played usually light weight Indiana when Indiana was peaking at Bloomington.

Fourth toughest schedule in Division I?? Well, the computers certainly can't be wrong, but I'm astonished. I guess I really do underrate the Big Ten. Or is it just the number of away games at the conference's tougher schools?

Anyway, I'm still rooting for Boise State vs Ohio State. Honestly, what would that look like? Could they beat OSU? Eh, not really. What about someone like Florida or Cal? I'd love to see a non-BCS team win a BCS bowl game. Not that it's likely to happen...


So you ladies and you gentlemen, pull your bloomers on...

-Joe Henry

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Anyway, I'm still rooting for Boise State vs Ohio State. Honestly, what would that look like?

70 - 14, OSU? That would be my prediction. I figure Ian Johnson's good for a couple touchdowns for BSU. The BSU defense against that OSU offensive juggernaut could get very ugly very quickly, though.

Here in the epicenter of all things Buckeye, the natives have settled down for the long seven-week siege between The Biggest Game In Sports History and the Anti-Climactic National Championship Game In Which OSU Trouches Whoever They Play.

The OSU basketball team, by the way? Currently #1 in the nation (until they lose tomorrow night to North Carolina). I don't think anyone in Columbus has noticed.

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Anyway, I'm still rooting for Boise State vs Ohio State. Honestly, what would that look like?

70 - 14, OSU? That would be my prediction. I figure Ian Johnson's good for a couple touchdowns for BSU. The BSU defense against that OSU offensive juggernaut could get very ugly very quickly, though.

Wow, worse that the '95 Husker's schellacking of Florida in the national championship game, 62-24, which is so far the largest margin of victory and highest score in a championship game.

Here in the epicenter of all things Buckeye, the natives have settled down for the long seven-week siege between The Biggest Game In Sports History and the Anti-Climactic National Championship Game In Which OSU Trouches Whoever They Play.

Blast-it-ball, basket-what?

I'm pretty much a spectator of only one sport: college football. Frankly, I don't have time to follow or spectate any others, and I also find college football a whole lot of fun to watch.

But last I checked, the Husker volleyball team was first in the nation. Their dominance is kind of stunning: they have one 10 of the 11 Big 12 titles, and two national titles in the last 11 years.

Edited by Chashab

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Blast-it-ball, basket-what?

I'm pretty much a spectator of only one sport: college football. Frankly, I don't have time to follow or spectate any others, and I also find college football a whole lot of fun to watch.

Actually one of the reasons I'm glad college football doesn't have a playoff system is that it makes the regular season all the more imporant. Literally, every game matters. As far as college basketball goes, I really don't start paying attention until tourny time. Sure the early season games matter to some extent, but not like they do in college football.


"It is scandalous for Christians to have an imagination starved for God." - Mark Filiatreau

I write occasionally at Unfamiliar Stars.

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Actually one of the reasons I'm glad college football doesn't have a playoff system is that it makes the regular season all the more imporant. Literally, every game matters. As far as college basketball goes, I really don't start paying attention until tourny time. Sure the early season games matter to some extent, but not like they do in college football.

Agreed, I'd hate them to do anything that diminished the importance of the regular season. But you wouldn't have to have a 65 team tournament where half the teams in the BCS conferences make it - you could easily do a 4 team tournament that would pretty much guarantee that any team that didn't win all their games except 1 wouldn't get in, so you'd still pretty much have to be a dominant team to make it.

Think about this year - a 4 team tournament with OSU, Mich, USC, and Florida. Would make for a heck of a two-week stretch, wouldn't it?


"You guys don't really know who you're dealing with."

"Oh yeah, and who exactly are we dealing with?"

"I'm the mother flippin' rhymenoceros."

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I believe that computer rankings have had it the fourth toughest schedule this year in Division I.

That sounds like the kind of uncredited statistic that gets repeated a lot on Ann Arbor-area sports talk radio. ;)

I can't seem to find any "official " strength of schedule poll, but the unofficial ones all put the Michigan schedule well behind several other BCS teams' (not to mention the schedules or seven or eight SEC teams). Mike Greenfield has Michigan at 51; the GBE puts them at 25.

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Actually one of the reasons I'm glad college football doesn't have a playoff system is that it makes the regular season all the more imporant. Literally, every game matters. As far as college basketball goes, I really don't start paying attention until tourny time. Sure the early season games matter to some extent, but not like they do in college football.

Agreed, I'd hate them to do anything that diminished the importance of the regular season. But you wouldn't have to have a 65 team tournament where half the teams in the BCS conferences make it - you could easily do a 4 team tournament that would pretty much guarantee that any team that didn't win all their games except 1 wouldn't get in, so you'd still pretty much have to be a dominant team to make it.

Think about this year - a 4 team tournament with OSU, Mich, USC, and Florida. Would make for a heck of a two-week stretch, wouldn't it?

A four team tourny would be pretty good, but even then we're opening up a whole new can of worms. How do you pick the four teams? This year it is pretty easy, but next year it might not. Even this year it isn't easy. Louisville and Bosie St. would like to be included in a four-team tourny discussion. A bubble team in football would have more chance of winning it all than a bubble team in college.

But of course, having a four-team tourny in football would still enable the whining to continue, something I actually enjoy.


"It is scandalous for Christians to have an imagination starved for God." - Mark Filiatreau

I write occasionally at Unfamiliar Stars.

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Well, the problem of a tourney has always been the extra games for the team itself. Consider my dear Wolverines. If they lost the first game, they would finish with 13 games. If they won it all, 15. And this does not include any post season bowls. We are veering towards pro-level length of schedule. When do these guys get to study (stop laughing, at least the linemen consistently get good grades)? I remember the elevation of the schedule to a mandatory 10. Seems only that shcool presidents care about this anymore because it is the one argument against not highlighted in the national debate.

Darren and Jeff: Sports Illustrated and Sporting News both mentioned strength of schedule in pre season summaries. You are probably looking at after the fact. The strength numbers I saw were one of the reasons (along with Carr himself) that Michigan started the season so low in the rankings. The difference didn't occur to me 'til now.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Now, I'm just having a little bit of speculating fun. I think of the teams that are left in the top ten that have a chance to lose two, USC is definitely one. ND is another, and Louisville still another. My knowledge of the SEC and ACC is woefully ignorant, but I certainly don't think they're as tough as they make out.

Well, how about that. I should have put money where my mouth was.

I gotta say, I think we're in for scUM vs. the Bucks in January. I really don't want to see that. Thanks Pete Carroll.

I don't have any respect for Florida, and think it would be a blowout if they played Ohio State. At least a rematch will be a good game.

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Fla just recoverd a bonehead fumble in the endzone. We'll see. My cynicism knows no end of paranoia in the enterprize of avoiding a rematch.

BTW, to all who wish for playoffs, I think that the NCAA has sent a subliminal message concerning its own view. Did anyone see the Appalachian St./Montana ST. game today? It was billed officially by the NCAA as the Quarterfinal match for the Division 1 Championship. Interesting, eh? Happy Appy won BTW. They are rankend #1 in the Division 1 Championship Tournament.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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