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Jason Panella

Coffee

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My mom was talking about this just the other day; it's not the only report that's come out in the past few years about the benefits of coffee. Veeeeerry interesting. I should find the article when I get a chance, but she claims they're now saying two to three cups a day is better for you than even just one.

And a good cup of coffee does relieve stress, even if it's not "calming." At least, I've always found this to be true.

Thanks for sharing, Thoreau! I can't listen here (on a break at work) but I'm definitely going to be listening later.

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My employer upgraded to the Flavia System. That's right: Flavia was an upgrade. What preceded it must have been a version of that truly horrible office coffee that every place had back in the 1980s and 90s. I count my blessings.

You've obviously have never worked in a grocery store. I don't know what it is, but no matter what grounds are used, my store's "house" coffee is amazing in its lack of flavor and acid overloaded aftertaste, if that makes any sense. I've brought a thermos of my own for years now. I'm hoping that with our remodel, we get a starbucks counter (many high volume Krogers have them here), employees get a discount.

My mom was talking about this just the other day; it's not the only report that's come out in the past few years about the benefits of coffee. Veeeeerry interesting. I should find the article when I get a chance, but she claims they're now saying two to three cups a day is better for you than even just one.

Great lady, your Mom. I'd say that's about right, depending on cup size. Three 12 to 14 oz mugs a day is about perfect for me.

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Three to four cups a day is my average, when I have half-n-half around. I didn't last week and ended up feeling lethargic most of the week because of it. I can function still, so I don't think I consider myself "dependent," but I definitely feel better and write more and get more things done with a cup of coffee at hand.

My mom has started buying espresso and running it through a drip coffee maker. I'm still fond of the fresh-ground regular roast stuff, but does anyone else do this?

I realize that reference my mom like this makes me sound like I'm twelve. Perhaps I should stop...

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Today our huge order of "kups" from OneKup.com came. And...I'm very disappointed. While I'm astonished at--and very much looking forward to sampling--the immensely diverse range of coffees, a good number of those we ordered were past their expiration dates--yuck. Most of the others were obviously quite fresh, and they threw in some hot cocoas and teas, even though I hadn't ordered any.

Just judging from their site, Alan, OneKup probably doesn't have the fastest turnaround with shipping

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My mom has started buying espresso and running it through a drip coffee maker. I'm still fond of the fresh-ground regular roast stuff, but does anyone else do this?

Oh yeah. Plenty of times. I like the result, as I like a strong flavor.

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On the flip side, you can run any sort of roast through an espresso machine's portafilter

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I'm glad you brought that up, Jason. In the 1990s, I discovered "Espresso Roast" coffee -- Starbucks brand, I believe -- at the grocery store. I LOVED it. But I'd never had an espresso. I thought it was a type of dark-roasted bean.

That's what "espresso roast" means, right -- dark, robust, etc.? I'm not sure how it differs from, say, "Italian," which I also liked but haven't seen in years.

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There ain't no beans involved. This is all nitrogen-packed grounds.

The shelf life of ground coffee

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The shelf life of ground coffee

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I like McDonalds coffee. seriously.

I think they put meat in it or something.

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coffee snob

You rang? :lol:

Something I decided this morning that I might try more often: brew different origin / estate coffees for different parts of the day. For instance, I've been making a Mexican single origin in the morning before I go to work, but it's really more of a 'dessert' coffee

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I like McDonalds coffee. seriously.

I think they put meat in it or something.

Probably, yes. :) But it's actually not completely horrible. Not as bad as it used to be anyway. Good enough that I've heard actual people in heated McDonalds vs. Starbucks debates. My actual preference is a little place near my apartment called the Blue Moose. But that's because I can get imported, often organic, fresh-ground and fresh-brewed coffee.

QUOTE (Jason Panella @ Jul 3 2008, 11:19 AM) *

The shelf life of ground coffee — even nitrogen-packed — is technically less than a day. After that, it gets...weird. Which is why all of the pre-ground stuff that's been sitting in the grocery store tastes like sludge.

coffee snob

It is sludge! I was raised in a house where Maxwell and Folgers were equated with "drinks of the devil," so my entire family has a brand of coffee snobbery that I think is in our blood. Running through our veins alongside the espresso and words of Undset, no doubt.

I am becoming a snob snob. I am a discriminating consumer and beneficiary of the various forms of snobbishness in these forums.

Is there not yet a thread on snobbery? And I can't tell if you're comparing them to wine or coffee, but I'm rather disturbed that I now have taste comparisons for each.

Rich Kennedy, apparently, you're a higher-class of House Blend.

Edited by livingeleven

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Rich Kennedy, apparently, you're a higher-class of House Blend.

You can't call him that

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(And here's a little terminology lesson
Edited by Rich Kennedy

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At the risk of destroying the compliment, I confess to being ignorant of this single origin thing. I must say, I admire your connoiseurship of coffee. Continue to inform us as you see fit.

Single origin coffees are beans picked from the same farm or estate. Blends are simply a mixture of more than two types of beans.

There are there main 'types' of coffee, based on regions: the Americans (includes Central America, South America, etc.), Africans (self-explanatory) and Asians (mainly southeast Asia). All have stereotypical taste profiles, though there are plenty of anomalies or deviations. Many African coffees, for instance, have an earthy taste, and many Americans are known for a sharp, almost tangy bite. (Known as acidity, in a good way

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You're right. :) Sorry, Rich.

Single-origins tend to be my favorite, and that reminds me:

Has anyone else tried Starbuck's new Pike Place Roast? Or is that just in my area? I resigned myself to Starbucks the other day (both price and I thought, their House Blend-- I like some House Blends, but theirs isn't one of them), and opted for Pike Place Roast. To my surprise, it was actually really good. I liked it, anyway.

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Has anyone else tried Starbuck's new Pike Place Roast? Or is that just in my area? I resigned myself to Starbucks the other day (both price and I thought, their House Blend-- I like some House Blends, but theirs isn't one of them), and opted for Pike Place Roast. To my surprise, it was actually really good. I liked it, anyway.

I haven't, but I heard from a few people that it's pretty good. I really don't like Starbucks' roasting philosophy, so I avoid their coffee as much as possible. But a few like-minded folks mentioned how Pike Place is a little different. I'm willing to give it a shot.

And someone mentioned roasting levels before. Wikipedia has a fair article on it here.

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It's worth a try-- I used to work for a Starbucks, and generally dislike their coffee. There's a bitter, acidic taste that most of their in-store brews have that's partly from roasting, partly from the pre-ground packaging. But Pike Place is worth a try. It's not the strongest brew ever, but the taste is a lot smoother, less metallic, and without the weird aftertaste.

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It's worth a try-- I used to work for a Starbucks, and generally dislike their coffee. There's a bitter, acidic taste that most of their in-store brews have that's partly from roasting, partly from the pre-ground packaging. But Pike Place is worth a try. It's not the strongest brew ever, but the taste is a lot smoother, less metallic, and without the weird aftertaste.

But 'acidic' is a good thing! :) Bitter is not, though.

Maybe they're learning something?

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I think I meant a kind of acidic that isn't good. :) More along the lines of a bitter, metallic taste. Maybe it's vaguely chemical, actually. Hmm.

Also, does anyone know a company that sells good Ethiopian Yirgacheffe online? Ever since a particular coffee shop in the area closed, I can't find any-- not even at the specialty stores in the area.

Edited by livingeleven

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A few places that I can think of:

-La Prima is a great Pittsburgh-based roaster, and they're gaining a good nation-wide reputation. My friend Phil roasts for them. They have some fair trade Yirgacheffe for sale here.

-Beaver Falls Coffee & Tea Company, a place dear to my heart (since I helped start it and was its manager for almost a year), has started roasting recently, and they're doing a dang fine job. I can provide you with contact info if you want it, but I believe Russ (co-owner / close friend) has some green Yirgacheffe that he needs to roast. This is about as local as you can get, and he WILL ship it for you.

And of course, there's Intelligentsia. They don't currently have any Yirgacheffe in stock, but their Tanzanian coffee is fairly close taste profile-wise (and is to die for). They have a reputation as the best roasters in the United States, and have earned it.

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OooooKAAAy. This place never ceases to amaze me. Alan mentioned humility. Well, in just about anything that I've considered myself to be well informed on in my time has been shown up by the fascinations and knowledge of folks here at A&F. Maybe I am not a snob with coffee at all. Compared with my friends and acquaintances here in Detroit, I am. I've always considered myself a gourmet AND a gourmand with respect to food. Amongst you guys, I suppose that I am maybe at best a sophisticated gourmand with respect to coffee. I know what I like and I'm not sure that I have the scratch to explore the outer reaches of my taste in coffee. I'm already in overmy head on a number of other things in that regard. I think I'll sit back and read you guys for a while. Your experience in coffee is beyond me.

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what rich said. 1000 times over. coffee snobs.

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Rich, you're probably better informed on coffee than most folks, so don't sell yourself short. I happened to be thrust head-first into the coffee world a few years ago and

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Thanks for the links, Jason! Yeah. Tanzanian interests me, too, especially if it's Peaberry.

And hey, yeah. Most of what I know I only know because I've worked in a couple different coffee shops. And there are a few places around here that sell really good cups of coffee for about $1.50 or less, for a medium-sized cup. One of the things that's always, always made me upset about Starbucks is the amount they're basically charging for the brand.

Yay! Good coffee!

Rich, as long as you drink it and care about what you're drinking, you're enough of a coffee snob to qualify in my book. There are some people still alive that don't even drink coffee. Seriously.

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