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Filmsweep Reaction to The Mirror.

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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Last night, I watched “Ivan’s Childhood,” which is my first Tarkovsky film. I started with this one because a few followers on Twitter recommended I go through them chronologically.

Anyway, I’m not sure where “Ivan’s Childhood” ranks among Tarkovsky’s other works, but I was amazed by it. The black-and-white images were beautiful, stunning, and often felt otherworldly. In particular, the last few seconds of the movie really left an impression on me. I hesitate to describe them here, since I don’t want to spoil anything for anyone, but “Ivan’s Childhood” has one of the most organically poetic endings of any movie I’ve ever seen. What I mean by that is, it never felt like Tarkovsky was going out of his way to reach for some grand meaning—it’s just all right there.

I look forward to exploring more of Tarkovsky’s work going forward, especially his more well-known works, like Solaris, Andrei Rublev, etc. I'm sure it just gets better from here.

Also, is everyone aware of this book, which will be coming out in February?

http://www.amazon.co...&pf_rd_i=507846

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Last night, I watched “Ivan’s Childhood,” which is my first Tarkovsky film. I started with this one because a few followers on Twitter recommended I go through them chronologically.

Anyway, I’m not sure where “Ivan’s Childhood” ranks among Tarkovsky’s other works, but I was amazed by it. The black-and-white images were beautiful, stunning, and often felt otherworldly. In particular, the last few seconds of the movie really left an impression on me. I hesitate to describe them here, since I don’t want to spoil anything for anyone, but “Ivan’s Childhood” has one of the most organically poetic endings of any movie I’ve ever seen. What I mean by that is, it never felt like Tarkovsky was going out of his way to reach for some grand meaning—it’s just all right there.

I look forward to exploring more of Tarkovsky’s work going forward, especially his more well-known works, like Solaris, Andrei Rublev, etc. I'm sure it just gets better from here.

Also, is everyone aware of this book, which will be coming out in February?

http://www.amazon.co...&pf_rd_i=507846

Ivan's Childhood is easily Tarkovsky's most accessible film (it has the most traditional plot structure and the fewest poetic flourishes and digressions), so while they do get better, they also become more challenging, especially The Mirror.

My brother has read some of Geoff Dyer's other books, and says they're really interesting. I'm looking forward to this one.

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Last night, I watched “Ivan’s Childhood,” which is my first Tarkovsky film. I started with this one because a few followers on Twitter recommended I go through them chronologically.

Anyway, I’m not sure where “Ivan’s Childhood” ranks among Tarkovsky’s other works, but I was amazed by it. The black-and-white images were beautiful, stunning, and often felt otherworldly. In particular, the last few seconds of the movie really left an impression on me. I hesitate to describe them here, since I don’t want to spoil anything for anyone, but “Ivan’s Childhood” has one of the most organically poetic endings of any movie I’ve ever seen. What I mean by that is, it never felt like Tarkovsky was going out of his way to reach for some grand meaning—it’s just all right there.

I look forward to exploring more of Tarkovsky’s work going forward, especially his more well-known works, like Solaris, Andrei Rublev, etc. I'm sure it just gets better from here.

Also, is everyone aware of this book, which will be coming out in February?

http://www.amazon.co...&pf_rd_i=507846

Ivan's Childhood is easily Tarkovsky's most accessible film (it has the most traditional plot structure and the fewest poetic flourishes and digressions), so while they do get better, they also become more challenging, especially The Mirror.

My brother has read some of Geoff Dyer's other books, and says they're really interesting. I'm looking forward to this one.

Yeah. Ivan's Childhood is his film with the most traditional plot structure, except maybe for its ending. It's also quite an achievement for being his first feature film. There are certainly signs in the film of where he was heading in style, into what he was to become as a filmmaker. It shows Tarkovsky's ability to make seemingly ordinary life things (like walking through trees) look extraordinary, or maybe more to the point, his ability to help us to see how extraordinary, wonderful, and sacred, ordinary life really is.

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Wow, speaking of synchronicity or something, I just watched STALKER last night for the first time. Re-reading the old thread here and thinking, wow, now I finally "get" people who I, in my naïve younger years, was less inclined to listen to.

Loved it BTW, and looking forward to a re-watch sometime.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Last night, I watched “Ivan’s Childhood,” which is my first Tarkovsky film ... I look forward to exploring more of Tarkovsky’s work going forward, especially his more well-known works, like Solaris, Andrei Rublev, etc. I'm sure it just gets better from here.

Yes, it does.

Also, is everyone aware of this book, which will be coming out in February?

http://www.amazon.co...&pf_rd_i=507846

I wasn't, but now it's written on my calendar.

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Last week it was Ivan’s Childhood. This past weekend it was Andrei Rublev, and I’m genuinely stunned. I can’t even describe how it made me feel, or what it (for lack of a better word) means--I just know it’s sublime, both aesthetically and spiritually. In particular, I keep thinking about the conclusion of the bell sequence, with Rublev embracing Boriska in the mud and finally breaking his vow of silence…just, wow. All during that section, I’d kept thinking, “Okay…but what does this have to do with anything?” But of course it all makes sense right there in that moment. Honestly, I was this close to tearing up.

Aside from that moment, all that I can articulate right now is that there’s something about Tarkovsky’s aesthetic that creates a very uneasy sense of reality. I get the feeling that he doesn’t want us to be “spectators” or “viewers” as much as witnesses to something. I wish I could describe what I mean better than that, but for now that will have to do.

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Last week it was Ivan’s Childhood. This past weekend it was Andrei Rublev, and I’m genuinely stunned. I can’t even describe how it made me feel, or what it (for lack of a better word) means--I just know it’s sublime, both aesthetically and spiritually. In particular, I keep thinking about the conclusion of the bell sequence, with Rublev embracing Boriska in the mud and finally breaking his vow of silence…just, wow. All during that section, I’d kept thinking, “Okay…but what does this have to do with anything?” But of course it all makes sense right there in that moment. Honestly, I was this close to tearing up.

Aside from that moment, all that I can articulate right now is that there’s something about Tarkovsky’s aesthetic that creates a very uneasy sense of reality. I get the feeling that he doesn’t want us to be “spectators” or “viewers” as much as witnesses to something. I wish I could describe what I mean better than that, but for now that will have to do.

Andrew. If your on a Tarkovsky run you might want to pick up on his book Sculpting in time, it's a fantastic read, with great insights into cinema, showing his deeply poetic, insightful heart, and some of his views on faith.

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I'd like to put together a Tarkovsky blog-a-thon for early to mid June and wanted to see if anyone here on the A&F forum would be interested in contributing something. I'd like to get a good mix of people involved, given how much there is to say about the man himself and his movies. So far, I've done two Tarkovsky-related posts on my blog (here and here), and want to do at least three more before the year's over. If this blog-a-thon moves forward, then I'll probably do two of those three at that time.

Anyway, if you're interested you can respond on here, or you can email me at andrewbwelch@gmail.com, or you can DM me on Twitter (@andrew_b_welch). If you don't have a blog yourself, I'd be happy to have you as a guest blogger. Also, this invitation is open to Tarkovsky fans as well as Tarkovsky detractors. I'd like to keep the blog-a-thon largely positive, but I also want it to be a conversation, so a multitude of voices are welcome. If you've read my second post, then you know I've already voiced one of my own frustrations with Tarkovsky.

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I'd like to put together a Tarkovsky blog-a-thon for early to mid June and wanted to see if anyone here on the A&F forum would be interested in contributing something. I'd like to get a good mix of people involved, given how much there is to say about the man himself and his movies. So far, I've done two Tarkovsky-related posts on my blog (here and here), and want to do at least three more before the year's over. If this blog-a-thon moves forward, then I'll probably do two of those three at that time.

Anyway, if you're interested you can respond on here, or you can email me at andrewbwelch@gmail.com, or you can DM me on Twitter (@andrew_b_welch). If you don't have a blog yourself, I'd be happy to have you as a guest blogger. Also, this invitation is open to Tarkovsky fans as well as Tarkovsky detractors. I'd like to keep the blog-a-thon largely positive, but I also want it to be a conversation, so a multitude of voices are welcome. If you've read my second post, then you know I've already voiced one of my own frustrations with Tarkovsky.

I'd love to participate. Let me know.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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I'd love to participate. Let me know.

+1, with gusto!

I plan to launch an arts blog mid-May, or I can write something up for you to post... I'm game for anything if you'd like me. Tarkovsky is one of my very favorite artists!

Are you looking for anything specific? Would you be looking for film-specific entries, or general posts on his entire body of work, or both - or neither? - or all of the above???

Κύριε Ἰησοῦ Χριστέ, Υἱὲ τοῦ Θεοῦ, ἐλέησόν με τὸν ἁμαρτωλόν.

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Count me in. I had the pleasure of seeing Andrei for the first time in January on a battered 35mm print, and have struggled to put into words just what that one particular screening meant to me at this point in my life. Once the dust has settled from this semester, I'd like to take a crack at it.

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In principle, I'd love to. Realistically, I'm stretched almost past the breaking point most of the time, and I can't commit to one more thing. But if I can chime in and contribute something, I will. Cheers.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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but I don't know what a blog-a-thon is.

I'm pretty sure Jerry Lewis won't be involved, if that's what you're worried about.

Thanks for all the interest, guys! Looks like plenty of people are onboard.

A blog-a-thon, if you've never heard the term (and I hadn't until late last year) is just a series of blogs all based around a particular subject, so in this case Tarkovsky. I'll go into more detail when I email everyone (because a few people who may be interested aren't on A&F), but the basic idea is that you'd write one post on whatever tickles your fancy. Maybe you're interested in the way he uses sound, or the way that almost all his movies have some combination of color and black-and-white, or (since this is the Arts & Faith forum) how his faith impacted his visual/narrative style, etc. Or perhaps you have a more personal angle you want to write about, that works too. You can write more than one post if you want, but I think for the most part one will be enough.

So, all that said, I'd like to get the official email out soon. That will make it easier to coordinate, I think. If you don't have your email listed in your profile, I'd appreciate it if you contacted me at andrewbwelch@gmail.com or sent me a personal message on here.

And to Steve and Jeff: No worries, I completely understand. If June rolls around and it looks like you might be able to squeeze something in, we'd love to have you along.

Also, I guess I should link to this and end with a, "Happy birthday, T!" http://mubi.com/note...ts/tarkovsky-80

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Fwiw, I was contacted recently by a guy who was doing a research project on blogging, and he informed me that I was officially the coiner of the term blog-a-thon. I'm not sure if I believe him, but I'm pretty sure the term was first widely used in January 2006, when a bunch of us film bloggers discussed Showgirls. The event was first described as a "blog orgy," which I then turned into "Showgirls-a-thon." By the time we did a second one a month later about Code Unknown, we were all calling it a blog-a-thon.

Also, as I was rewatching Tree of Life last night, I got an urge to pull out Mirror, which I haven't seen for a couple years. I'll try to put something together for a Tarkovsky blog-a-thon.

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Also, as I was rewatching Tree of Life last night, I got an urge to pull out Mirror, which I haven't seen for a couple years. I'll try to put something together for a Tarkovsky blog-a-thon.

Yes, I think MIRROR is a key film in understanding the "memory image" that Malick is conjuring in THE TREE OF LIFE. I'd love to read what you have to say about it.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Anders, while rewatching Tree of Life, I kept thinking, "There is absolutely no logic to this editing. The entire form of this film is a second-to-second expression of Malick's unique and idiosyncratic taste." I think that's true of him, Tarkovsky, and very few other filmmakers. I'd put Apitchatpong in that camp. And Claire Denis, at times. Godard, probably. Not many others.

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