Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
opus

Battlestar Galactica

Recommended Posts

You have to begin with the miniseries. It's not optional. It's essential to the storyline. You'll find some people critiquing the miniseries as not being as good as what followed but you have to start there!

Razor is a standalone but it's worth seeing. I forget exactly where it fits in (somewhere around seasons 2 and 3).

moi aussi. even more, i'm confused about what sets i need to pick up. i just picked up season one (5 DVDs) and three (6 DVDs) but have no idea what else i need. obviously there's season 2.0 and 2.5. and season four. also razor? and the miniseries? can anyone clarify the timeline (and yes, i'm a bit of a completist - i suppose i'll also pick up the original movie)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the mini-series is included with the Season 1 DVD set, and Razor is included with the Season 4.0 DVD set. I don't know if all the bonus features got carried over, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you're right! yee-hah!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure the webisodes are included in the DVD sets too: The Resistance ones are on season 3 (and are really worth watching, as they set the tone for the beginning of the third season quite well) and The Face of the Enemy ones are on season 4.0...I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i'll check. so far the mini-series and first 2 episodes are great. as i may have stated previously, i only caught parts of a few shows during its run and so am pretty much a blank slate (we had no television, let alone cable, for the past few years). i

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even after finishing the series, "33" remains my favorite episode of the whole run. Those 50 minutes are pure dynamite. There are some excellent episodes throughout, but for me, none of them quite reach that level. The only other TV episode that to me approaches it is "Objects in Space" from Firefly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

does anyone know anything (or anywhen) about "the plan"? evidently it's the event(s) of mini-series from the cylons' view...(or something like that)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I've read, The Plan will look at many of the BSG events from the Cylons' point of view. I think it'll pick up just moments after the Twelve Colonies are destroyed and go from there. The Wikipedia page on the movie has some interesting spoilerish nuggets there, and Edward James Olmos (who is directing the movie) said something like, "BSG fans will want to watch the series again after seeing this so they can piece things together."

Sounds fascinating!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can it really be said that the Cylons had "A Plan", though? I mean, the producers certainly didn't, when they started the show. And while I have yet to see Season 4.5, everything I have read about it indicates that the absence of a plan really started to show. (Of course, the producers DID have a "plan", i.e. a story arc with a back-story and so forth, by the time they FINISHED the series. But much of that back-story didn't exist AT ALL until sometime during Season 3.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can it really be said that the Cylons had "A Plan", though?

Well, they can be said to have had a plan retroactively, maybe? I haven't seen the movie, since it won't be out for months, so I can't critique on where the title fits in or how.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just ordered the season 2 set -- really enjoying the series. love how they're moving the characters along -- baltar, adama, apollo, the pres and starbuck (man, does she clean up nice!)...a couple of the episodes didn't measure up for me, but it's pretty consistently at a very high level. i'm hooked. and i know i will be watching the series again. and probably again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Definitely *not* something I'd classify as a "space opera"! ;)

And yet in a way it also manages to be space opera.

If you think of space opera as demanding huge, apocalyptic stakes, hard science plus heavy doses of mysticism, over-sized characters -- BSG has all that, even it roots those things in the grittiness of actual human characters (and cylons are humans, too, of course).

By the time you finish the whole sequence, I think you'll agree that BSG is "a gritty space opera."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I'd call the Star Trek of Kirk, Spock, etc. "space opera".

"Space opera", to me, implies, well, a soap opera set in space. But there was almost never any sort of connecting thread between the episodes of the original Star Trek series; there was no larger "story" that the episodes fit into. (The movies, on the other hand...) That had all changed by Deep Space Nine, though.

The revamped Battlestar Galactica is certainly "space opera", and much more so in the later seasons than the original seasons, I would argue; the focus increasingly turns away from holding a mirror up to the current geopolitical situation and towards the starting and stopping of romantic relationships, the melodrama of friendships and betrayals, the creation of a major mythological back-story that didn't even exist when they wrote the first two seasons, etc., etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Space opera", to me, implies, well, a soap opera set in space. But there was almost never any sort of connecting thread between the episodes of the original Star Trek series; there was no larger "story" that the episodes fit into. (The movies, on the other hand...) That had all changed by Deep Space Nine, though.

And to me, the term "space opera" deals with the scope of the title: how grandiose and detailed it is. FWIW, here's the Wikipedia definition (emphasis mine):

Space opera is a subgenre of speculative fiction or science fiction that emphasizes romantic, often melodramatic adventure, set mainly or entirely in space, generally involving conflict between opponents possessing powerful (and sometimes quite fanciful) technologies and abilities. Perhaps the most significant trait of space opera is that settings, characters, battles, powers, and themes tend to be very large-scale.

From that perspective, I don't know if I'd personally consider Battlestar Galactica to be a "space opera" because it feels, well, too small in scale. However, something like Star Wars feels like "space opera" to me because it takes place in a very large, detailed world (especially once you step outside of the movies into other areas of the canon).

Then again, who knows how much the BSG world will develop and enlarge with The Plan, Caprica, and any other continuations of the franchise.

(Of course, the Wikipedia page I linked to above includes Battlestar Galactica as an example of space opera in film/television...)

Edited by opus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

opus wrote:

: From that perspective, I don't know if I'd personally consider Battlestar Galactica to be a "space opera" because it feels, well, too small in scale.

On the contrary, I'd say it's pretty big-scale: visits to multiple planetary systems, an entire species almost wiped out by genocide, an elaborate mythology (most of which was invented while they were writing the third season) that goes back several millennia, etc., etc.

: However, something like Star Wars feels like "space opera" to me because it takes place in a very large, detailed world . . .

A world that, for all dramatic intents and purposes, gets smaller and smaller with every movie. (Hey, he's my father! Hey, she's my sister! Hey, my android slave was built by my father which kind of makes him my brother! Hey, Boba Fett and all those stormtroopers are all clones of The Same Guy! Etc., etc.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A world that, for all dramatic intents and purposes, gets smaller and smaller with every movie. (Hey, he's my father! Hey, she's my sister! Hey, my android slave was built by my father which kind of makes him my brother! Hey, Boba Fett and all those stormtroopers are all clones of The Same Guy! Etc., etc.)

That's in the movies. But, as I said, if you move into other areas of the canon -- novels, comic books, video games -- it's pretty massive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

opus wrote:

: But, as I said, if you move into other areas of the canon -- novels, comic books, video games -- it's pretty massive.

Those things aren't really "canon", though. They're "apocrypha".

Maybe I'm applying Star Trek terminology to the Star Wars franchise. But given how pretty much all of the Star Wars movies have felt pretty free to ignore the existing novels, comics and video games, I think it's safe to say that all those stories are basically non-canonical.

Or maybe they're canonical until a movie clearly says otherwise? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe I'm applying Star Trek terminology to the Star Wars franchise. But given how pretty much all of the Star Wars movies have felt pretty free to ignore the existing novels, comics and video games, I think it's safe to say that all those stories are basically non-canonical.

Or maybe they're canonical until a movie clearly says otherwise? :)

FWIW, Star Wars does have its own "franchise continuity cop":

To Star Wars fans, [Leland] Chee is the Keeper of the Holocron, arguably the leading expert on everything that happened a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. His official title is continuity database administrator for the Lucas Licensing arm of Lucasfilm—which means Chee keeps meticulous track of not just the six live-action movies but also cartoons, TV specials, scores of videogames and reference books, and hundreds of novels and comics.

Of course, Chee's Holocron isn't a Force-sensitive crystal. It's a FileMaker database, a searchable repository of more than 30,000 entries covering almost every character, planet, and weapon mentioned, however fleetingly, in the vast array of Star Wars titles and products. The Holocron isn't just for fun—when Lucas Licensing inks a deal with a toy company or a T-shirt designer, it vets those ancillary products to ensure they conform to the spirit and letter of the continuity that has come before and will continue afterward. In the past 31 years, Star Wars movies have grossed in excess of $4 billion worldwide. But retail sales of merchandise stand at $15 billion, and 20 percent of that has been earned since 2006, the year after the final film was released. Careful nurture of the Star Wars canon—thousands of years of story time, running through all the bits and pieces of merchandise—has kept the franchise popular for decades.

So Chee spends three-quarters of his typical workday consulting or updating the Holocron. He also approves packaging designs, scans novels for errors, and creates Talmudic charts and documents addressing such issues as which Jedi were still alive during the Clone Wars and how long it takes a spaceship to get from Dagobah, where Yoda trained Luke Skywalker, to Luke's homeworld of Tatooine. The Keeper of the Holocron takes this very seriously: "Someone has to be able to say, 'Luke Skywalker would not have that color of lightsaber.'"

Of course, as the article points out, there was plenty of stuff that came out before Chee's Holocron that isn't necessarily canon/apocrypha and there are levels of canonicity, but I'd think that conflicts are relatively minimal especially compared to the overall size of the universe in question. But I'll also admit that my knowledge of the Star Wars universe, in its various forms, is relatively small so I'll defer to others who have more knowledge than I.

Edited by opus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, you guys have convinced me. I put out an APB for the mini-series and first season to all my buds in the central Shenandoah Valley. The hubs and I are both unemployed and watching this sounds like a lovely.

Oh that's right, I am a freelance writer!

Edited by Annelise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Those things aren't really "canon", though. They're "apocrypha".

Last time I checked, Lucasarts considered the novels as accepted parts of the universe. That may've changed, since the last time I checked was eight or so years ago. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

opus wrote:

: FWIW, Star Wars does have its own "franchise continuity cop":

Oh, sure, I can remember how Lucasfilm claimed that all of their novels and comics etc. were consistent with one another back in the early '90s (i.e. before the "special editions", let alone the prequels, came out in theatres). I stopped reading them in the mid-'90s, partly because Kevin J. Anderson is such a bad writer and he was beginning to dominate the "extended universe" (as author, co-author and editor of multiple novels, comics and reference books) -- so I was thrilled when the prequels came out a few years later and introduced story elements that explicitly contradicted some of the major plot elements in Anderson's novels. (E.g., who designed the Death Star?)

Of course, the prequels also contradicted elements within the original movies, so whatever. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh, sure, I can remember how Lucasfilm claimed that all of their novels and comics etc. were consistent with one another back in the early '90s (i.e. before the "special editions", let alone the prequels, came out in theatres). I stopped reading them in the mid-'90s, partly because Kevin J. Anderson is such a bad writer and he was beginning to dominate the "extended universe" (as author, co-author and editor of multiple novels, comics and reference books) -- so I was thrilled when the prequels came out a few years later and introduced story elements that explicitly contradicted some of the major plot elements in Anderson's novels. (E.g., who designed the Death Star?)

YES. I cannot, I repeat, cannot possibly stress how accurate this is. I was a rabid Star Wars extended universe nut as a teen (I even owned close to $2000 in role-playing game sourcebooks, which built even more up). Anderson single-handledly killed any love for Star Wars, even before Lucas did with the prequels.

OK, back to BSG. I'm finishing up the last three episodes of season 3 tonight. I can't wait!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just finished season one tuesday night...

WOW.

also ordered the season 2.0/2.5 set -- it should be on its way as i type...

=D>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have to say -- the season one finale was a kick to the gut. truly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just got seasons 2.0/2.5...

quick question for the BG archons: where exactly does razor fit in?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...