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Greatest Musicals

What's YOUR favorite (movie) musical?  

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No Busby Berkeley?

No Jazz Singer? (which, whilst I'm on a rant, is conspicuously absent from the top 100)

No Fred and Ginger?

I declare this poll a farce!


"There is, it would seem, in the dimensional scale of the world a kind of delicate meeting place between imagination and knowledge, a point, arrived at by diminishing large things and enlarging small ones, that is intrinsically artistic" - Vladimir Nabokov

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To be absolutley fair to Channel 4 this *was* designed as a 'Most Popular' poll rather than 'Greatest' as most of the top 100 were very well known or recent. So of course there were none of the great thirties musicals and an over indulgence to Lloyd Webber.

But, yes, the number one choice is indeed wrong. Because it isn't Cabaret or Gold Diggers of 1933.

Phil.


"We live as if the world were as it should be, to show it what it can be." - Angel

"We don't do perms!" - Trevor and Simon

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I voted for Oklahoma! as a sentimental childhood favorite (it wasn't nearly as "girly" as The Sound of Music which my mom seemed to have playing constantly and thus became a favorite), but only because Cannibal! The Musical wasn't on the list.


"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

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Hegel with songs

The Sound of Music is a seriously religious film, its plot a fairytale version of modern Christian history

Theo Hobson, Guardian, September 7


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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anyone remember about Kael's review of Sound of Music (I believe the title is Sound of Mucus) and got the link???

I believe it was actually "The Sound of Money", but that's just OTTOMH.

Best musical of all time? Fantasia biggrin.gif

Edited by GreetingsEarthling

That's just how eye roll.

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I can't find the actual review, just several blurbs about how that review may have been what got her fired from McCall's.

Hmm I got this from a BBC News article:

Among some of her most famous reviews were her scathing comments about The Sound of Music in an article headlined The Sound of Money. 

And this from Wikipedia

At one point, she wrote a famously negative review of The Sound of Music, which allegedly resulted in her being fired from McCall's magazine (she referred to the movie as "The Sound of Mucus").

I found the following bit in this article.

For instance, here
Edited by DanBuck

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And a larger excerpt:

The Sound of Music

"Set in Austria in 1938, this is a tribute to freshness that is so mechanically engineered and so shrewdly calculated that the background music rises, the already soft focus blurs and melts, and, upon the instant, you can hear all those noses blowing in the theatre. Whom could this operetta offend? Only those of us who, despite the fact that we may respond, loathe being manipulated in this way and are aware of how cheap and ready-made are the responses we are made to feel. We may become even more aware of the way we have been turned into emotional and aesthetic imbeciles when we hear ourselves humming the sickly, goody-goody songs. The dauntless, scrubbed-face heroine (Julie Andrews), in training to become a nun, is sent from the convent to serve as governess to the motherless Von Trapp children, and turns them into a happy little troupe of singers before marrying their father (Christopher Plummer). She says goodbye to the nuns and leaves them outside at the fence, as she enters the cathedral to be married. Squeezed again, and the moisture comes out of thousands

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Man...Moulin Rouge and Singin' In the Rain...neck and neck!


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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I'm not sure any of my favorite five musicals are in that poll ("Singin' in the Rain" would be the closest). I am not sure what this says about me.

Dale


Metalfoot on Emmanuel Shall Come to Thee's Noel: "...this album is...monotony...bland, tripy fare..."

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I'm not sure any of my favorite five musicals are in that poll ("Singin' in the Rain" would be the closest). I am not sure what this says about me.

You know, I think I had the same thought back when I voted on this a couple of years ago. Except for the re-written ending, I love Little Shop of Horrors, and would have voted for it had it been on the list. I am glad there was no inclusion of Xanadu or the Bee Gee's Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band.


Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Seeing as we don;t have a dedicated Singin' in the Rain thread, can I just boast about my daughter Nina who sat through the whole of Singin' in the Rain yesterday afternoon at just 2.5 years old? We did actually skip out the "Broadway rhythm" bit, but otherwise she sat through, and enjoyed the whole thing.

Matt

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Cool. My own 2.5-year-olds were sitting through Seven Brides for Seven Brothers a couple months ago.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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One that isn't on the list is Paint Your Wagon. Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood singing!! (Well, they try to anyway.) It is a little long, but I still enjoy it.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Any "Great Musical" list that does not include CABARET is a complete sham.

As is any such list that does include Moulin Rouge.

Edited by mrmando

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

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Any "Great Musical" list that does not include CABARET is a complete sham.

As is any such list that does include Moulin Rouge.

Well, while I like MOULIN ROUGE! quite a bit, I could understand leaving it out. I'm not convinced it's really earned landmark status in the way that some other musicals have.

Edited by Ryan H.

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Exactly. Whatever landmark status it might have depends on its flouting of screen-musical conventions. It's the musical for people who don't like musicals.


Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

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Well, you like musicals in general, and you also like Moulin Rouge. My theory is that the film appeals strongly to people who, unlike you, don't like musicals in general. I'm not arguing the inverse of what I said, i.e., I am not saying MR doesn't appeal to fans-of-musicals, only that it does appeal to non-fans-of-musicals.


Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

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Well, you like musicals in general, and you also like Moulin Rouge. My theory is that the film appeals strongly to people who, unlike you, don't like musicals in general. I'm not arguing the inverse of what I said, i.e., I am not saying MR doesn't appeal to fans-of-musicals, only that it does appeal to non-fans-of-musicals.

You misunderstand me. I was indicating that in my personal experience, people who don't like musicals to begin with loathe MOULIN ROUGE. I haven't met a single individual who liked MOULIN ROUGE and wasn't already a fan of movie musicals.

Edited by Ryan H.

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You misunderstand me. I was indicating that in my personal experience, people who don't like musicals to begin with loathe MOULIN ROUGE. I haven't met a single individual who liked MOULIN ROUGE and wasn't already a fan of movie musicals.

Well, in that case I'm more puzzled than ever as to why anyone likes it. I literally can't watch it ... gives me motion sickness ... but I've complained about that enough in other threads.


Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

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QUOTE ... Of course, I also have a soft spot in my heart for [...] Little Shop of Horrors...

The movie version of LSoH is pretty irresistible, I confess. Has anyone else seen the stage version? Our university drama dept. put it on a couple of years ago, and I was surprised to discover that it's much more of a "morality play" than the movie version, with a darker ending. I liked it even better, despite the lack of Steve Martin, Ellen Greene, and Rick Moranis.

I played Seymour in the Seattle Eastside Theatre Co's version. FUN! Our lead got placed in a major motion picture and they asked me to sit in for the second and third runs...with five days notice. Hard work, but well worth the experience. I also like the ending better in a lot of ways: this sounds like someone's theatre dissertation! :lol:

I personally enjoyed both the stage and movie versions of "The Music Man." Incredible music writing, much more integral to the plot than most musicals have a tendency to be. Light-years beyond Grease!

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I pulled up this thread after searching for Singin' in the Rain, which I've probably seen a dozen times. Last night, though, I saw it for the first time: a. on a big screen and b. with my two-year-old daughter. Even with horrible digital projection, it was one of the best nights I've ever spent at the movies. I love MGM musicals, generally, and Gene Kelly is my favorite movie star, but Singin' in the Rain is just special.

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