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The full lineup hasn't been posted yet, but the festival site has just posted several teasers:

The festival's "World View", the main section of new international cinema, will showcase Boss of It All, the newest work by Denmark's Lars von Trier, Hal Hartley's Fay Grim featuring Jeff Goldblum and Parker Posey, Academy Award" Winner Roberto Benigni's The Tiger and the Snow and Johnnie To's Exiled. Also being presented are two films direct from The Sundance Film Festival, Rocket Science and Send a Bullet, produced by Washington, DC's own Joey Frank.

This year's geographical focus, "Voila Cinema!" will feature new French films. Included in this collection are The Ax, the latest from acclaimed director Costa Gavras and La Vie en Rose, about the life of celebrated French enchantress Edith Piaf.

Filmfest's new category, "Views from the News", will feature a series of films whose themes are "ripped from the headlines." In this collection are Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars, about a music band formed by refugees fleeing political oppression and trapped in an immigration camp, These Girls about the life of Egypt's street children and The God of a Second Chance, the latest work by Oscar" Winner Paul Wagner, on life for a Washington community east of the Anacostia River. "Global Rhythms," the festival's popular music-on-film series will again be featured.

--I'll post a link to the full lineup as soon as it's available, along with my annual plea for recommended titles.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Full Line-Up

Recommendations are welcome ... and needed!

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Strongly Recommended:

I think Alain Resnais' Private Fears in Public Places is Alain Resnais' best film since Mon Oncle d'Amerique. I really like the melding of longing and architectural memory on this one.

Barbara Albert's Falling is something like a thirty-something version of Take Care of My Cat, in this case, the death of a teacher brings a group of friends together for a weekend. It's more about the life trajectories (and intersections) of these women who are, in some ways, at the crossroads of their own lives, whether it's moving on from having just a job to a real career, or getting married, or settling down and having a child, or taking a new professional direction.

Denis Dercourt's The Page Turner is a well crafted thriller in the style of Claude Chabrol...slow brewing, ominous, and pitch perfect casting. The heroine is the M

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Thanks so much, acquarello!

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Ah pants, I'll be leaving town a few days before it starts :( That would have been fun.

"There is, it would seem, in the dimensional scale of the world a kind of delicate meeting place between imagination and knowledge, a point, arrived at by diminishing large things and enlarging small ones, that is intrinsically artistic" - Vladimir Nabokov

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Acquarello: What about Darrat, or Opera Jawa? I'm thinking I might go for those two. I'm guessing you've seen neither. What have you heard?

Gigi: I didn't realize you lived in the D.C. area. Or are you just visiting?

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I haven't heard any rumblings about Darrat or Opera Jawa, but that doesn't surprise me because third cinema is pretty underrepresented in general, even in New York. The descriptions do sound very promising. I might actually try to catch those and the new Goutam Ghose (Yatra, although the screening I'm eyeing conflicts with Opera Jawa). Ghose's films tend to be highly allegorical and meticulously composed.

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I haven't heard any rumblings about Darrat or Opera Jawa, but that doesn't surprise me because third cinema is pretty underrepresented in general, even in New York. The descriptions do sound very promising. I might actually try to catch those and the new Goutam Ghose (Yatra, although the screening I'm eyeing conflicts with Opera Jawa). Ghose's films tend to be highly allegorical and meticulously composed.

I went to purchase tickets last night at a local bookstore, only to learn that tickets didn't go on sale until today.

Guess I'll order 'em online.

I thought for a moment that your summary of "The Page Turner" had been used by the FilmFest folks, as happened last year (right? You weren't offended.), but no, it looks like the summaries differ slightly.

Looking at the current box-office numbers, I see that "The Cats of Mirikitani" and "The Page Turner" are already being distributed theatrically, so I'll probably skip those (hadn't really considered "Cats" in any case).

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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The New York Times reviewed "Daratt" recently -- another title that, it appears, has U.S. distribution -- so I went with Opera Jawa as this year's FilmFest DC selection.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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