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What I'm Watching This Weekend


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All I can say to anyone who has the chance to attend this is - go, Go, GO!

I have had the pleasure to spend time with Fred Wiseman as well as plan a discussion screening with him. The opportunity to spend time listening to this master is rewarding, add to that the chance to screen one of his films...well it is sublime (at least it was for me).

Also, Boxing Gym is an excellent documentary, easily a favorite film of 2010. For those not familiar with Wiseman or his films or those who may not be into documentaries or languid films this is a good selection.

...the kind of film criticism we do. We are talking about life, and more than that the possibility of abundant life." -M.Leary

"Dad, how does she move in mysterious ways?"" -- Jude (my 5-year-old, after listening to Mysterious Ways)

[once upon a time known here as asher]

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I have had the pleasure to spend time with Fred Wiseman as well as plan a discussion screening with him. The opportunity to spend time listening to this master is rewarding, add to that the chance to screen one of his films...well it is sublime (at least it was for me).

Too cool! Which film did you screen?

Edited by Nathaniel

"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

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Watching Lincoln tomorrow night, and something with the kids in the late morning or early afternoon.

Whenver I open up the possibility of watching something with all the kids, they

1. Shout with glee

2. Quickly square off: boys vs. girls

3. Start whining when one group suggests a movie that the other doesn't want to see (two boys vs. two girls means this happens with every suggested choice)

I then quiet everyone down with the threat that maybe we won't watch anything at all.

And then all the kids get morose and leave the room with frowns on their faces.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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More episodes of Breaking Bad. Years from now, whenever someone asks about my memories of the earliest days of my second child's life, I'll become wistful and say, "And every night I'd nestle her on my lap for her final bottle, and we'd watch a dire TV show about meth."

M/Other, a film I've been dying to see for seven years, is now streaming on Netflix, so I hope to see that, too.

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Breaking the Waves tonight, my first experience with Lars von Trier. Still not sure whether I'll ever be up for Antichrist.

This makes me laugh. It was Waves that I wasn't prepared for back when I first saw it. I love much of the director's work, but I've never revisited Waves, nor have I seen Antichrist.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Darren H wrote:

: Years from now, whenever someone asks about my memories of the earliest days of my second child's life, I'll become wistful and say, "And every night I'd nestle her on my lap for her final bottle, and we'd watch a dire TV show about meth."

I've been wistful for years for the days when I used to feed the twins at 3 in the morning while watching Aliens.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Paths of Glory tonight and hopefully Babette's Feast and Andrei Rublev this weekend. (Provided they both arrive at the library, which they should.)

Breaking the Waves tonight, my first experience with Lars von Trier. Still not sure whether I'll ever be up for Antichrist.

My first (and so far only) von Trier experience was Dogville, and I wasn't entirely prepared for that; I loved the artistry but found the tone very unsettling (in both a good and bad way). I'd like to know what you think of Breaking the Waves. I would like to see more von Trier, but have been holding off after Dogville, hoping to find something with a slightly lighter tone. I think I agree with you on Antichrist.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Maybe "lighter tone" was not the best choice of words. Less nihilistic? That's the best I can come up with, but I still don't completely like it. Grace's two alternatives at the end of Dogville was what bothered me about the film. You have intrigued me to see Breaking the Waves though.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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I don't think "lighter tone von Trier" is something that exists...

Perhaps: The Boss of it All

Definitely: The Five Obstructions

This weekend I'm definitely seeing Django Unchained. Also hoping to see Zero Dark Thirty.

At home I've got The Grey, and I've still got the two Woody Allen films from our marriage nominees.

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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Ooh, I forgot to report back re: Frederick Wiseman! He was a wonderful presence--sharp, sardonic, and hilarious. He came to film with a literary background, and to this day watches very few movies. The documentaries indeed have an immersive, novelistic effect. His editing technique is interesting: after all the footage has been shot, he looks at each take and determines which ones have promise. From there, he loosely cuts together sequences which could conceivably make the final cut. Then, he rates each of these sequences one to five stars. Keeping the best ones and discarding the rest, he finally works toward a final cut, locating inner rhythms and teasing out miniature narrative threads. It all sounds very organic and fascinating.

When Elvis Mitchell compared him with Bunuel, noting his ability to find irony in everyday situations, Wiseman thought for a moment, then replied with impeccable timing, "Well, it's not hard." That earned a huge laugh from the audience.

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Edited by Nathaniel

"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

Twitter     Letterboxd

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Yes, and evening with Wiseman is worth every minute from the wisdom of filmic perspective to his sardonic wit.

My weekend viewing are films by Jean Rouch

Moi, Un Noir

The Lion Hunters

...the kind of film criticism we do. We are talking about life, and more than that the possibility of abundant life." -M.Leary

"Dad, how does she move in mysterious ways?"" -- Jude (my 5-year-old, after listening to Mysterious Ways)

[once upon a time known here as asher]

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Ooh, I forgot to report back re: Frederick Wiseman! He was a wonderful presence--sharp, sardonic, and hilarious. He came to film with a literary background, and to this day watches very few movies. The documentaries indeed have an immersive, novelistic effect. His editing technique is interesting: after all the footage has been shot, he looks at each take and determines which ones have promise. From there, he loosely cuts together sequences which could conceivably make the final cut. Then, he rates each of these sequences one to five stars. Keeping the best ones and discarding the rest, he finally works toward a final cut, locating inner rhythms and teasing out miniature narrative threads. It all sounds very organic and fascinating.

When Elvis Mitchell compared him with Bunuel, noting his ability to find irony in everyday situations, Wiseman thought for a moment, then replied with impeccable timing, "Well, it's not hard." That earned a huge laugh from the audience.

Qft. Great response.

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

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Oslo, August 31, probably so I can kick myself for completing my Top 20 of 2012 list too soon.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Christian, I think my appreciation for the film derives largely from my vested interest in the story line. I can imagine someone not enjoying the film nearly as much as I did...

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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Hoping to get to THE FAMILY WAY and THE FACE OF ANOTHER before voting in the Top 25 poll. Also, maybe make a dent in those Japanese films I mentioned last week. Last weekend I ended up re-watching the two Assayas films I have instead.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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