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Andy Whitman

Drawing Conclusions

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Persona   

We'll keep you in our prayers.

You lucky dog.

-s.

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Chashab   

Andy:

Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU for your post, and more importantly for your effort. As a visual artist, I don't care how well people may be able to articulate their impressions of my work as long as they make an effort, in honesty. If we could get even half of the Church to think like you, to pursue some sort of self-education and apply themselves to the God-ordained pursuit of three-dimensional, plastic arts . . . I would be a very happy man.

Of course, 90% would be even better ;)

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Andy:

Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU for your post, and more importantly for your effort. As a visual artist, I don't care how well people may be able to articulate their impressions of my work as long as they make an effort, in honesty. If we could get even half of the Church to think like you, to pursue some sort of self-education and apply themselves to the God-ordained pursuit of three-dimensional, plastic arts . . . I would be a very happy man.

Of course, 90% would be even better ;)

Ditto to what Chashab has said here. Andy, I am impressed that you have realized a "blind spot" and are taking steps to do something about it.

I have to constantly remind myself that a large number of people, including many Christians, have no visual orientation whatever. More than 15 years ago, I asked a friend to give an opinion on a painting. This was a fellow whose opinions on literature and film I highly revered. He just begged off: Sorry, I have no sense for visual arts. Now he is married to a visual artist.

I love it when my wife tells me a parent of a friend of my kids has visited our house and seen my paintings and commented on them.

We had our priest over to the house about 5 years ago, and he trudged upstairs with my wife, doing the "house tour" thing. Going up our staircase, he walked directly between 2 fairly enormous paintings of mine, without comment. He apparently didn't even see them! ::doh::

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We had our priest over to the house about 5 years ago, and he trudged upstairs with my wife, doing the "house tour" thing. Going up our staircase, he walked directly between 2 fairly enormous paintings of mine, without comment. He apparently didn't even see them! ::doh::

Well, that's more "out there" than being at a loss for words concerning ameobas on beeswax. Particularly considering your more realist way of working. Personally, I'd think it out of the ordinary for anyone to have paintings on the wall at all. I mean REAL paintings. OTOH, what do you say to something you don't understand? I'd say that being at a loss for the complexity of a work or medium is more universal than you think. In music, most folks don't know the first thing about the sonata form. I personally don't "get" most of the musical jokes that 18th and 19th c. composers played on each other.

From the other side, I once heard my father talking with his best friend about music while listening to a reasonably pure audio rendering of one of Dad's favorite orchestral works. Dave (Dad's friend) said at one point, "You know, there's a lot of people out there who like this music, but hardly anyone would care about good high fidelity, or know it if they heard it."

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Well, that's more "out there" than being at a loss for words concerning ameobas on beeswax. Particularly considering your more realist way of working. Personally, I'd think it out of the ordinary for anyone to have paintings on the wall at all. I mean REAL paintings. OTOH, what do you say to something you don't understand? I'd say that being at a loss for the complexity of a work or medium is more universal than you think. In music, most folks don't know the first thing about the sonata form. I personally don't "get" most of the musical jokes that 18th and 19th c. composers played on each other.

From the other side, I once heard my father talking with his best friend about music while listening to a reasonably pure audio rendering of one of Dad's favorite orchestral works. Dave (Dad's friend) said at one point, "You know, there's a lot of people out there who like this music, but hardly anyone would care about good high fidelity, or know it if they heard it."

Way to steer the conversation around to music, Rich! This is the VISUAL ARTS forum; let's try to stay on topic, shall we?

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Well, that's more "out there" than being at a loss for words concerning ameobas on beeswax. Particularly considering your more realist way of working. Personally, I'd think it out of the ordinary for anyone to have paintings on the wall at all. I mean REAL paintings. OTOH, what do you say to something you don't understand? I'd say that being at a loss for the complexity of a work or medium is more universal than you think. In music, most folks don't know the first thing about the sonata form. I personally don't "get" most of the musical jokes that 18th and 19th c. composers played on each other.

From the other side, I once heard my father talking with his best friend about music while listening to a reasonably pure audio rendering of one of Dad's favorite orchestral works. Dave (Dad's friend) said at one point, "You know, there's a lot of people out there who like this music, but hardly anyone would care about good high fidelity, or know it if they heard it."

Way to steer the conversation around to music, Rich! This is the VISUAL ARTS forum; let's try to stay on topic, shall we?

Sorry. My intentions were merely illustrative by analogy. It was not meant to smuggle contraband media. By ommission, maybe I am sharing in Andy's cluelessness.

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