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Peter T Chattaway

Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

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Matt, doesn't open here for another week. I too see a screening tonight. I saw a presentation of some clips narrated by producer Mark Johnson for journalists that would be interviewing Georgie Henley and Will Poulter while they were in Beverly Hills briefly.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Has no-one seen this yet? No church preview-a-thons? I'll be seeing it as a paying customer in a week.

Matt

Saturday.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Has no-one seen this yet? No church preview-a-thons? I'll be seeing it as a paying customer in a week.

I saw a church preview-a-thon (non-final-cut) last week and will be catching the final cut tonight.

How was the not-final-cut?


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How was the not-final-cut?

Remarkably like the final cut. I think some of the dialogue might have been different but I'm not sure.

Nice to see it twice. A rare privilege. Really cements my thoughts. (Once in 2D and once in 3D too.)


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I took my 4.8-year-old daughter to the press screening this morning, and it was one of the best outings of my life -- or at least since the twins were born.

That's not necessarily a comment on the film, BTW. I'm just saying we had a really, really good morning: riding the SkyTrain, following the blue arrow in Google Maps on my phone as our train took us downtown, going out for lunch, etc. etc., and I was really, really pleased to see how she threw her garbage away properly, recognized and obeyed the "no food" signs at the SkyTrain station, and even reminded me to use soap when I washed my hands after lunch. Oh, and the publicist was amused when I wrote down my two-sentence reaction to the film and my daughter grabbed a pen and, on the same sheet I was using, wrote out the initials for every member of our family. Many special memories.

And then we came home and my 2.8-year-old was so happy to see me that he took off one of my socks and began wiping his face with it, grinning all the way. I have no idea what that was about.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Queen Elizabeth "shed tears" at Narnia film ending: Neeson

Describing a poignant scene toward the end of the third film in the blockbuster series, "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader," actor Liam Neeson said he became emotional during its royal world premiere earlier this week.

"I shed a tear the other night and I was told the Queen shed a few tears as well," he told a news conference on Thursday.

http://omg.yahoo.com/news/queen-elizabeth-shed-tears-at-narnia-film-ending-neeson/51575


Edward Curtis

Morgantown, WV

Hold the physician in honor, for he is essential to you, and God it was who created his profession. Sirach 38:1 NAB

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FWIW, it occurs to me that the book came out in 1952, which was also the year that King George died and Elizabeth became Queen (though IIRC, her official coronation wasn't until 1953). I have no idea how tuned in to children's literature the Queen was at the time (she did have two children by then), or whether she was making the connection when she saw the film, but still, it's an interesting coincidence.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I hope I can assume what I saw today was a final cut. Wouldn't want to give them any room to mess up anything they got right.

I'll withhold my thoughts on the movie for now, but boy does this one have the audience in its grip. It's like they went out and found people who LOVE the franchise so far and packed the place with them.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Jeffrey: Why must you go and ruin EVERYTHING?! :) I mean, here I was, feeling kind of settled about the movie, and then you gotta throw this into the mix.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Jeffrey: Why must you go and ruin EVERYTHING?! :) I mean, here I was, feeling kind of settled about the movie, and then you gotta throw this into the mix.

Talk about a tempest in a teapot.


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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Jeffrey: Why must you go and ruin EVERYTHING?! :) I mean, here I was, feeling kind of settled about the movie, and then you gotta throw this into the mix.

Talk about a tempest in a teapot.

Indeed. Since when do actors' attempted deep thoughts have anything to do with anything? Jeff, remember the LOTR junket when Merry and Pippin (or Flippy and Trippy as someone called them) told us that LOTR was all about environmentalism?


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Jeffrey: Why must you go and ruin EVERYTHING?! :) I mean, here I was, feeling kind of settled about the movie, and then you gotta throw this into the mix.

Talk about a tempest in a teapot.

Indeed. Since when do actors' attempted deep thoughts have anything to do with anything? Jeff, remember the LOTR junket when Merry and Pippin (or Flippy and Trippy as someone called them) told us that LOTR was all about environmentalism?

Yeah, everyone knows it's about Marxism.


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Jeffrey: Why must you go and ruin EVERYTHING?! :) I mean, here I was, feeling kind of settled about the movie, and then you gotta throw this into the mix.

Neeson can say whatever he wants. Right or wrong, I don't care....much. It's when the directors and writers (story and script) say the wrong thing that my heart starts to sink!

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Indeed. Since when do actors' attempted deep thoughts have anything to do with anything? Jeff, remember the LOTR junket when Merry and Pippin (or Flippy and Trippy as someone called them) told us that LOTR was all about environmentalism?

"All about" is perhaps a bit much, but I don't think it's unreasonable to see an ecological vision in Tolkien's work that could be construed as "environmentalist" in some sense. I know a good friend (Roman Catholic BTW) who is in the Tolkien graduate seminar that I'm taking and writing on the ecological nature of the Elves.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Yes, Anders, I agree there's an ecological (and specifically anti-industrial) motif in LOTR. Flippy and Trippy weren't as far wrong as Neeson. One might possibly make an argument that Aslan's followers include followers of Muhammad and Buddha as well as of Christ. But Neeson is really signaling patronizing contempt for all religions as well as Christianity. Aslan created Narnia. The Narnians worship Aslan. To suggest that that's Muhammad and Buddha as well as Christ is blasphemous to Muslims and far from the mark for Buddhists (especially Theraveda Buddhists).


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Yes, Anders, I agree there's an ecological (and specifically anti-industrial) motif in LOTR. Flippy and Trippy weren't as far wrong as Neeson. One might possibly make an argument that Aslan's followers include followers of Muhammad and Buddha as well as of Christ. But Neeson is really signaling patronizing contempt for all religions as well as Christianity. Aslan created Narnia. The Narnians worship Aslan. To suggest that that's Muhammad and Buddha as well as Christ is blasphemous to Muslims and far from the mark for Buddhists (especially Theraveda Buddhists).

Oh, I'm completely with you as far as Neeson's comments. Seriously condescending.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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And all I did was post a link that made me a fleeting chuckle. Not sure why it seems to have been received as a crisis. Of course I know that actors often have no understanding of the words they're bringing to life. Hell, Ian McKellan thought the moral of The Lord of the Rings was "Hobbiton is a happy place because it has no church."

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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And all I did was post a link that made me a fleeting chuckle. Not sure why it seems to have been received as a crisis. Of course I know that actors often have no understanding of the words they're bringing to life. Hell, Ian McKellan thought the moral of The Lord of the Rings was "Hobbiton is a happy place because it has no church."

Didn't I say it was a tempest in a teapot? Most of the other replies have been elaborations on that theme. No need to swear :)

Edited by BethR

There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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Jeffrey: Why must you go and ruin EVERYTHING?! :) I mean, here I was, feeling kind of settled about the movie, and then you gotta throw this into the mix.

Talk about a tempest in a teapot.

Indeed. Since when do actors' attempted deep thoughts have anything to do with anything? Jeff, remember the LOTR junket when Merry and Pippin (or Flippy and Trippy as someone called them) told us that LOTR was all about environmentalism?

Too strong in the "all about", but Tolkien's dislike of the modern world and machinery, and his love of nature would be hard to overstate. Both are very much there is a subtext throughout LOTR. (And in fact becomes just plain text when it comes to the Ents.) Further, if Flippy and Trippy were talking about the movie (especially TTT), they were even closer to the mark, as Jackson found the environmental subtext of great use to his visual storytelling.

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And all I did was post a link that made me a fleeting chuckle. Not sure why it seems to have been received as a crisis. Of course I know that actors often have no understanding of the words they're bringing to life. Hell, Ian McKellan thought the moral of The Lord of the Rings was "Hobbiton is a happy place because it has no church."

Yeah, McKellan is off the mark big time. My professor encouraged me to write an essay on why Hobbiton is actually a dystopia, rather than a eutopia.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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My professor encouraged me to write an essay on why Hobbiton is actually a dystopia, rather than a eutopia.

Great subject. I've lectured on that very thing. One of the most overlooked but important purposes of Tolkien's epic: the corrective to a Hobbit's lifestyle. (And yet, there is so much that the Hobbits understand better than the Big People.)


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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My professor encouraged me to write an essay on why Hobbiton is actually a dystopia, rather than a eutopia.

Great subject. I've lectured on that very thing. One of the most overlooked but important purposes of Tolkien's epic: the corrective to a Hobbit's lifestyle. (And yet, there is so much that the Hobbits understand better than the Big People.)

So true.

This thread is not making me any more excited to see VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER, rather it's making me happy to be spending this week deep in Tolkien's legendarium (and planning a viewing of Jackson's films for Christmas time, as I haven't watched them in 4-5 years).


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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I must say, I do rather like this scene, and the way what seems like Reepicheep's assertion of authority over Eustace very quickly segues into something almost positive and helpful, the way his demand for "satisfaction" very quickly becomes an attempt to help Eustace grow (in fighting skills but also, implicitly, as a person, too):


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I must say, I do rather like this scene, and the way what seems like Reepicheep's assertion of authority over Eustace very quickly segues into something almost positive and helpful, the way his demand for "satisfaction" very quickly becomes an attempt to help Eustace grow (in fighting skills but also, implicitly, as a person, too):

Yes, I really liked this scene too. Good characterization of Reep, nicely cinematic extrapolation of the scene in the book, and a very nice exchange between Reep and Eustace at the end.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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