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Oscars 2004: Cinematography

Which film should win for cinematography?  

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BTW, having seen The Return of the King again yesterday, I can understand why Andrew Lesnie was not nominated for his cinematography, despite having won the Oscar for The Fellowship of the Ring. Quite simply, whereas TFotR was awash in beautiful natural images as well as stunning interior shots, TRotK is almost wall-to-wall special-effects shots -- and I wonder if the obvious digital colour grading throughout this trilogy may have also lessened the Academy's appreciation for the things Lesnie may have tried to do in-camera.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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That's interesting, AlanW. So he has done at least two films -- Girl with a Pearl Earring and What Dreams May Come -- that were cinematic recreations of classic paintings. I wonder if there's anything else like that in his ouevre.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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and I wonder if the obvious digital colour grading throughout this trilogy may have also lessened the Academy's appreciation for the things Lesnie may have tried to do in-camera.

But that would also have affected Cold Mountain (which had some color washed out) and City of God (which was a roller coaster of artifical tones, lots of lenses in that film). Were the first two nominated for this award?


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

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I wonder if there's anything else like that in his ouevre.

I just want to go on the record and say that I had not read this post before I used the word "ouevre" in my post to Andrew Coffin earlier today in the "Von Trier" thread. 8O

I was feeling pretty good about myself at the time. I even looked up the word in an online dictionary, to make sure I spelled it correctly.

Hey, wait just a minute. I think Peter spelled it wrong! Ahhhh ... vindication. (of a sort) ohmy.gif Guess I shouldn't have put Peter's spelling in quote marks above...

And no, I don't want Peter or anyone else to point out the myriad spelling and grammatical mistakes in my nearly 400 posts on this board. It's so humbling. I type up a post, review it before I submit it, hit "Submit," then, if it's a good day, I discover my mistakes and fix them before everyone reads them. If it's a bad day ... [shiver].


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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