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Andy Whitman

Barry*

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I think that was the saddest thing in sports I've ever witnessed. I don't care that the man is an insufferably smug, petulant jerk. Baseball has had its share of insufferable boors.

I do care, very much, that he cheated to get the record. I don't care that he hasn't been officially convicted. Yeah, I know, innocent until proven guilty, and all that. I don't care. He cheated.

Hank Aaron deserved better, and so did Babe Ruth, and so did anyone who actually cares about the integrity of the game of baseball. Take your meaningless record and cram it, Barry, right where the sun doesn't shine, or anywhere else you rubbed the clear and the cream.

Edited by Andy Whitman

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I think that was the saddest thing in sports I've ever witnessed. I don't care that the man is an insufferably smug, petulant jerk. Baseball has had its share of insufferable boors.

I do care, very much, that he cheated to get the record. I don't care that he hasn't been officially convicted. Yeah, I know, innocent until proven guilty, and all that. I don't care. He cheated.

Hank Aaron deserved better, and so did Babe Ruth, and so did anyone who actually cares about the integrity of the game of baseball. Take your meaningless record and cram it, Barry, right where the sun doesn't shine, or anywhere else you rubbed the clear and the cream.

Of note is that the HR ball, caught by a Yankees fan, is projected to go for $300K to 400K, almost $3M less than McGwire's record breaker.

Nice to see that the free market acknowledges the "*" around Barry's record and is discounting accordingly. If only Junior hadn't been hurt these last several seasons with the Reds, and we'd be soon celebrating a legitimate HR king.

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Of note is that the HR ball, caught by a Yankees fan, is projected to go for $300K to 400K, almost $3M less than McGwire's record breaker.

Nice to see that the free market acknowledges the "*" around Barry's record and is discounting accordingly. If only Junior hadn't been hurt these last several seasons with the Reds, and we'd be soon celebrating a legitimate HR king.

And yet, McGwire's (now broken) record is just as tainted.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Of note is that the HR ball, caught by a Yankees fan, is projected to go for $300K to 400K, almost $3M less than McGwire's record breaker.

Nice to see that the free market acknowledges the "*" around Barry's record and is discounting accordingly. If only Junior hadn't been hurt these last several seasons with the Reds, and we'd be soon celebrating a legitimate HR king.

And yet, McGwire's (now broken) record is just as tainted.

That's right. And surely wouldn't fetch $3M now, given his creatine binge during the record breaking season. Its a different world now, thanks in part to McGwire's pitiful congressional testimony.

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Of course, when you consider that many MLB pitchers have likely been using steroids just as much, influencing their performance and posing unfair challenges to even the most honest batters, how are we to measure any batter's achievement? You could say that Bonds has performed powerfully (with help) against cheating pitchers, and thus his achievement is still rather extraordinary.

I'm not a Bonds fan by any stretch of the imagination, but the judge and jury should convict not just Bonds here, but an entire league waist-deep in corruption that has made it impossible to measure or appreciate any kind of achievement.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Of note is that the HR ball, caught by a Yankees fan, is projected to go for $300K to 400K, almost $3M less than McGwire's record breaker.

Nice to see that the free market acknowledges the "*" around Barry's record and is discounting accordingly. If only Junior hadn't been hurt these last several seasons with the Reds, and we'd be soon celebrating a legitimate HR king.

And yet, McGwire's (now broken) record is just as tainted.

That's right. And surely wouldn't fetch $3M now, given his creatine binge during the record breaking season. Its a different world now, thanks in part to McGwire's pitiful congressional testimony.

I don't remember what exactly McGwire testified, and I don't doubt that that dude took some serious steroids, but creatine's a very different issue than steroids, and one that's still perfectly legal, and allowed by MLB. So I wouldn't say that McGwire's creatine use specifically casts a shadow on that record, but rather the growing acceptance that we all let ourselves be "duped" by that year's home run chase because we didn't want to believe that either of guys would actually take steroids...


"You guys don't really know who you're dealing with."

"Oh yeah, and who exactly are we dealing with?"

"I'm the mother flippin' rhymenoceros."

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Of course, when you consider that many MLB pitchers have likely been using steroids just as much, influencing their performance and posing unfair challenges to even the most honest batters, how are we to measure any batter's achievement? You could say that Bonds has performed powerfully (with help) against cheating pitchers, and thus his achievement is still rather extraordinary.

I'm not a Bonds fan by any stretch of the imagination, but the judge and jury should convict not just Bonds here, but an entire league waist-deep in corruption that has made it impossible to measure or appreciate any kind of achievement.

The advantage of steroids is considerably less for pitchers than for power hitters (power hitters are where steroids have the most obvious effect). Steroids aren't going to help anybody steal bases, either, or make a great play in the hole. It is precisely the Bonds and McGwires who benefit the most from these chemicals that have modest, or even adverse, effects on other areas of the game.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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I've grown into a Bonds-defender over the past few months. I like that he makes us confront the sports-sentimentality that seeps into popular consciousness. Did the guy juice? Sure, like lots and lots of MLB players did. Barry's the only one who was able to manage it for long-term power number surges, where the less inherently talented McGwires and Sosas and Ken Caminitis had their bodies break down fairly quickly. Bonds's body is failing, too, but I like that he held on long enough to break the record so that we have to regularly confront the inconsistent ways in which we respond to sports figures. There were so many people hoping he'd retire and go away so that all of that complicity and hypocrisy could be swept under the rug.

Hmm. That's an approach I hadn't thought of. It is said that pitching has been unexamined in this debate so far, but according to this guy Barry has had help of a more significant kind from the armor he uses on his lead elbow:

http://editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/a...t_id=1003621797

But apart from all that, what's there to be worked up over? The HR record will belong to Alex Rodriguez within the next ten years, and we can all turn our attention to whether or not he "deserves" it.

We'll see. They said that about Griffey, Jr. and Willie Mays too. AND, will Bonds push the number close to 800?


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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The article says that his armor is illegal, but he's grandfathered in because of a"pre-existing" injury at the rule's inception. Baseball never really changes, eh?


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Ahem, or Link to the 'Barry Bonds Joins 700 Club' thread -- take your pick.

- - -

Give the devil his due

Much of the commentary about Barry Bonds' capture of the all-time home run record has reminded me of the joke about the guy in the bar who is asked if his girlfriend's breasts are real. "God, I hope so," he says. "I paid so much, I'd hate to think I was imagining them." . . .

Stop for a moment and connect the dots between the things that have defined Bonds' career in the 21st century -- his cultivation of crazy underground pharmacists, his early switch to the maple bat. If Witte is right, he even pulled off the deliberate transformation, in front of millions of unsuspecting witnesses, of an uncontroversial piece of equipment into a secret hitting aid. If it's all true, surely Bonds is the most devious and admirable baseball villain since Ty Cobb. Has there ever been a ballplayer this innovative, this passionate about finding new ways to compete and defy age? I suspect that the future, with its more flexible ideas about body modification and cybernetics, may revere Bonds for precisely the reasons most of us loathe him. . . .

Colby Cosh, National Post, August 10


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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FTR, I can't stand BB, but mostly because he is a "insufferably smug, petulant jerk."

But I wonder whether the shoes he stands in are better built than Hank Aaron's were. Perhaps all MLB players should give up their shoes and go back to using whatever kind it was that Hank Aaron used.

I wonder whether or not BB has ever taken a Tylenol for a headache. Hank Aaron probably didn't have as strong of a medication in his day. Perhaps we shouldn't allow MLB players the use of any pain medication at all.

etc etc et al you get my point.

The human body is changing. Our kids will be competing against kids who have been preordained to be better looking, taller (won't be hard in my case) and smarter.

The world has changed. Man raises their Americanized Tower of Babel. Get used to it. Steroids are only the beginning. Gattaca is next.

-s.

Edited by stef

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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