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Funerals on film

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My memory's fuzzy, but doesn't "Gandhi" begin with something like a funeral procession?

A funeral is central to "The Big Chill".

Edited by David

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THE LOVED ONE, from Evelyn Waugh's satiric novel;

IMDb: "Newly arrived in Hollywood from England, Dennis Barlow finds he has to arrange his uncle's interment at the highly-organised and very profitable Whispering Glades funeral parlour. His fancy is caught by one of their cosmeticians, Aimee Thanatogenos. But he has three problems - the strict rules of owner Blessed Reverand Glenworthy, the rivalry of embalmer Mr Joyboy, and the shame of now working himself at The Happy Hunting Ground pets' memorial home."

If you include documentaries, how about Errol Morris's GATES OF HEAVEN?

IMDb: "Funny, inspiring, and bizarre, "Gates of Heaven" is the celebrated pet cemeteries documentary that is in reality an unorthodox look at life. Inspired by an article entitled "450 Dead Pets Going to Napa Valley," Errol Morris set out to capture the event which centered around the transport of hundreds of animal remains from one pet cemetery to another. Pet cemetery proprietors, embalmers, pet owners and others speak about life, work, and feelings."

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: Can propaganda be veiled?

I think so, but haven't the time to explain it just now.

one for another day maybe

Matt

The short explanation is YES! It's called subliminal manipulation.

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I'm about to start my PhD on iconic funerals of the 60s and 70s in the US. I'm specifically looking at how these events mediate national memory.

More widely, I'm interested in the representation of funerals and mourning across popular culture - both factual and fictional. These can be personal or social and can be obvious - for example Bobby has some archival footage of RFK's funeral at the end - or more subtle, eg. Spike Lee's When The Levees Broke is a prolonged eulogy shaped by a New Orleansean performative approach to death & mourning. This may also not be apparent in the first instance, or even intentionally incorporated into the film - JFK can be seen as a public exclamation of grief, and a nation's continued attempt to understand a traumatic event. Abel Ferrera's The Funeral looks at family structures but also represents a character based approach to the social rites of funerals.

Any ideas, people? Would be nice if you could give a brief description and/or analysis rather than just a list of titles. Not that I'm trying to get you to do my work for me, just gives me more to go on and hopefully kick start a critical discussion.

Thanks :)

The mere mention of the word "funeral" congers up memories of JFK's procession funeral with Jackie, Caroline and little John John saluting his father.

It was the same with Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy and Princess Diana's funerals. I believe that these televised events made an indelible mark on everyone's psyche.

Yet for me, the most profound expression of overwhelming loss came in the form of eulogy via a poem by W.H. Auden in Four Weddings and a Funeral.

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,

Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,

Silence the pianos and with muffled drum

Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead

Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead,

Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,

Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,

My working week and my Sunday rest,

My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;

I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now: put out every one;

Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;

Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood.

For nothing now can ever come to any good.

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There are funerals in Three Colors: Blue and Three Colors: White, which makes me think there must be one in Red, but I can't remember it.

There's a funeral in Code Unknown, albeit a brief one.

Twin Peaks.

I suspect there's one in Death at a Funeral.

Edited by Overstreet

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The mere mention of the word "funeral" congers up memories of JFK's procession funeral with Jackie, Caroline and little John John saluting his father.

It was the same with Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy and Princess Diana's funerals. I believe that these televised events made an indelible mark on everyone's psyche.

Yet for me, the most profound expression of overwhelming loss came in the form of eulogy via a poem by W.H. Auden in Four Weddings and a Funeral.

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,

Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,

Silence the pianos and with muffled drum

Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead

Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead,

Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,

Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,

My working week and my Sunday rest,

My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;

I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now: put out every one;

Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;

Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood.

For nothing now can ever come to any good.

I'm about to start my PhD on iconic funerals of the 60s and 70s in the US. I'm specifically looking at how these events mediate national memory.

More widely, I'm interested in the representation of funerals and mourning across popular culture - both factual and fictional. These can be personal or social and can be obvious - for example Bobby has some archival footage of RFK's funeral at the end - or more subtle, eg. Spike Lee's When The Levees Broke is a prolonged eulogy shaped by a New Orleansean performative approach to death & mourning. This may also not be apparent in the first instance, or even intentionally incorporated into the film - JFK can be seen as a public exclamation of grief, and a nation's continued attempt to understand a traumatic event. Abel Ferrera's The Funeral looks at family structures but also represents a character based approach to the social rites of funerals.

Any ideas, people? Would be nice if you could give a brief description and/or analysis rather than just a list of titles. Not that I'm trying to get you to do my work for me, just gives me more to go on and hopefully kick start a critical discussion.

Thanks :)

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