Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Greg P

Getting Healthy

Recommended Posts

I've never salted my food (just never was taught to do it) so, fortunately, that's not been a major issue.

Just wanted to say, in general, I've always had more success changing eating/drinking habits than I have simply withdrawing. That is to say, I find it easier to resolve (and stick to), "I"m going to drink more water..." than "I'm going to drink less soda." The one usually leads to the other, but how you get there sometimes makes it easier...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So sorry to hear about your health crisis, Peter, I hope you're feeling better. And thanks for the app suggestion, Darren, I just downloaded it to my Kindle Fire.

I've always been a pretty active person, hiking and biking on weekends, biking to work. But when I was hired by UCLA last year, that required a 70-mile daily commute, and I wouldn't be biking that. And the commute meant I would have less time at home, effectively no time before dinner, and I wanted to focus on spending time with my daughter every night rather than going to the gym.

So my workout vanished, and I soon found myself sitting at my desk and the vanpool virtually all day, and the lack of exercise was (literally) killing me.

Fortunately for me, UCLA started a free strength and flexibility program (but attendance required) for faculty/staff--a three-month class in stretching and weight training 3-4 times a week--so I signed up for it during my lunch hour (and eat at my desk). Happy to say that today marks the final workout for the class (I can't believe 12 weeks have gone by!) and that I'm enjoying it much more than I thought I would. I always hated gym classes. But the next class begins next week, and I'm definitely signing up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's great, Doug. You didn't mention weight, but I took "killing me" as a reference, in large part, to putting on some pounds.

Weight is on my mind this week. After a final "blowout week" while our kids were away, during which Sarah and I went out to eat four nights in a row, we're both now watching out food intake again. I wish I could report that I'm supplementing the diet with exercise, but a somewhat brisk 20-minute morning walk, three times a week, is all I've been doing for the past several weeks. My left ankle still flairs (flares?) up from time to time, although I'm reluctant to get the same test done on it that I had done on my right ankle several months ago. I keep hoping the pain, which isn't too severe unless I do some serious exercise, will go away. We all know it's not going to, right?


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not weight so much, actually, but a pinched nerve in my shoulder and the first signs of carpal tunnel, headaches and dizziness, eye strain (from focusing on the computer all day long) and general psychological claustrophobia. I couldn't read on the van, either--for the first time in my life, I got car sick any time I tried. But audiobooks have helped with that as well.

Be kind to your ankle!

Edited by Doug C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug, your day sounds a lot like mine. I leave the house at 7:15, get home a little before 6:00, and spend as much of the next three hours as possible with Rory. In the spring and fall, we spend most of every evening playing outside, but this summer has been so oppressively hot, we usually end up reading, drawing, doing puzzles -- all relatively positive types of entertainment, but also sedentary. Once Rory's in bed (she's always been a late-to-bed, late-to-rise kid), I'm either too tired or it's too late to exercise. I've gained 5 or 6 pounds this summer and it's all from laziness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, the only way I'm managing is to do my workout at UCLA during my lunch break. And actually, having a class with instructors helps me a lot, too. I'm not a structured person in general, and if left to my own devices, I'd probably do the same exercise everyday or only show up half the time.

Alex was 2-3 when I was freelancing from home and spending lots of time with her, and it was really hard for both of us when I started my full-time job. Now I get home exhausted, and she's just up from her nap and wants to play the second I walk through the door. She's so adorable--actually sits with her stuffed animals on our doorstep beginning around 5:30 just waiting for me to come home despite anything Katie might say to her to dissuade her.

Final workout today: ran a mile, 100 ring pulls, 200 pushups, 300 squats, and ran another mile. It's hard to type.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug C wrote:

: So sorry to hear about your health crisis, Peter, I hope you're feeling better.

Thanks, Doug. I'm getting there, I think.

I hear ya about commutes. When I lived in downtown Vancouver, I got to walk pretty much everywhere, so walking wasn't something I had to go out of my way for. (I also didn't have kids until shortly before I moved out of there, so that helped, too.) But now that we live in Surrey? It's pretty much impossible to go anywhere -- even without the kids -- without driving or taking the bus. So if I'm going to do more walking, I have to go out of my way and make an effort to do it. (And I've got to do it when the kids are in school, or with their mother, or something.)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter, I was just reminded today that a little fruit juice mixed with seltzer water is a great substitute for soda when you really have the craving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I better throw my hat into this ring.

I recently signed up for Weight Watchers. I need the sense of obligation. It's been doing well by me so far; I seem to be losing weight at a steady rate. I need to add exercise to my routine, but I'm generally just a bit too exhausted for it. (Maybe if I can be disciplined enough to get it out of the way in the AM before work.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope it goes well, Ryan. Don't beat yourself up too much if you don't exercise.* Just make sure you eat right. That should do the trick in terms of weight loss.

*These statements are my own. Please check with your doctor about ... oh, just do what I say, OK? <------ that's bad advice!


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope it goes well, Ryan. Don't beat yourself up too much if you don't exercise.* Just make sure you eat right. That should do the trick in terms of weight loss.

*These statements are my own. Please check with your doctor about ... oh, just do what I say, OK? <------ that's bad advice!

Well, exercise will aid the weight loss. And I've got a good amount to lose, so every bit helps. smile.png

But, as I said, going by the Weight Watchers guidelines, I've been losing weight at a steady and significant rate so far. It's definitely been helping me reform my habits, which are just terrible.

Edited by Ryan H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't run since early this year, after being diagnosed with a second stress fracture. I've done some morning walks. I'd like to get back to running.

I had a couple of appointments with a sports medicine specialist who helped to diagnose the stress fractures, and who gave me some rehab instructions and stretching exercises. I wasn't clear how the latter were helping, but I think they were to treat plantar fasciitis -- something I don't recall he ever diagnosed.

After a period of mild depression/regret about how things had turned out, I was left with the gnawing feeling that the doctor, although helpful, probably wasn't someone I wanted to see again. After months of doing nothing, I this week looked up another podiatrist in the hopes I could get a second opinion about my condition, and some further thoughts about possibly running again. I'm not sure what I'm looking for, exactly, but yesterday morning I made an appointment to be seen by the new doctor late Tuesday afternoon.

The approaching hurricane is now scheduled to peak Tuesday in terms of it impact to the area. I'm not sure the appointment will hold, but if not, I'll reschedule. I need to do something. I need another opinion from a professional about what I might be able to do in terms of running again, and when.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I haven't posted in this thread for a long, long time. I'm just stopping by to say that I plan to enter another bodybuilding contest in July, 2013, just after my 55th birthday.

I actually tried quitting bodybuilding for a while, to become a beer connoisseur, but after several months, I missed the discipline and structure of the bodybuilding lifestyle, so I made plans to enter another contest. I'm no good at it, really, but doing it helps me be better in other areas of life.


Yours truly,

ABP

No one with a good car needs to be justified. -- Hazel Motes

In the final end, he won the wars, after losin' every battle.-- Bob Dylan, Idiot Wind

Hot Rod Anglican blog ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For you runners out there.... I heard about this Iphone app on NPR today.... Zombies, Run!

Description

SPECIAL 50% OFF SALE ENDING SOON!

You tie your shoes, put on your headphones, take your first steps outside. You’ve barely covered 100 yards when you hear them. They must be close. You can hear every guttural breath, every rattling groan - they’re everywhere. Zombies. There’s only one thing you can do: Run!

Zombies, Run! is an ultra-immersive running game and audio adventure, co-created with award-winning novelist Naomi Alderman. We deliver the story straight to your headphones through orders and voice recordings - and when you get back home, you use the supplies you’ve collected while running to build and grow your base.

BBC NEWS - “The only way to save yourself is to run for real.”

WIRED - “In the style of Runkeeper, with an exciting undead twist.”

LIFEHACKER - “A really cool way to get outside and exercise.”

CNN - “Turns exercise into a game - a terrifying, terrifying game.”

NPR - "It gets you moving!"

TIME.COM - "Takes all the fun of a zombie game and funnels it into a fitness app."

WHAT PLAYERS SAY:

“Evaded all zombie mobs :-) One of my best sprints ever; this app works!”

“This game will make you sweat. Perfect junction between game design and run tracker.”

“Just tried @zombiesrungame and for the first time in my life I feel truly alive.”

WALK, JOG, OR RUN ANYWHERE

Zombies, Run! works anywhere and at any speed. You can jog in a park, run along a beach, or walk along a trail. It even works on treadmills!

YOU ARE RUNNER 5

Hundreds of lives are counting on you. You've got to rebuild your base from a few shivering survivors into a fortified beacon of civilization by collecting critical supplies and avoiding roving zombie hordes. Can you save them and learn the truth about the zombie apocalypse?

A WORLD OF STORIES

With 33 missions and over 45 runs worth of gameplay, you become the hero in an epic story of humanity’s struggle for survival where your running *really* matters - and there’s a deeper mystery to be uncovered as well...

YOUR OWN MIX

Choose your own custom playlists before you start running: the story unfolds in between your tracks through a series of dynamic radio messages and voice recordings.

INTERVAL TRAINING - WITH ZOMBIES

With our optional ‘Zombie Chases’ mode, you’ll need to increase your speed and work up a sweat if you hear zombies on your tail. That’s right - we’ve made interval training *fun*!

VIEW YOUR RUNS ONLINE WITH ZOMBIELINK

Register with our free ZombieLink service to view and share your runs online, complete with maps (coming very soon), full run history, and the ability to ‘play back’ zombie chases so you can see how much faster you ran when the living dead were right behind you! Plus you can sync your runs with Runkeeper and export them as GPX files.

KEEP THE SURVIVORS ALIVE

You automatically collect items like medicine, batteries, and ammo while running - but when you're back home, who needs them more: the soldiers or the doctors? Which buildings need extra defenses? It’s up to you - and the bigger your base, the more missions you can play.


Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the course of the past two years, I've really struggled with maintaining a steady running regimen. My eating habits have remained sensibly low-carb and protein-rich-- I also completely removed beer and scotch from my weekend dining and R&R habits -- but still my waistline continued to slowly expand in the absence of regular, heightened cardio. With the rigors of single parenting and a job that has me up and moving at 4:30am, I just couldn't find a practical slot in my day that didn't totally wipe me out physically.

So…. I’m in my fourth week of running Monday--Friday on my LUNCH BREAK and I love it. I’m fortunate to work about a mile and a half from Miami Beach, so during my one-hour break I drive down, park, change in the car and hit the ocean sand. I can squeeze in a 3 or 4-miler, rinse off in the outdoor beach shower and head back to the office—all in under an hour. Added bonus: amazing scenery and usually a strong, northeasterly breeze.

The mental and physical changes have been immediate. I’m down 10 pounds but I feel a lot more energetic and alert too. Anyway, FWIW, it IS possible even with the most hectic of schedules.


"The things we enjoy are channels through which the divine glory strikes us, and those who love and delight in any good thing may yet learn to love God." --Gilbert Meilaender

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So…. I’m in my fourth week of running Monday--Friday on my LUNCH BREAK and I love it. I’m fortunate to work about a mile and a half from Miami Beach, so during my one-hour break I drive down, park, change in the car and hit the ocean sand. I can squeeze in a 3 or 4-miler, rinse off in the outdoor beach shower and head back to the office—all in under an hour. Added bonus: amazing scenery and usually a strong, northeasterly breeze.

That's impressive, Greg.

About the whole "workout during lunch" thing: You say you can shower and head back to the office. The trouble with my workouts is that I continue to sweat for a long time after stopping the workout, even after showering. I'd feel gross if I had to head straight back to work. I'd probably also look sweaty (and might be smelly).

I admire people who can pull off what you're doing. I wish I weren't such a "sweathog."


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
About the whole "workout during lunch" thing: You say you can shower and head back to the office. The trouble with my workouts is that I continue to sweat for a long time after stopping the workout, even after showering. I'd feel gross if I had to head straight back to work. I'd probably also look sweaty (and might be smelly).

I'm typing this at my desk, after a 4-miler (I've been back for about 15 minutes now), in a black polo shirt that is almost completely soaked! Yes indeed, this is a problem! I usually sweat for about 30-45 minutes afterward too.

My day typically ends at 2pm, so I only work in this post-run condition for about 90mins. Not that that's any real consolation. I've taken some steps to help minimize this:

1) I try and stand under the beach shower for a good couple minutes. This brings my body temp down substantially

2) i drive back to the office half naked

3) I put my shirt on only as I near the office parking lot

4) I have a cleaning period in my office behind closed doors for a few minutes when I get back. I have some scented body wipes (this week it's Ponds lavender-scented) which i use to thoroughly scrub down with. Then some deoderant, cologne and a brief trip to the bathroom.to make sure I'm presentable.

5) Then a cup of cold water

6) Preventative measure: I also keep my hair buzzed pretty short, so no combing or styling necessary upon return.

I have tried to master the art of avoidance by bolting to my office when I return and emerging in the most nonchalant fashion possible. Of course today, because the temps were in the upper 80's with like 90% humidity, this little routine was not entirely effective. I may look a little spent, but at least I smell decent. I think wink.png Hopefully dark clothing hides a multitude of sins!

Edited by Greg P

"The things we enjoy are channels through which the divine glory strikes us, and those who love and delight in any good thing may yet learn to love God." --Gilbert Meilaender

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> I wish I weren't such a "sweathog."

There's a shower in the men's room near my office, but I've never considered running at lunch because, um, no one around here wants me running at lunch. No one.

I wish I could, though, because with our girls' current sleep schedules, my first opportunity to get on the treadmill comes around 10pm, and by then I'm useless. I wish I were a morning person, but I've tried getting up early to exercise and it just isn't an option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a big-time sweater as well, and as Greg says perhaps the best thing is to wear dark clothes. I also wear the Underarmour underwear that doesn't hang on to moisture. Otherwise, you'd be surprised what a few minutes in the men's room (luckily I've got a unisex one which has a lock on the outer door) can do for hair and face.


That's just how eye roll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been running again, training for the 5K I ran a couple of years ago. I just went to sign up for the 5K and discovered that it'll cost me $24.50. In the past, the race has cost less, but it's a preschool fundraiser and I think it may have been less costly because our four kids were enrolled in that school over several years.

 

My question is: What do you guys pay to run in your 5Ks? Is $24.50 in the ballpark? This is a fundraiser, and I'm not opposed to paying $24.50. I'm just a little surprised, having paid something closer to $10 in the past for the same race.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My question is: What do you guys pay to run in your 5Ks? Is $24.50 in the ballpark? This is a fundraiser, and I'm not opposed to paying $24.50. I'm just a little surprised, having paid something closer to $10 in the past for the same race.

 

I thought that seemed a little steep...but then I started poking around some of the 5Ks in the Pittsburgh area, and $25 seems like the (high) average. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't run since early this year, after being diagnosed with a second stress fracture. I've done some morning walks. I'd like to get back to running.

An update: After taking 2012 off, I ran again in 2013, with the same goals as 2011: a 5K in the fall and the Fairfax Four Miler on New Year's Eve. I completed the 5K in September and, after a very iffy training "regimen" the past two months, have just completed the Fairfax Four Miler. Going into it, I honestly thought the odds were against me finishing. My recent morning runs have been, in a word, bombs. Yesterday I flamed out after 1 mile! That's some preparation for the Four Miler.

 

The forced slowness of the first mile tonight was a blessing. Sure, my time was lousy -- somewhere around 43:30 (official times have not yet been posted), but I know part of my problem during my morning run continues to be (after addressing this problem in the first week I started running a couple of years ago!) that I run too fast. My times even then aren't great, so I always convince myself that I'm "going slow." I'm not. Tonight I went slow, at least for that first mile. But had I not, I'm not sure I would've completed the run.

 

I feel ... great! Barring any stress fractures -- and I have no signs of any -- I'm going to press on and aim for a 10K in 2014. 

 

A training question for you 40-somethings: Is a 10K in the spring too aggressive a goal? Should I shoot for the summer or fall instead? I don't want to push things; my running goals have been very modest, I think you'll agree. But this is uncharted territory for me, and I don't have a running community to ask about these concerns.

 

EDIT: My time was 42:40, or 10:40/mile. Like I said, not great, but I refuse to let the fact that I placed 865th out of 1,325 racers get me down. :)

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EDIT: My time was 42:40, or 10:40/mile. Like I said, not great, but I refuse to let the fact that I placed 865th out of 1,325 racers get me down. smile.png

It's not terrible at all, Christian. Re: strategy-- i think it's always good to relax and hold back a little at the beginning of any race-- at least enough to get into a groove-- but after the first mile you should use whatever energy you have. in the moment you have it. If that makes any sense. This applies mostly to distance runs but i think it works in any competitive run. There's a tendency (at least with me in past events) to feel a burst in the middle of a race and then judiciously try and "save" it for when the tank gets low at some other point. This doesn't work. If you feel a burst, exploit it and spend the energy immediately, because it usually has a very brief shelf life. If you spend it, chances are good that more will come down the road.

 

A training question for you 40-somethings: Is a 10K in the spring too aggressive a goal?

 

Absolutely not. In fact, you should aim for a half marathon in the spring! A half is TOTALLY do-able. If you seriously push yourself in just one run every week-- either with pace or distance-- you should be ready to roll. An extra mile, one day a week, OR short sprints in a longer run, can help you gain a LOT of ground stamina-wise.  

 

My 2013 running was spotty. Nothing to brag about. Started at the end of April, continued thru the beginning of July and then petered out, then picked back up in October thru the beginning of December. My goal all along was to be ready to do a half marathon in February. At this stage, it's not looking good for me to run it; i'm just so sluggish now. But it's not totally out of the question. If I can run a respectable ten-miler in training by the last week of January, I'm just going to go for it. 

 

Re: Stress Fractures-- I'm still concerned about it too Christian. I had two stress fractures in 2010 from running, and the last one happened while I was in the best shape of my life. I know some have a tendency to blame shoes, but have you had anyone give you advice on your gait? I think this was the key to my stress fractures-- I have some very lazy habits when I get tired... One, is to run on the outside of my foot-- which is a sure-fire way to wreak havoc on that tiny little fibula. 

Edited by Greg P

"The things we enjoy are channels through which the divine glory strikes us, and those who love and delight in any good thing may yet learn to love God." --Gilbert Meilaender

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

EDIT: My time was 42:40, or 10:40/mile. Like I said, not great, but I refuse to let the fact that I placed 865th out of 1,325 racers get me down. smile.png

It's not terrible at all, Christian. Re: strategy-- i think it's always good to relax and hold back a little at the beginning of any race-- at least enough to get into a groove-- but after the first mile you should use whatever energy you have. in the moment you have it. If that makes any sense. This applies mostly to distance runs but i think it works in any competitive run. There's a tendency (at least with me in past events) to feel a burst in the middle of a race and then judiciously try and "save" it for when the tank gets low at some other point. This doesn't work. If you feel a burst, exploit it and spend the energy immediately, because it usually has a very brief shelf life. If you spend it, chances are good that more will come down the road.

 

A training question for you 40-somethings: Is a 10K in the spring too aggressive a goal?

 

Absolutely not. In fact, you should aim for a half marathon in the spring! A half is TOTALLY do-able. 

!!!!

A half marathon is the ultimate goal for me, Greg, although I haven't publicly said that until this moment. It seems ... unimaginable, and I'm in no rush to get there. But I also don't want to slack off. I've read advice to set another running goal as soon as you accomplish one -- if not sooner. Right now, first things first with a 10K. But I'll aim for sooner rather than later. Thanks for the encouragement!


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...