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The Passion of the Christ

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On Wednesday, February 25th, The Passion of the Christ opens and the world finally gets to decide for themselves regarding the Burning Question...

ARE ALL OF JESUS DISCIPLES REALLY PLAYED BY JOHN RHYS-DAVIES?

Your responses, reviews, gripes, and raves are welcome here.

But be aware, there are about 40 pages of discussion that have already happened, previous to the film's release. They include the responses of several of us who saw the film early. And they are located...

here.

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Darrel Manson wrote:

: A question for those who have seen both the rough and final cuts: how

: different are they?

Depends which rough cut you have in mind. The final cut is more or less identical to the rough cut I saw in mid-January, though the special effects are more enhanced, Caviezel's eyes are now a strange shade of crystal-clear brown, the Isaiah quote has been moved from 400 BC to 700 BC (lest Mel appear too liberal, I guess), and the blood curse has been removed from the subtitles even though those who know Aramaic can still hear it being said.

Apparently the flashback to the Sermon on the Mount (in which Jesus tells his hearers to forgive their enemies), which was in both versions of the film that I saw, was NOT in the rough cut shown to conservative pundits and church types throughout most of last year -- it was added to the film in re-shoots towards the end of the year, reportedly because Mel Gibson wanted to emphasize that he forgives all the people who have been attacking him and his movie, or something like that. I wonder what else might have been added to the film in the last few months.

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Clint M   

Well, the post-hype has begun.

PLANO, Texas - Even before sunrise, believers and nonbelievers alike poured into movie theaters around the nation on Ash Wednesday for the opening of Mel Gibson (news)'s \"The Passion of the Christ.\"  

An estimated 6,000 people filled all 20 auditoriums at a Cinemark theater in this Dallas suburb to watch the film. All the tickets had been bought and donated by a local churchgoer.  

\"I hope everybody sees it with an open mind,\" said Rick Pierce, 53, a Baptist who sipped coffee and chewed on a breakfast burrito at the theater before the first showing.  

Elsewhere across the nation, some couldn't wait for morning screenings. More than 100 people watched the midnight showing of \"The Passion\" at the ArcLight Cinemas in Los Angeles.  

\"I'm in shock. I'm physically weak. I'm emotional,\" said Joseph Camerieri, a 39-year-old paralegal student from Los Angeles who was trying to hold back tears after seeing the film.  

\"I think if you're a Christian it will increase your faith tenfold in what Christ has done for you. If you're not a Christian, you'll probably treat others with more love.\"  

In the central Pennsylvania community of Bellefonte, about 50 people attended a showing after midnight. Viewers groaned as Jesus was nailed to the cross, and muffled cries could be heard during more than an hour of Jesus' torture, crucifixion and death. In the end, as Jesus rises from the grave, some in the audience quietly celebrated.  

\"To me, that was the important part,\" said Aaron Tucker, an English major at Penn State. \"I'm like, 'Oh, victory!' There's more to this movie than just the violence. It's about triumph.\"

And to add - one of the local multiplexes where I live (as of 11:00 AM) has had all night screenings - 12:01AM, 2:40AM, 5:10AM, 7:40AM, and 10:10AM. The 12:00PM showing is sold out, as are the 6:30 and 7:00 PM showings (although I know that a church rented out one of those showings).

I wonder if this might break Matrix:Reloaded record for biggest Wednesday/R-Rated opening record... but that's the business side of me talking. :wink:

EDIT: I was bored, so I checked out the rest of the week. The two prime evening showings (6:30 and 7:00 PM) are sold out until Monday evening. The last time I saw that much business at that particular multiplex, it was when I was working there and X-Files: The Movie was on.

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EDIT: I was bored, so I checked out the rest of the week.  The two prime evening showings (6:30 and 7:00 PM) are sold out until Monday evening.  The last time I saw that much business at that particular multiplex, it was when I was working there and X-Files: The Movie was on.

Heh, heh. This reminds me of the early release of The Godfather from before the advent of the multiplex (well into the run, I went to see it while my parents were out of town. Waited 45 minutes out in winter cold at a place with one screen that subsequently grew to two, then 12).

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DGibFen wrote:

: The last time I saw that much business at that particular multiplex, it was

: when I was working there and X-Files: The Movie was on.

Ah, but that points up an interesting question I've had for a while now. For months, Christians have been saying that we all have to make sure we see this film on the opening weekend, in order to prove our demographic clout with Hollywood -- it is the opening weekend that determines a movie's future, or so the story goes. There is some truth to that, but what nobody mentions is that films with a built-in "cult following", such as horror films and Star Trek films and, yes, the X-Files film, always tend to open huge and then sink very fast; as I recall, X-Files: The Movie and Star Trek: First Contact are among the very, very few films that had opening weekends of over $30 million but failed to cross the $100 million line when all was said and done.

Quick fact-check: Yes, according to BoxOfficeMojo.com, 117 films have had opening-weekend box-office takes of over $30 million, and of those, 13 sputtered out before they got a chance to cross that mythical $100-million line:

1.
Red Dragon
, prequel to
Silence of the Lambs
, open $36.5mil, total $93.1mil

2.
Freddy Vs. Jason
, sequel to all the
Friday the 13th
and Nightmare on Elm Street movies, open $36.4mil, total $82.6mil

3.
The Scorpion King
, prequel to
The Mummy Returns
, open $36.1mil, total $91mil

4.
Scream 3
, sequel to
Scream
, open $34.7mil, total $89.1mil

5.
The Haunting
, remake of
The Haunting
, open $33.4mil, total $91.4mil

6.
Blade II
, sequel to
Blade
, open $32.5mil, total $82.3mil

7.
Pokemon: The First Movie
, franchise spin-off, open $31mil, total $85.7mil

8.
Star Trek: First Contact
, eighth film in the series, open $30.7mil, total $92mil

9.
Bram Stoker's Dracula
, remake of various Dracula movies, open $30.5mil, total $82.5mil

10.
Unbreakable
, follow-up to
The Sixth Sense
, open $30.3mil, total $95mil

11.
America's Sweethearts
, doesn't fit the pattern, open $30.2mil, total $93.6mil

12.
The X-Files: Fight the Future
, franchise spin-off, open $30.1mil, total $83.9mil

13.
Panic Room
, doesn't fit the pattern, open $30.1mil, total $96.4mil

So even IF The Passion of the Christ makes $30 million in its first weekend, as some pundits predict, that doesn't mean the film will mean anything more to Hollywood than any other horror movie with a built-in "cult following". For THIS particular film, it's not the first weekend that counts, but the weekends AFTER that.

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Ooh yes, Peter. What should also be in the mix is the report of 4000 screens at opening. That ought to skew things a bit too.

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Say, along those box-office lines, have you all picked up on the latest theme in "Passion" criticism from Andy Rooney, et. al. -- that, after months of implications that the movie would be commerical suicide, Gibson might actually make money on this movie? Gasp! How dare he, being a suffering artist and all...

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The last time I saw that much business at that particular multiplex, it was when I was working there and X-Files: The Movie was on.

Old: The Truth is Out There

New: The Truth is In Here

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Here's a link to something I posted last night... not the review, but the letter to Christians regarding the way we respond to the film's arrival.

It was written hastily, so it's not my best work, but it's something that's been building in my heart for a while as I've watched evangelical "Passion" commercials.

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Oh, here's a VERY interesting response to my box-office post, from a guy I know in another forum:

- - -

> For *this* particular film, it's not

> the first weekend that counts, but the weekends *after* that.

Especially when you consider that many theaters have been reporting advance sell-outs for all showings for the entire weekend. If this is due to church groups buying large blocks of tickets (for whatever reason), then we have an interesting situation, in two ways.

1) If large blocks of tickets were bought and many go unused, theaters are going to look at half-empty sold-out screening rooms and wonder what's wrong. Sure, they got their ticket money, but most of the ticket money goes back to the studio and the distributor; the actual theater gets very little of it. The theaters make their money on concessions, and if tickets are sold that don't get used, that's fewer people in the theater buying popcorn and soda. (Despite reports from several corners indicating that this is not a "popcorn" movie, there are many people who simply don't go to a movie without having popcorn. If the popcorn goes uneaten, well, the theater still got the money from you. And I, for one, never watch a movie without getting something to drink (usually bottled water).) Which means less money for the theater. This might lead some theaters to place caps on how many advance tickets can be purchased at once (excepting renting out an entire screen, which is a different issue altogether).

2) I've heard from many people who didn't try to buy advance tickets until they started hearing that shows were selling out, and when they did try to buy tickets, they found that they couldn't get any. What percentage of those people who've been turned away the first time are likely to go back and try again? (Set aside emotional issues about how "compelling" and "important" this film is, and put yourself in the place of the average filmgoer.) Unless the word-of-mouth is substantially better than the reviews, the initial buying rush may actually result in fewer people overall seeing the movie than would have normally.

Neither of these things reflects well on the groups who have been beating the drums for this movie. Add into that the lukewarm reviews (I haven't seen any real pans, but I've seen precious few that are all praise; most are taking the middle ground, and virtually every review out there makes a point of warning the reader of how brutal and graphically violent this film is), and this film may join several previous attempts at filming the Gospels in the footnotes of film history.

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John   

PLANO, Texas - Even before sunrise, believers and nonbelievers alike poured into movie theaters around the nation on Ash Wednesday for the opening of Mel Gibson (news)'s \"The Passion of the Christ.\"  

An estimated 6,000 people filled all 20 auditoriums at a Cinemark theater in this Dallas suburb to watch the film. All the tickets had been bought and donated by a local churchgoer.

Ok, so I live here in Dallas, and acquired some of these free tickets to see the film this morning. I have some thoughts on the film itself, which I'll share later, but I thought I'd like to share the experience of being at this particular location.

In a word, overkill. When we arrived at around 8AM for our 9AM screening, the parking lot was entirely full, and this being in an out of the way place, I ended up walking about 1/2 from where I parked to the theater. Inside the theater were loads of television people, cameras, lights, etc. There were also tables set up all over the lobby, with seemingly every area Christian organization handing out paraphernalia. The packed and we had to basically push our way to find the line for our showing. We found ourselves in line with what appeared to be an entire Christian high school, and we were behind them, so I assumed it was front row for me!

Once inside, people were passing out some kind of card, which I didn't receive (on purpose, I really didn't care, I just wanted to see the film). Come to find out, it was some sort of decision card, and now comes the bad part. At the conclusion of the film, the music soars into the credits and...they promptly turn off the sound and some guy gets up in front of the theater, says he's speechless about what he's just seen, and proceeds to go into a full-fledged gospel presentation. I was stunned. I couldn't get out of there quickly enough, and had to turn down pamphlets and books being handed to me on my way out.

To sum up, it was a circus. I felt it at best was excessive, and I'm sure it colored my experience of the film somewhat. I'm going to mull on th emovie itself for a while, giving myself a little time to recover. Right now I'm frustrated about the experience, about people not allowing this work of art to speak for itself, about them trying to hijack the moment to make sure we get the message out and get people to fill out a card. And on top of that, all of this to a group that assuredly was almost entirely professing Christians? This makes no sense.

There it is, FWIW.

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John   

Oh and Jeffrey, I just read your letter and couldn't agree more. A number of thoughts you include are expressions of how I'm feeling in the wake of this experience this morning. Good stuff as usual.

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Ok, so I live here in Dallas, and acquired some of these free tickets to see the film this morning. I have some thoughts on the film itself, which I'll share later, but I thought I'd like to share the experience of being at this particular location.

In a word, overkill.  

<clip>

At the conclusion of the film, the music soars into the credits and...they promptly turn off the sound and some guy gets up in front of the theater, says he's speechless about what he's just seen, and proceeds to go into a full-fledged gospel presentation. I was stunned. I couldn't get out of there quickly enough, and had to turn down pamphlets and books being handed to me on my way out.

To sum up, it was a circus.

TANSTAAFL

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At the conclusion of the film, the music soars into the credits and...they promptly turn off the sound and some guy gets up in front of the theater, says he's speechless about what he's just seen, and proceeds to go into a full-fledged gospel presentation. I was stunned. I couldn't get out of there quickly enough, and had to turn down pamphlets and books being handed to me on my way out.

NOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:madani: :madani: :madani: :madani:

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Here's a link to something I posted last night... not the review

Thank you for clarifying some of my thoughts Jefferey. Interestingly, the pastor saying, "Go see this R-rated movie" during Gibson's Diane Sawyer interview was none other than J. Don George of Dallas, TX. Both my in-laws are on staff at his church. His policy before this movie was that any staff member seeing an R-rated movie was to be fired. This one, however, is "R for reality" and he encouraged the staff to see it multiple times.

I'd like to ask him if he thinks that this R-rated movie was the ONLY one worthy of a Christian's time, money, and reflection. "This violence was for a purpose" is the response I get from others when I ask.

My father-in-law doesn't even have a particular desire to see the movie himself, but feels some compulsion to do so as a staff member. I wonder if this same type of "peer pressure" is felt in other Christian communities as well. You aren't SAVED until you've SEEN the wounds in his hands and HEARD the shouts of the Romans. :roll:

On a side note: I'm working in Nashville at the moment and they are showing it at the Opryland IMAX tonight, of which I have a ticket. smile.gif

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I feel your pain, Jeffrey -- these guys are doing EXACTLY what the Campus Crusade people here in Canada said NOT to do -- but is there any chance you could trim a few vowels from your cry of horror, so as to avoid stretching the page wider than some monitors can bear?

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SDG   

At the conclusion of the film, the music soars into the credits and...they promptly turn off the sound and some guy gets up in front of the theater, says he's speechless about what he's just seen, and proceeds to go into a full-fledged gospel presentation. I was stunned. I couldn't get out of there quickly enough, and had to turn down pamphlets and books being handed to me on my way out.

I had a similar experience at my rough-cut screening three-odd weeks ago. It was held at a New Life Christian Fellowship, and we had to sit (or rather stand) through a good half-hour of bouncy praise music before they even started the film, and the final image had barely flickered off the screen when the praise team was up there again, this time with the hushed tones and sustained chords and cymbal rolls.

The funny thing was, ten seconds later the lobby was full of individuals in roman collars and wimples -- and I know because I was there too. The Catholics all exited en masse, while our Evangelical hosts, presumably, stayed in their seats lamenting the hardness of our hearts, wondering how we could sit through that powerful experience of the gospel and not want to respond to an altar call.

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...

......

Sigh.

What can you do, y'know?

On the one hand--I'm Christian. I understand. Iron is hot, harvest plenty, workers are few. Some might go home and get in a car accident and die so now is the time. Some have needed this to finally crack the hardness of their heart and have no idea what to do with the information they're trying to interpret, so let them know: we're available.

On the other--

Go away. Go away and let me absorb what I've seen. Go away from me, stop soiling my experience with your presupposition that I need you to interpret what is happening in my heart right now. Get away from me and cease with your insulting propaganda, your bandwagon-driving numbers-racket that capitalizes on my vulnerability. Don't tell me you're speechless when you've obviously intended to do this all along. Don't lie to me and deny that you haven't planned this moment with the elders and board members and clapped yourselves on the back that This Is A Prime Opportunity To Bring Them To Jesus. I wanted to listen to how it spoke to me--and all I hear is you.

My God...if a group wants to encourage the Gospel, why don't they just pay to throw up a slide after the credits end? It could be so much more effective...and so simple...leave them with a question or something that puts the ball in their court without digging into the soft tissues with a powder actuated hammer...

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Imagine the plight of the poor soul who is not ready, who is sitting in the middle of a crowd surrounded by fervent believers, who is ready to leave when the movie is over, and then finds himself confronted by a "presentation." How humiliated will he be if he gets up to leave? How cornered and frustrated will he feel when he is surprised by this ambush?

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Man...I'm really angry right now.

Ok...must breathe. That has been going on for decades.

The well-meaning demeaning deeper meaning with no meaning at all.

It's just so darn frustrating.

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Jeffrey Wells turns in a very interesting response:

I've seen THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST, finally, and TIME's Richard Corliss was right on the money when he called it BLOODHEART. The vino really flows in this thing...oh, how it flows. And chunks of flesh fly. And fiendishly sadistic Roman soldiers are shown getting off at the sufferings of their victim, who is known to a couple of them only as \"the Gallilean.\" He is lashed and lashed again...beaten, kicked, spat upon. Over and over and over.  

This is the most violent film I've ever sat through, and I'm not just saying this because of the realistically graphic gore, or the evangelist ardor with which Mel Gibson -- who directed, co-wrote and self-financed this $30 million art film -- throws it in our face.  

Just after the Monday afternoon screening I walked into a coffee joint on Washington Blvd. and said hello to a big-time producer and former studio chief. I told him I'd just seen the Gibson film and he asked me what I thought. I said it's a handsome, first-rate piece of work but that it's also \"obsessive in its bloodiness, to such an extent that I think there's something 'off' about Gibson.\"  

\"You're not the first person to say that,\" he replied.  

I'm not calling Gibson's vision into question. I know he feels he's delivered a serious work about the spiritual meaning of the end of the life of Jesus Christ, but trust me -- this is first and foremost a film about blood and sadism.  

In a time machine, the middle and end portions of this film would be just what those British physicians would have ideally forced Malcolm McDowell's Alex to watch in Stanley Kubrick's A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, as part of their Ludovico technique screening sessions.  

Corliss says in his review that in the film's most prolonged beating sequence, Jesus (who is called \"Yeshua\" in the film, in accordance with Gibson's adherence to the Aramaic and ancient Latin tongues spoken in Judea during Christ's era, and who is touchingly played by Jim Caviezel, as far as Gibson's scheme allows) is subjected to \"80 or so wince-worthy lashes.\" Wrong -- try 103.  

By my arithmetic, Caveizel is walloped about 179 times in this film, and I'm being a tad conservative. I counted as carefully as I could, judging by the sounds of lashings and punchings as well as visual depictions.  

He is punched or kicked at least 27 times at the hand of Jewish goons before being taken in front of Pontius Pilate. Then, at Pilate's order, the Roman goons tie Yeshua to a stone post and wail like beasts with whips and a cat o' nine tails with jagged metal tips, causing bits of flesh to be separated from his body with each blow, about 103 times. Then he's hit another 4 or 5 times during his recovery period, and then whipped and punched 54 times as he tries to carry his cross through the streets of Jerusalem towards Golgotha. His face is spat into 3 or 4 times.  

Corliss also says that during this final journey Caveizel's Christ \"falls three times, which is fine for Catholic fidelity but wasteful and redundant as movie drama.\" He actually falls down six times. And of course he's nailed to the cross, and right after this is flipped over face-down as the cross is turned over so the protruding nails can be hammered flat. Then he' s hung on the upright cross until dead, naturally, and then is stabbed with a long spear in the right side of his abdomen, which results in a geyser of blood and water annointing the Roman solider with the lance.  

Did Christ's day of execution actually happen this horrifically? For the most part, yeah, probably... although the relentless beatings by the Jewish mob seem excessive, and the ones administered on the way to Golgotha seem completely nonsensical and...well, Mel-driven.  

But you know what? I don't care. I don't need or want a blood-bath like this in my life, or in my head. I don't care what Gibson had in mind, or how much in awe he claims to be of Christ's example or teachings. There's \"art\" a'plenty in this thing, but not enough grace. Whatever he was after, something got hold of Gibson and turned his film down the wrong alley.  

Technically and in several respects artistically, this is a first-rate thing. Call it a richly rendered, handsomely composed (by d.p. Caleb Deschanel) piece of cinematic impressionism. It's also clearly a personal statement by a guy who's opened his heart and sincerely put his spiritual feelings on the line.  

But there's something weird about it too.  

I'm using the words \"weird\" and \"repellent\" regarding the indicated reasons for the various beatings. I'm speaking not only of the motivations that lead the Jewish high priests, Pontius Pilate, and their minions to brutalize, torture and finally kill Yeshua, but the psychological snakes in Gibson's head that caused him to so flagrantly emphasize the shredding of a human body.  

What's going on here?  

It's not exactly a diamond-bullet-through-the-forehead realization to say it's Gibson who is being flayed and tortured and tested before God. He seems to view life as some kind of trial or gauntlet. There's always more dramatic juice in the agony instead of the ecstasy, but Gibson seems to relish it.  

I can't think of any major actor since Marlon Brando who's had the crap beaten out of him in more films, or been more misunderstood or castigated by the powers-that-be. The most Christ-like tortures were visited upon Gibson's William Wallace in the Oscar-winning BRAVEHEART, but don't forget the savage beatings in the LETHAL WEAPON flicks (that indoor torture scene when he's hanging by a chain with his hands tied behind him, and being electrocuted?), MAD MAX, PAYBACK. And the accusations of pedophilia thrown at his character by a small-town community in MAN WITHOUT A FACE. And the spiritual crisis his ex-minister suffers through in SIGNS.  

Is there a meaning ascribed to his Jesus story? Of course there is. I got it and so will you. We're no better in our sinning and selfishness than Christ's tormentors are in this film, Gibson is saying. We have it in us to be just as fiendish and sadistic as any Roman whip-lasher, he's saying. But there was and is good -- a purifying, cleansing, universal spirit -- in Yeshua. And if you let it -- him -- into your heart, you can put your bad stuff behind you.  

Or, you know, words to that effect.  

But the emphasis on brutality is so overwhelming in THE PASSION, and you can't just explain this away by saying, oh, well, this is how it was...those Roman soldiers sure were sadistic f****s when they wanted to be, and man, those bad-news Jews...they sure wanted Jesus dead, didn't they?  

Is THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST anti-Semitic? It didn't strike me as being especially so, but I can see the point of those who are claiming it is. Put it this way: if you're anti-Semitic going in, the film won't be a deeply uncomfortable experience.  

I've read all my life that Jerusalem's religious authority council, lead by the High Priest Caiaphas (Mattia Sbragia), wanted Jesus dead because he was seen as a challenge to their power and a usurper of their traditions. As I noted last year, Phillip Saville's THE GOSPEL OF JOHN, taken straight from the Bible, went with this version of the story when it was released last November, and no one squawked.  

Gibson's film goes with John's version as well, and we've got squawking galore. I'm not saying the complainers are 100% correct, but they're not totally crazy either.  

A colleague has argued that while Gibson's film has us share in the anguish of a couple of guilt-ridden, less-than-beastly Romans who are feeling badly about what they've done to Christ, it doesn't dramatize or acquaint us with any nice street-level Jews who don't want Jesus's blood.  

No Jewish sympathizers, that is, except for (a) two rabbis who complain early on that Jesus is being railroaded, (cool.gif Simon of Cyrene (Jarreth Merz) who carries Jesus's cross and at one point yells at the Romans to stop beating him or else, but who seems to be more black than Hebrew, © Christ's disciples (Peter and another younger guy...forget his name), and (d) Jesus's mother Mary (Maia Morgenstern), and (e) soulmate and supporter Mary Magdelene (Monica Belluci).  

You can argue, of course, that everyone except the two rabbis and Simon are Jesus's \"family,\" which makes their kindnesses seem a bit less exceptional.  

I see the Caiaphas gang as diseased repressive nutters in the same vein as Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson....that's all. They don't represent the Jewish people any more than religious righties represent Average Joe's or blue-state values, so in this sense I don't see the blanket-condemnation-of-Jews thing at all.  

For me, the most spiritually affirming and tender-hearted Jesus movie is still Martin Scorsese's THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST ('88)...and please rent the Criterion DVD if you've never seen this amazing film, which has gotten better for me with each successive viewing. (The ending is pure ecstasy.)  

Also very soulful, as well as the most political and austere, is Pier Paolo Pasolini's THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW ('64).  

And Nicholas Ray's KING OF KINGS (1961) with Jeffrey Hunter has its affecting moments (especially in the final third), and has the most beautiful musical score, composed by the great Miklos Rozsa.  

How will Gibson's film compare? While it has the fiercest and most singular vision of all, and is the most absorbingly spoken and photographed, it'll probably be regarded down the road as the strangest and darkest entry, as well as the least absorbing. The blood of Christ made everything right at the finale of BEN-HUR, but not this time.  

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Okay, I just received permission to go ahead and post my review even though it will be included as part of Film Forum tomorrow at CT.

Here ya go.

- - - -

The words

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Titles, Alan, give us some titles! It's certainly the most violent film I've ever seen! Insofar as more screen time is given to violent acts, and more attention given to make sure the violence is convincingly real...

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Red Dawn?

I know, I know. But yeah, I agree--I think it's about the intent and 'staging' as well. Reservoir Dogs made me nauseated from the violence--and the worst part was the stuff that we didn't see directly. Natural Born Killers was pretty darn violent, as was Se7en, as was Bloodsport, as was Urotsukodoji and Hellbound: Hellraiser II and A Clockwork Orange. All of these had incredibly graphic depictions vastly differing in style and content and intent. Many of these (save the anime) were quite realistic, and unrelenting.

One difference is this is visited upon a man who does not fight back and who does not so much protest as endure...

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