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Ron Reed

The Road

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For what it's worth, Steve, there are scenes in the trailer that aren't in the movie. But you're making a perfectly reasonable decision to avoid the movie. The book really does cast an incredible spell, and the movie doesn't enhance it or equal it. I'm still impressed with the film, but no, if you've read the book there's no compelling argument to see the film as well.

Oh, and by the way, it's great to see you on A&F!

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I'm double-posting this McCarthy interview link, which I've posted in the Road film-discussion thread, because it applies as much, maybe more, to the book of The Road, and to the writing process, as it does to the film and filmmaking.

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I'm double-posting this McCarthy interview link, which I've posted in the Road film-discussion thread, because it applies as much, maybe more, to the book of The Road, and to the writing process, as it does to the film and filmmaking.

Incredible interview. Thanks so much for linking that.

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I'm rereading The Road for one of my grad classes, and I just came to this sentence near the end of the book: "The salitter drying from the earth." Since I'm still trying to be a dutiful student, I looked up salitter, only to discover it doesn't exist on dictionary.com; when I Googled it, though, I found this blog post that explained it:

Salitter seems only to have occurred, used in this way, in the writings of Jakob Boehme, a 17th century German Christian mystic. Here is enough of what he says about it, to begin to understand the exquisite choice made by McCarthy in using the word:“What is in Paradise is made of the celestial Salitter..[it] is clear, resplendent..The forces of the celestial Salitter give rise to celestial fruits flowers, and vegetation.” (1.)

Salitter, as used by Boehme, as used by McCarthy, is the essence of God. It is the essence of God which is “drying from the earth” in this apocalyptic novel. It is the end of the Earth for humanity, and also the abandonment of the Earth by what had been divine.

Sometimes, you just have to love the internet.

[edit] While I was reading, I just saw a commercial for Snuggies that used the "Macarena" song. The inescapable conclusion is that this will cause the end of the world.

Edited by Tyler

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Wow.

Today, you're my hero, Tyler.

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Josh MacIvor-Andersen at Ruminate Magazine:

... These days, the collective imagination seems to center on the myth of endings. We are all zombies and empty streets and makeshift crossbows. God, it seems, has hightailed it into the cosmos.

The Road was a natural fit. In it we see perhaps the final evolution of the monster. From Beowulf, where grotesque, non-human “others” are off hording gold or terrorizing the mead-hall, to Frankenstein, where the monster emerges from human invention and hubris, to The Road, where the monsters are simply us—no more bloated physique or toothy maws. Just desperate, hungry people at the bottom of a slippery ethical slope.

And we get a nice updating of the classic hero’s journey, too, where a character is asked on (or forced into) a quest where he or she must cross a threshold from the known to the unknown, battle and die and resurrect, only to return home with some kind of elixir ...

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