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Anyone heard the new Dylan set?


Josh Hurst
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I'm curious to hear Bob Dylan's new live material, Rolling Thunder Revue: Live 1975, but with two CDs and a DVD in the set, I'm sure it's fairly pricey. Has anyone here heard it? Care to offer up a quick review? I'm a huge Dylan fan, but not a Dylan completist, and I can live without a live album if it isn't too interesting.

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I am not an expert on that chatper of Dylan's career. However, I greatly enjoy this set. Great and surprising arrangements of some of his best songs. The performance of "Hurricane" (not one of his better known songs) is quite intense. And it's great to know that's T-Bone Burnett backing him up on guitar.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

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Rolling Stone's review of the soundtrack is up:

Masked and Anonymous - starring Bob Dylan and directed by Larry Charles -- is either a rambling art-house flick or a spectacular conceptual satire of Dylan's personal mythology. But even if neither of those options sounds good to you, you still might like the soundtrack, a collection of Dylan covers alongside four new recordings by the man himself. There's an unhinged Italian rap version of "Like a Rolling Stone," by Articolo 31, and an engrossing "My Back Pages" sung in Japanese by the Magokoro Brothers.

For all their charm, these covers are more or less tricked-out background

music, designed to show the Dylan character's global reach. Other moments on Masked's soundtrack strive for something more transcendent and touch on Dylan's true appeal: his suggestion that there's another way to approach the big metaphysical questions. All of the material Dylan recorded for the project (a corn-free "Dixie," a bitter "Down in the Flood," a roaring new arrangement of "Cold Irons Bound" and a sprightly bluegrass take on "Diamond Joe") has this effect, as does Shirley Caesar's severe "Gotta Serve Somebody" and the Dixie Hummingbirds' noble, forthright reading of "City of Gold," one of the most uncharacteristically utopian pages in the entire Dylan songbook.

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