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Peter T Chattaway

Captain America: The First Avenger

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Links to threads on the comic-book character and The Avengers (2012).

I am intrigued to hear that they are doing this film as a "period piece", set in the 1940s -- just as they are supposedly doing Thor as "a period fantasy in the vein of 'The Lord of the Rings.'" If they want both of these characters to hook up with Iron Man and The Incredible Hulk, how will they draw the connection between these period-piece origin films and the present-day cross-over film? Will the period-piece films end by zapping the characters forward in time? Or will the gap between the period-piece films and the present-day film be kept kind of vague, kind of like the gap between The Scorpion King (where the title character is a hero) and the prologue to The Mummy Returns (where the Scorpion King is now a villain)? Would there be the possibility of further period-piece films down the road, keeping in mind that the character must be kept alive and perhaps other conditions must be met in order for The Avengers to take place? Etc., etc.

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Captain America Film Will Be a Period Piece Plus McConaughey is Not Involved!

IESB's Robert Sanchez spoke with Marvel big wig Kevin Feige today about the new Avengers film they have planned starring Captain America! . . .

IESB asked Feige if the Captain America film would be a period piece. He confirmed yes, the story will take place during World War II, just like the comic book origin story. He says they plan to remain very faithful to the source material and completely traditional.

Feige also confirmed that it was definitely the Captain America shield that was seen in IRON MAN on Tony Stark's work-station as he's removing his suit for the first time. It's just an Easter Egg and probably won't have anything to do with the Capt. America story. . . .

IESB.net, May 21

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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Jeff   

After playing Hancock, it would be weird to see Smith playing another superhero. Being a former Smith fan who eventually realized that the man has limited range, I don't really feel too jazzed about this rumor. (I used to like I Robot but ended up selling it, along with a bunch of other DVDs, in order to afford a birthday present for my girl; times were tough that week :D ).

My choice for Captain America? Nathan Fillion!

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'Captain America' recruits director

Joe Johnston has inked a deal to direct "First Avenger: Captain America," Marvel Studios' take on its classic comic book character. Marvel's Kevin Feige is producing.

No writers are on board, but the studio, which is hearing pitches, expects to hire shortly. . . .

"This is a guy who designed the vehicles for 'Star Wars,' who storyboarded the convoy action sequence for 'Raiders of the Lost Ark,' " Feige said. "From 'Rocketeer' to 'October Sky' to 'The Wolfman,' you can look at pieces of his movies and see how they lead to this one." . . .

The character's last live-action appearance was in 1990's "Captain America," a cheap production from 21st Century Films that ended up going to straight to video. The movie starred Matt Salinger as the hero, dethawed in modern times to fight his archnemesis, the Red Skull. . . .

Hollywood Reporter, November 9

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I loved The Rocketeer. Joe Johnston caught the nostalgic feel of the era without making it irrelevant to our time. My hopes just took an uptick for this project.

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Markus, McFeely to write 'Captain'

Marvel Studios has engaged Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely to script "Captain America," a film that has Joe Johnston attached to direct. . . .

Markus and McFeely were co-writers of both "Chronicles of Narnia" films as well as the HBO telepic "The Life and Death of Peter Sellers."

Variety, November 18

'Captain America' enlists two scribes

Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely are in negotiations to pen Marvel Studios' "First Avenger: Captain America." The dealmaking occurs about a week after Joe Johnston boarded the project as director.

Hollywood Reporter, November 18

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Red Skull Confirmed as Captain America Villain

Johnston confirmed at the press conference that the Red Skull will indeed be the villain of the first movie and told Ryan later a bit more about why they decided to set the majority of the movie during WWII:

"Virtually the entire story except the bookends are in World War II because we all recognize we have one chance to tell the origin story of how he became Captain America, you can't tell a modern story and then go back and tell the origin story. If you're going to do it, let's do it. Let's do it first. Everyone wanted to tell an origin story. There was a version where it was a modern story and it didn't work."

ComingSoon.net, February 6

Captain America will be a USO performer in the movie, director says

It's one thing to take Batman off the comic-book page and make his costume still look good in a live-action feature, but Captain America presents a far bigger challenge — the hero is essentially a walking flag, which might leave many average moviegoers giggling instead of saluting.

But director Joe Johnston and the team at Marvel Studios have a plan for "The First Avenger: Captain America," which is due in Summer 2011: They've added a new wrinkle to the classic mythology to explain why a scientifically enhanced super-soldier would venture out in the WWII battlefields in a costume that leans a bit heavy on the old Betsy Ross imagery.

"The costume is a flag, but the way we're getting around that is we have Steve Rogers forced into the USO circuit. After he's made into this super-soldier, they decide they can't send him into combat and risk him getting killed. He's the only one and they can't make more. So they say, 'You're going to be in this USO show' and they give him a flag suit. He can't wait to get out of it." . . .

Los Angeles Times, February 6

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Evan Day   
"The costume is a flag, but the way we're getting around that is we have Steve Rogers forced into the USO circuit. After he's made into this super-soldier, they decide they can't send him into combat and risk him getting killed. He's the only one and they can't make more. So they say, 'You're going to be in this USO show' and they give him a flag suit. He can't wait to get out of it." . . .

Ugh, why do they need to be apologetic about it? Armies carried their flag at the front in times of war as inspiration. That's Cap's point, to inspire (as opposed to the Red Skull, who's point is to inspire fear in the enemies of the Axis Powers). And the Ultimate "Cap's" WWII suit looks fine to me.

4034999203_8d0cc7a418.jpg

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Evan Day wrote:

: Ugh, why do they need to be apologetic about it? Armies carried their flag at the front in times of war as inspiration.

See Flags of Our Fathers for an example of how (and why) some soldiers might resist being treated as symbols. But if you read the rest of the article that I linked to, you'll see that the basic "character arc" that Steve Rogers follows is one that isn't really all that "apologetic". Yes, the character initially resents being nothing more than an entertainer in a colourful suit; but by the end of the film, he comes to see that he can inspire people by accepting the role that the government has given him (or a role very much like it, at any rate).

Persiflage wrote:

: I know Will Smith was being considered.

I sincerely hope he WASN'T. Some roles are open to colour-blind casting. And some characters can be switched around, racially speaking, while staying true to what makes them work (cf. Nick Fury). But I don't think Captain America -- a nation-symbolizing hero created and promoted by the American government during World War II -- is one of those characters. It would stretch plausibility to the breaking point, especially at a time when filmmakers from Spike Lee to George Lucas have been drawing our attention to the marginalization of black troops during that era.

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Evan Day wrote:

: Ugh, why do they need to be apologetic about it? Armies carried their flag at the front in times of war as inspiration.

See Flags of Our Fathers for an example of how (and why) some soldiers might resist being treated as symbols. But if you read the rest of the article that I linked to, you'll see that the basic "character arc" that Steve Rogers follows is one that isn't really all that "apologetic". Yes, the character initially resents being nothing more than an entertainer in a colourful suit; but by the end of the film, he comes to see that he can inspire people by accepting the role that the government has given him (or a role very much like it, at any rate).

I don't know. They can tweak the story however they like to come around to the point, but I think I'm with Evan here. The original costume wasn't the bright red, white and blue he wears today anyway. Actually, most of the point is Steve Rodgers embraced the idea of becoming a symbol for his country. He was too ill to enlist, so he signed up for the super-soldier program.

In fact, although they took many liberties with Tim Roth's Abomination in The Incredible Hulk, I didn't mind at all since it set the stage to contrast 2 characters who received the serum both willingly - one for his own quest for power and one to be able to serve a greater good.*

Captain America is right up there with Spider-Man, maybe a hair's breadth in front, as my favorite superhero - despite my personal ambivalence toward patriotism, I respect this character immensely - so I'm going to be a little more picky about it's on-screen adaptation.

*This brings up a possible continuity question - the article quotes Johnston as saying, "He's the only one and they can't make more." - so how was the serum available to inject Roth's character with?

Edited by Darryl A. Armstrong

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[quote name='Darryl A. Armstrong' date='08 February 2010 - 11:51 PM'

*This brings up a possible continuity question - the article quotes Johnston as saying, "He's the only one and they can't make more." - so how was the serum available to inject Roth's character with?

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Woah! And now CHUD reports Cap will be joined by the Invaders:

Last summer I talked to Marvel Studio's Kevin Feige, and he told me that The Invaders would appear in Captain America. In the original comics The Invaders were a WWII superteam that counted Captain America and Bucky amongst its members. In the movie universe it looks like The Invaders will be a European team that works alongside Cap. The question at the time was would The Invaders just be a cameo or would they have a real part to play in the movie?

Yesterday I talked with The First Avenger: Captain America director Joe Johnston at the press day for The Wolfman, and he revealed to me that The Invaders were going to be a major presence in the film. 'They'll be in the entire second half,' he said.

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Evan Day   

Woah! And now CHUD reports Cap will be joined by the Invaders:

Last summer I talked to Marvel Studio's Kevin Feige, and he told me that The Invaders would appear in Captain America. In the original comics The Invaders were a WWII superteam that counted Captain America and Bucky amongst its members. In the movie universe it looks like The Invaders will be a European team that works alongside Cap. The question at the time was would The Invaders just be a cameo or would they have a real part to play in the movie?

Yesterday I talked with The First Avenger: Captain America director Joe Johnston at the press day for The Wolfman, and he revealed to me that The Invaders were going to be a major presence in the film. 'They'll be in the entire second half,' he said.

We knew this would have a great deal of "world building" for later movies, but I hadn't expected this!

My understanding is that "Namor the Sub-Mariner" is caught up in Fox with the rest of the X-men though.

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I'm not sure how they're going to do this and not have it look ridiculous. CA's costume was pretty over-the-top even by comic book standards and is going to be VERY hard to pull off in a movie. Further, it isn't something they can easily tone down, like the X-Men's costumes, because it is so closely tied to his identity. Very curious to see some actual footage from this one.

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EXCLUSIVE: Who Will Be Captain America?

I've learned that Marvel Studios and director Joe Johnston are ready to test candidates for Captain America, and I’ve got their wish list. I’m told that the contenders include Chace Crawford, John Krasinski, Scott Porter, Mike Vogel and Michael Cassidy. They also wanted Garrett Hedlund, but he so far hasn’t made a test deal. . . .

Mike Fleming, Deadline.com, February 24

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Umm, John Krasinski?

That was my first reaction, but then... I don't know. In some weird way I can almost see it.

I don't immediately recognize any of the other names.

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SDG   
I'm not sure how they're going to do this and not have it look ridiculous. CA's costume was pretty over-the-top even by comic book standards and is going to be VERY hard to pull off in a movie. Further, it isn't something they can easily tone down, like the X-Men's costumes, because it is so closely tied to his identity. Very curious to see some actual footage from this one.

More over the top than the Web Slinger?

Of course the half face mask does add a layer of difficulty, as we've seen with Batman.

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I'm not sure how they're going to do this and not have it look ridiculous. CA's costume was pretty over-the-top even by comic book standards and is going to be VERY hard to pull off in a movie. Further, it isn't something they can easily tone down, like the X-Men's costumes, because it is so closely tied to his identity. Very curious to see some actual footage from this one.

The "classic" suit from the comics is the one he'll wear as a promotional outfit when he's on tour. When he actually gets down to the business of being a WWII superhero, he has a new suit that has a militaristic/armored look.

Edited by Ryan H.

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