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Munyurangabo


Peter T Chattaway
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It was well received at Whitehead festival yesterday. I was impressed, but perhaps not as much as some others here. However, the "liberation is a journey" poem is worth the price of admission all by itself.

I'm curious as to whether a Rwandan audience would have known in some way that the two young men are hutu and tutsi prior to our being told in the film.

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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  • 1 month later...

Isaac's followup, Lucky Life, is getting its premiere next month at the Tribeca Film Festival! I've had the opportunity to see this film in a couple different cuts, and it's a fantastic movie. It's very different from Munyurangabo, which always struck me as a very Western film about Africa. Lucky Life is about middle-class Brooklynites in their early-30s but feels like it could have been made in Taiwan.

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  • 1 year later...

This isn't to do with Munyurangabo, per se, but it's about Rwandans making Rwandan movies and showing them to Rwandans, so:

http://vimeo.com/20199460

There were also a few articles a few weeks back, during the Tribeca film festival, about a movie called Grey Matter, which was described by The Playlist as "the very first movie made by a Rwandan in his homeland". The director of that film is (or has been) associated with the Rwanda Cinema Center

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 years later...

In the Glen Workshop seminar I led last week, we watched, studied, and discussed this film. I made a list of my students' questions about the film's content and form. Then I surprised them by bringing Lee Isaac Chung up on the screen to answer questions in a Google Hangout Q&A. The picture and sound were crystal clear, and there was no delay in our Santa Fe / Brooklyn connection. Isaac was humble, funny, generous, and full of insights. 

 

A good time was had by all.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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  • 7 years later...

I just revisited this film and was so excited by my rewatch that I had to write about it here on Letterboxd :

https://letterboxd.com/brian_d/film/munyurangabo/

The local Rwandan collaboration aspect was what really struck me this time, and I think that this is what made this film what it is.  Chung had the grace to be humble and get out of the way.  He allowed the film to belong to Rwanda and these Rwandans, and so the film seems to come from the heart of this Rwandan moment in history.  A case study in the humility of an artist leading the way for beauty and truth to come to the fore.  Who would have thought?

Excerpt of my review:

"I am tempted here to praise Chung as a film genius for allowing this kind of collaboration to take place, and such may not be far from the truth. It may be more clear-sighted, however, to praise the local Rwandan actors and crew who were allowed to make this film their own and allowed to make it such an essential expression of their own culture and history."

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