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matt_nightingale

Stephen King - 'Salem's Lot

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I just finished reading this book... Really enjoyed it. I always seem to slip into thriller/horror mode sometimes during the summer; not quite sure why. Anyone else into Stephen King? I read Cell last summer and really didn't like it very much, but 'Salem's Lot was very satisfying. I've also read Misery and The Shining, but I think that's it. Any other recommendations?

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After dismissing King for years (though I'd never read him), I roared through On Writing in 2006, and I've appreciated him since. He's not the best writer alive

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NBooth   

The only King I've read is his a-typical The Colorado Kid for the Hard Case Crime line of books. It's not horror or supernatural; in fact, it consists entirely of a woman and two old men discussing a decades-old murder. It moves at a brisk pace and does a good job pointing out the tension between "genre" and "reality" in genre fiction, and beyond that, it looks at with the ways we deal with life itself--not in a very deep way, but still pretty ambitious for a detective story.

Edited by NBooth

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I recently got back into Sai-King (hence my screen name). I started out with The Dark Tower series, just finished Cell, and have started Nightmares & Dreamscapes. B)

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Jacques   

Desperation- a classic starts off with a bang and never lets up.... when i first read this i thought King was taking a Christian turn due to one of the characters and where it goes.

Bag of Bones....a love story/ghost story, about u guessed it, a middle aged writer living in Maine. even better- get this bad boy on audio as the King miester himself reads the complete text ...a real treat in of itself. His aptitude for dialogue is as usual stunning and to hear the variety of accents he does for each character makes it a rewarding experience- especially if confined on some long road or plane trip.

ill second the Dark Tower series of seven books... pure solid King, great characters

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Jacques: I love the audio recommendation! Thanks. I wonder sometimes if authors are the best readers of their own works. You would think they would be, but I've heard a few titles that have suffered from being read by the authors.

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Jacques   
Jacques: I love the audio recommendation! Thanks. I wonder sometimes if authors are the best readers of their own works.

Ditto Mister C. I suffered through a few...the worst was an Lp recording of Hemingway...he would of been better reading the poems of Emily Dickenson.. that bad. Oh and i forgot to add, plz do be careful if ur driving and listening... no joke its that good- so be vigilant if alone for i found myself, as did the wife-erama, caught up so by the narration :blink: .

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Stephen King’s ‘Drunken Fireworks’ to Arrive as Audiobook, Free Stream

CBS Corp.’s Simon & Schuster Audio is releasing a new Stephen King short story titled “Drunken Fireworks” exclusively as a CD audiobook and digital download on June 30th. ... CBS Radio, which is also owned by CBS Corp., intends to stream the audiobook for free on July 2 across its new audio platform Play.it. In hopes of reminding people to tune in, CBS Radio stations in more than 20 markets will air 15-second promotions for four days starting June 29.

Edited by Christian

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NBooth   

I read this novel (on audiobook) earlier this year but didn't realize we had a thread on it. It's quite good. Obviously, its basic plot is pretty much that of Dracula (at least, as I understand it--I've not read the Stoker novel), but what's interesting here is that it's Dracula by way of Peyton Place and Kings Row (both of which King namedrops in the introduction to the edition I listened to). The idea that 'Salems Lot was already infested with evil before the Big Evil shows up (and that's why the BE is able to make its home there) is pretty much a development of the ideas in the two earlier novels (and, heck, let's go back--in Main Street). So, of course, given my interests at the moment I really enjoyed this novel.

Not unrelated: "Chapter Ten (The Lot III)" (the one beginning "The town knew about darkness") is probably my favorite section of the novel.

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