Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Overstreet

Sherlock Holmes (2009)

Recommended Posts

As a lifelong reader and fan of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's memorable hero, this sounds like an absolutely terrible idea. Robert Downey Jr. could, in a better project, make a decent Holmes. But the fact that Guy Ritchie is directing fills me with dread. The last thing this character needs is some hip, ultra-edgy, violent and ironic reboot. At this point, the comedic Sacha Baron Cohen/Will Ferrell version will be more faithful to the original characters

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to have to track down the source of this information, but I heard a snippet of a radio broadcast this morning that mentioned that this version of Sherlock Holmes is going to take place in present day. I really hope this isn't the case, and will do some further research. It was definely a story about Guy Ritchie's version and the casting of Robert Downey Jr., and not the Sacha Baron Coen/Will Farrell comedy.

Edited by Baal_T'shuvah

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm. Is this necessarily worse than the Basil Rathbone stories taking place during World War II (i.e. when they were filmed)?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't this version supposed to be based more on a comic book than the original stories? I think I remember reading that way back when the rumors first started; in which case, the setting might be drawn from the comic itself.... (anyone read it?)

EDIT: "Wired" 'blog from June 16:

A new Sherlock Holmes comic by film producer and writer Lionel Wigram was picked up for development by Warner Bros. -- where Wigram serves as an executive producer on the Harry Potter series. The comics depict Holmes as more of a sword-wielding action hero than the purely pipe-smoking intellectual of many other films and TV shows.
[Emphasis mine]

Which is funny, because Holmes in the stories is pretty active (picks fights in pubs) and is hinted to possess great strength (bends a poker with his bare hands)--so it's not like this direction is wholly novel. It's more like a violent correction to the mistaken view of Holmes as a somewhat effete thinker; this modernization could be part of that.

Edited by NBooth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm going to have to track down the source of this information, but I heard a snippet of a radio broadcast this morning that mentioned that this version of Sherlock Holmes is going to take place in present day. I really hope this isn't the case, and will do some further research. It was definely a story about Guy Ritchie's version and the casting of Robert Downey Jr., and not the Sacha Baron Coen/Will Farrell comedy.

Well, I thought this bit of news was something I heard on one of the many NPR shows I listen to during the day, but that was not the case. Turns out it was a bit of unsubstantiated rumor that was being passed along by Mark Thompson of the Mark and Brian show, a morning radio show here in L.A., and syndicated nationally in some markets. He was just passing on a rumor that he had heard "somewhere". If you've ever heard the show then, like me, you take Mark's movie updates with a grain of salt, as they are usually wrong more than they are right.


Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jude Law in talks for 'Sherlock'

Law is expected to close a deal shortly to play Watson, the super-sleuth's sidekick.

Variety, September 18


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmmm. Is this necessarily worse than the Basil Rathbone stories taking place during World War II (i.e. when they were filmed)?

It's just as bad, anyway. Sherlock Holmes in Washington was pretty dreadful. "Look, Holmes! The Capitol building!"


Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rachel McAdams has joined the cast, playing Irene Adler, Holmes' love interest in A Scandal in Bohemia.

Story here.


Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jason Isaacs would be the perfect Sherlock Holmes. Robert Downey Jr., not so much ... but as long as it keeps Downey from working on Sylvester Stallone's Edgar Allan Poe biopic, I'll be happy.


Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Downey to play Sherlock Holmes as studio eyes series

Robert Downey Jr. is to play Victorian super sleuth Sherlock Holmes in an upcoming blockbuster that studio Warner Bros. hopes will become a lucrative new franchise.

The 43-year-old said one reason he was chosen for the role may have been his involvement in action movie "Iron Man," which earned over $570 million in global ticket sales this year, and he promised his Holmes would be the best screen portrayal ever.

"In case you aren't aware I had a hell of a summer, and it's made me much more viable to play a lead role than I might have (been) in the past," Downey Jr. told reporters in London, where shooting on "Sherlock Holmes" is about to begin.

When asked what he could bring to a character portrayed countless times on film and television, he joked: "Clearly I'm going to do it better than it's ever been done.

"The more I read about it the more overwhelmed I was by the weight of it and the amount of people who will be watching to see if it's gotten right."

Reuters, October 1


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm going to have to track down the source of this information, but I heard a snippet of a radio broadcast this morning that mentioned that this version of Sherlock Holmes is going to take place in present day. I really hope this isn't the case, and will do some further research. It was definely a story about Guy Ritchie's version and the casting of Robert Downey Jr., and not the Sacha Baron Coen/Will Farrell comedy.
Empire photographers scotch this particular rumour.

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is That You, Sherlock?

Sure, he will still be smarter than everyone within a three-planet radius, and he will retain his uncanny ability to intuit whole life stories from the tiniest speck of dust on a shoe. But he will do those things while being a man of action, a chaser, shooter and pummeler of criminals


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
USA Today mentioned en passant the other day that the villain in this film will be "an occult-dabbling Satanist" based on Aleister Crowley. Had anyone here heard this before?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
USA Today mentioned en passant the other day that the villain in this film will be "an occult-dabbling Satanist" based on Aleister Crowley. Had anyone here heard this before?

Sherlock Holmes versus an occultist? Yes, by gum, I have heard that before ... it was the worst Holmes-based film I have ever seen.


Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
USA Today mentioned en passant the other day that the villain in this film will be "an occult-dabbling Satanist" based on Aleister Crowley. Had anyone here heard this before?

Wasn't Guy Ritchie married to "an occult-dabbling Kabbalist"?


"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others." - Groucho Marx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your ideas about Holmes and Watson come from the books, then the thought of them both being action hero types won't bother you much


Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm currently reading Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. Not to give anything away, but it's a self-styled detective novel. and the narrator ends one of the chapters with a couple of interesting facts about Sherlock Holmes:

  1. Holmes is never described as wearing a deer-hunter cap in the original Doyle stories. It was the addition of an illustrator.
  2. Holmes never says "Elementary, my dear Watson," in the Doyle stories. This was a later addition of a TV/radio adaptation.

I've read a few of the Holmes short stories, and I wouldn't call myself a Holmes expert by a long shot, but it seems to me that Ritchie has an opportunity to really play with the popular perceptions of the general audience, and yet deliver something that could conceivably be true to the source material.

I felt the same way when some friends with whom I had a discussion about Quantum of Solace complained that this latest Bond, more so even than Casino Royale, didn't "feel like Bond" because of a dearth of gadgets, etc. I countered that, on the contrary, as a fan of the Fleming books and short stories, this felt pretty authentic to me on the whole. I even enjoyed that elements of the film reminded me of the short story "For Your Eyes Only", with Camille reminding me of Judy Havelock.

Anyway, when a character like Bond or Holmes enters the popular imagination through film, and the film elements begin to displace the original texts, it becomes interesting (or perhaps even meaningless) to discuss what is the more "authentic" take on the character FWIW.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a fair number of Holmes stories growing up, but I sadly don't remember them as much as I would like. (I do remember liking them, though my pre-teen brain didn't 'get' them that well.) Anyway, the trailer looks like the film could be a Lot of Well-Made Fun. So color me excited.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anders wrote:

: I've read a few of the Holmes short stories, and I wouldn't call myself a Holmes expert by a long shot, but it seems to me that Ritchie has an opportunity to really play with the popular perceptions of the general audience, and yet deliver something that could conceivably be true to the source material.

An opportunity, definitely. Though I can't recall Holmes ever dealing with genuinely supernatural threats before. In stories like The Hound of the Baskervilles, the phenomena in question tended to have naturalistic explanations, as I recall. (Sir Arthur was a fan of the occult himself, of course; I just don't recall him getting into any of that stuff in the Sherlock Holmes stories.)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's an exchange between Holmes and Watson in chapter 3 of The Hound of the Baskervilles where Holmes has worked himself into something of a trance with the aid of very strong tobacco, and hints at a belief in a kind of astral projection:

"On the contrary, I have been to Devonshire."

"In spirit?"

"Exactly. My body has remained in this armchair and has, I regret to observe, consumed in my absence two large pots of coffee and an incredible amount of tobacco. After you left I sent down to Stamford's for the Ordnance map of this portion of the moor, and my spirit has hovered over it all day. I flatter myself that I could find my way about."

"A large-scale map, I presume?"

"Very large." He unrolled one section and held it over his knee. "Here you have the particular district which concerns us. That is Baskerville Hall in the middle."

"With a wood round it?"

"Exactly. I fancy the yew alley, though not marked under that name, must stretch along this line, with the moor, as you perceive, upon the right of it. This small clump of buildings here is the hamlet of Grimpen, where our friend Dr. Mortimer has his headquarters. Within a radius of five miles there are, as you see, only a very few scattered dwellings. Here is Lafter Hall, which was mentioned in the narrative. There is a house indicated here which may be the residence of the naturalist -- Stapleton, if I remember right, was his name. Here are two moorland farmhouses, High Tor and Foulmire. Then fourteen miles away the great convict prison of Princetown. Between and around these scattered points extends the desolate, lifeless moor. This, then, is the stage upon which tragedy has been played, and upon which we may help to play it again."

"It must be a wild place."

"Yes, the setting is a worthy one. If the devil did desire to have a hand in the affairs of men -- "

"Then you are yourself inclining to the supernatural explanation."

"The devil's agents may be of flesh and blood, may they not? There are two questions waiting for us at the outset. The one is whether any crime has been committed at all; the second is, what is the crime and how was it committed? Of course, if Dr. Mortimer's surmise should be correct, and we are dealing with forces outside the ordinary laws of Nature, there is an end of our investigation. But we are bound to exhaust all other hypotheses before falling back upon this one. I think we'll shut that window again, if you don't mind. It is a singular thing, but I find that a concentrated atmosphere helps a concentration of thought. I have not pushed it to the length of getting into a box to think, but that is the logical outcome of my convictions."

Actually, there is a Buddhist discipline of meditating for an extended period of time in darkness ... more or less getting into a box to think. This is as close as Holmes ever gets to any sort of spiritual talk, and it is interesting that such a thoroughly rational character was created by an ardent promoter of spiritualism.

Edited by mrmando

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...