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U2 - No Line on the Horizon (March 2009)


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Andy Whitman wrote:

: Rattle and Hum, the 1986 live/studio beast, was originally released as a double-album vinyl set. It has since been re-released on one very long CD.

Since? My CD has always been one disc. (And it came out in 1988, when the movie did, one year after The Joshua Tree, the tour of which is the subject of the film.)

But yeah, I can see how that album would have required two platters on vinyl. Hmmm. Kind of a grey area, this one.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Andy Whitman wrote:

: Rattle and Hum, the 1986 live/studio beast, was originally released as a double-album vinyl set. It has since been re-released on one very long CD.

Since? My CD has always been one disc. (And it came out in 1988, when the movie did, one year after The Joshua Tree, the tour of which is the subject of the film.)

But yeah, I can see how that album would have required two platters on vinyl. Hmmm. Kind of a grey area, this one.

Yes, certainly a grey area. I bought the album on vinyl, and it was definitely a two-album set. The transition to CDs was underway at that point, but hardly a mainstream phenomenon. But otherwise, no, other than the two-disc Greatest Hits packages, and the re-released/enhanced versions of the earlier albums, there's been no multiple-disc U2 release.

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Andy Whitman wrote:

: The transition to CDs was underway at that point, but hardly a mainstream phenomenon.

Very true. I lived in a Bible-school dorm between Fall '87 and Spring '88, and there was only one guy there who had a CD player; it was, in fact, the first time I had seen such a player up close, and I made a point of buying one a month or two after I got home, as soon as I had made enough money at my summer job. (If memory serves, my first CD player cost about $350, about the same as a Blu-Ray player today, or yesterday.)

That year at Bible school was also the year when The Joshua Tree was big, big, big (along with INXS's Kick, the soundtrack to The Lost Boys, Petra's This Means War and various other things that got played a lot in the dorm). And I remember talking to one of my FORMER dorm-mates over the phone about Rattle and Hum when the movie was new, some time AFTER our year at Bible school had come to an end. So the chronology of those particular albums is very vivid in my mind. :)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Q Magazine describes eleven new songs-- and though it's unclear, it seems as though the order in which they list them is probably pretty close to the album's tracklisting. (At least, the song they describe last is noted to be the album closer.)

Also worth noting, especially for Peter: Amazon is listing the vinyl version of the album as a double album, which means that the album is over 60 minutes long. And is you count vinyl, then no, this isn't the first U2 double album-- Pop also clocked in at over an hour and occupies two LPs.

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They were still releasing albums on vinyl as late as Pop!?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Dude, the vinyl section at my local department store is getting bigger all the time. Vinyl is definitely back. I've purchased the last few Over the Rhine albums on vinyl, and I'm sorely tempted by copies of Icky Thump, In Rainbows, and White Chalk that are sitting on the display rack at the Fred Myer store in my neighborhood. I will probably lose all restraint when I see this U2 album sitting there. My Joshua Tree vinyl is in pristine condition.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Dude, the vinyl section at my local department store is getting bigger all the time. Vinyl is definitely back. I've purchased the last few Over the Rhine albums on vinyl, and I'm sorely tempted by copies of Icky Thump, In Rainbows, and White Chalk that are sitting on the display rack at the Fred Myer store in my neighborhood. I will probably lose all restraint when I see this U2 album sitting there. My Joshua Tree vinyl is in pristine condition.

Very true. I am something of a minor deity (somewhere lower than Father, Son, Holy Spirit, Shane Claiborne, and N.T. Wright, but higher than James Dobson) in my church precisely because of my massive vinyl collection. Kids in their twenties tend to walk into my den, which is lined from floor to ceiling with shelf after shelf of vinyl, and fall to their knees. "Arise," I tell them. "I am a mere man, just like you. But you may kiss the debut Mission of Burma on clear vinyl holy relic."

It's been amusing to me to watch the resurgence of vinyl. After drinking the "CDs/MP3s are indestructible and sound better than LPs" Kool Ade, a lot of people have concluded (and rightly, I might add), that vinyl albums, at least those that have been kept in decent shape, actually sound better than their digital competitors, and that they haven't had the life compressed out of them. Sadly, most of my LPs have also been played frequently (a weakness I have), and aren't in the best shape. But I have quite a few that would fetch quite a lot of money at the local vinyl emporiums if I ever decided to part with them. And the local vinyl emporiums (AKA Used Record Stores) are thriving, unlike their big-box counterparts that sell only CDs.

I'm glad. I love vinyl. I love listening to albums as albums, and not as a series of downloadable songs and cellphone ringtones. And I love big gatefold album covers, filled with extensive liner notes and accompanying lyric sheet. And posters! I have dozens of vinyl albums that came with posters of the artist/band. Try doing that with an MP3 file.

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Overstreet wrote:

: Dude, the vinyl section at my local department store is getting bigger all the time.

Andy Whitman wrote:

: And the local vinyl emporiums (AKA Used Record Stores) are thriving, unlike their big-box counterparts that sell only CDs.

Trying to reconcile these two statements ... trying ... trying ... well, okay, obviously Jeff and Andy live in different cities, for one thing ...

I am still kinda surprised to hear that as techno-ish an album as Pop was released in vinyl, though, and in the mid-'90s to boot. Or was that album not as digital as my memory suggests?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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higher than James Dobson)

Great name for a band! LOL

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

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Overstreet wrote:

: Dude, the vinyl section at my local department store is getting bigger all the time.

Andy Whitman wrote:

: And the local vinyl emporiums (AKA Used Record Stores) are thriving, unlike their big-box counterparts that sell only CDs.

Trying to reconcile these two statements ... trying ... trying ... well, okay, obviously Jeff and Andy live in different cities, for one thing ...

I am still kinda surprised to hear that as techno-ish an album as Pop was released in vinyl, though, and in the mid-'90s to boot. Or was that album not as digital as my memory suggests?

I can't speak for Seattle. In Columbus, Ohio, we have department stores, but they don't sell vinyl records. Perfume, yes, and lingerie. But no vinyl records. And we have big-box stores like Circuit City and Best Buy that sell CDs, but not vinyl. For whatever reasons, possibly because the locals are losing their jobs in droves, several of them have gone out of business over the past few months. I do know that the used music stores that are doing well (and there aren't that many of them) are the ones that focus on vinyl.

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Fred Meyer, the "one-stop shopping center" near my house, is a big department store... like Target, but with the emphasis on groceries instead of clothes. In their electronics department, they have a lame CD-selection of whatever America is buying right now. (If they have a copy of Fleet Foxes, wow, they're really getting progressive!) But for some reason, they've got a happenin' vinyl collection right as you walk into their electronics section.

But that's an altogether different thing from *music* stores. Yes, Tower Records shops have vanished. A couple of independent music stores are still doing well here, or seem to be: Sonic Boom and Everyday Music. But both of those shops are featuring vinyl now too. Sonic Boom stepped up and opened a new vinyl-only shop a few years back, but that didn't work too well, and it recently closed.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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They were still releasing albums on vinyl as late as Pop!?

Yes. I have "The Best of 1990-2000", "All That You Can't Leave Behind" and "How to Dismantle An Atomic Bomb" on vinyl. Skip the last one as the CD sounds much better. The vinyl version of HTMAAB sounds like MP3 version of the songs. The other two sound records sound decent.

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Huh, look what turned up in my inbox the other day:

- - -

Back to the future: Vinyl record sales double in '08, CDs down

Rainbo Records, which has been pressing vinyl LPs since 1955, doubled its production from 2006 to 2007 and more than doubled record output this past year. The company currently presses 25,000 albums a day; that's up from a low of about 6,000 to 8,000 a day in the late 1980s through the late 1990s, when CDs were in their heyday. Since then, there's been a steady increase in vinyl production. Surprisingly, Sheldon doesn't attribute that rise to Gen Xers or even baby boomers, but to 13-to-24-year-olds rediscovering the aesthetic value of record collections.

Computerworld, January 2

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Is this the album cover?

CAPA.jpg

If it is... it's a clever return to the Boy motif...

But would they really include a kid wearing a U2 shirt on the cover?

Plus,

Rolling Stone's article about the album has a different track list than Q's.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Is this the album cover?

CAPA.jpg

If it is... it's a clever return to the Boy motif...

But would they really include a kid wearing a U2 shirt on the cover?

Plus,

Rolling Stone's article about the album has a different track list than Q's.

I actually like that cover quite a bit. If it's a fan-made cover, it's a pretty darn good one. And as for the length of the album, there was an interview with Bono floating around a few days ago in which he was asked to describe the album in one word, and he said "long." Maybe that was even in the Q Magazine article.

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Hmmm... if you add the songs listed in Q to the ones listed in Rolling Stone, and assume that "Stand Up" and "Stand Up Comedy" are the same track, that still leaves at least twelve songs on this record, which would indeed make it the longest U2 album since Pop, at least in terms of the number of tracks.

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