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Overstreet

Rachel Getting Married

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I wish I had more time to really delve into film, but in the end I get a lot more out of reading than I do out of participating in these kinds of conversations, since I tend to get really defensive about films I liked.[/threadjack]
I understand. If someone were to say anything bad about The Three Amigos, I'd find a way to reach through the computer and punch them in the face.

What if I told you I hadn't ever seen it!

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Admittedly again, I guess I misread you. I felt that your statement was a categorical rejection of anyone finding the film "believable." I would argue seriously with your impression, but MLeary and Andy have made my knee jerk ramblings feel a little immature.

I had the same inclinations towards the film until recently, so premature may be better than immature.

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I wish I had more time to really delve into film, but in the end I get a lot more out of reading than I do out of participating in these kinds of conversations, since I tend to get really defensive about films I liked.[/threadjack]
I understand. If someone were to say anything bad about The Three Amigos, I'd find a way to reach through the computer and punch them in the face.

What if I told you I hadn't ever seen it!

You would just make me sad.

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Watched this again over the weekend with Anne. Loved every minute of it. The more I watch this film, the more I realize that Sidney really is a wonderful character. Some criticized the film saying Sidney's a "blank." But no, he isn't. Quiet? Yes. Sensitive? Very. Observant? Yes. Talented? Wise? Yes.

And it really does make sense to me that the community has such a cultural/ethnic mix.

One of the African American characters refers to his longtime friendship Rachel's father and his past involvement with a jazz combo at some point. They both have friends from the jazz world. Those in attendance at this pre-wedding gathering seem familiar with this history. And others in the community shows a lot of connection with colorful musical endeavors. Music is what's brought these families and traditions together. I've seen communities like this bond, cross-culturally, through music and art many times. I have no trouble believing in such a melting-pot of a gathering. I guess what you've experienced will greatly influence how plausible you find this community.

But here's the real reason I'm bringing this up.

Sidney is played by Tunde Adebimpe, who happens to be a member of the band TV on the Radio. I like his performance a lot, especially considering how it is a nice contrast to the more flamboyant characters. I said to Anne, "I'd like to see this guy in more movies."

As soon as we finished watching the film, I told Anne it was her turn to pick our dinnertime movie for the next week. (We've been watching films in installments, due to our busy schedules.) So, out of our vast library of DVDs and VHS, she chose one that was unopened, one that was new to both of us.

Jump Tomorrow.

We put it in last night and started watching.

And, to our amazement, who should be playing the tall, softspoken, soon-to-be-married, romantic lead?

Tunde Adebimpe.

Edited by Overstreet

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Watched this again over the weekend with Anne. Loved every minute of it. The more I watch this film, the more I realize that Sidney really is a wonderful character. Some criticized the film saying Sidney's a "blank." But no, he isn't. Quiet? Yes. Sensitive? Very. Observant? Yes. Talented? Wise? Yes.

Doesn't sound macho or manly at all...therefore...a blank. ;)

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If beauty draws them into a sense of what is profound, I'm certainly not going to get in their way. I think they'd all benefit from drawing closer and closer to the sacred. But they do seem to believe in God, they don't recoil at the openly Christian sentiments of the African Americans, and that was rather refreshing for this moviegoer.

I realize I'm pulling this out (and somewhat out of context) over a year later, but, hey, I just saw the movie.

I found three things odd about Rachel Getting Married.

1) My head still hurts from the frying pan scene. You know, the one in which Kym is driving, sees a "fork in the road" sign, and then refuses to turn, crashing into the trees. Wasn't Frost from New England? The road less traveled, indeed.

2) The Indian-themed wedding. Didn't they see The Namesake? That wasn't a real Indian wedding. Good thing no actual Indians were invited.

3) Sidney's family. On a serious note, I think it was more important for the film to have black folk in it, than to have black folk in it. I really had my disbelief unsuspended at the rehearsal dinner and the wedding by Sidney's family's absolute lack of reaction to the randomness about the wedding. I think the white folks of Rachel Getting Married didn't recoil at the openly Christian (the grandmother comment?) because there was neither openly Christian nor African American culture on display. They were not people; they were ciphers for some grand lesson. And that lack of engagement with Sidney's family, and vice versa, of the family's engagement with the wedding events was a missed opportunity.

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