Andy Whitman

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So is this a Firefox-only issue? Or is it only in Firefox that there's a third-party extension patching the issue? What about platform -- are Windows and MacOS equally vulnerable?

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SDG wrote:

: So is this a Firefox-only issue? Or is it only in Firefox that there's a third-party extension patching the issue?

The latter, I believe.

FWIW, I believe this video was created in response to the recent release of Firesheep, a Firefox extension that makes it really easy to see the other accounts on your network. But the problem would exist with or without Firesheep. (I don't know if it's quite the same thing, but note how Google recently revealed that it had collected lots of passwords and e-mails with its Google Street View cars.)

: What about platform -- are Windows and MacOS equally vulnerable?

No idea.

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So is this a Firefox-only issue? Or is it only in Firefox that there's a third-party extension patching the issue? What about platform -- are Windows and MacOS equally vulnerable?

The OS X is just as vulnerable as Windows. It's not technically an OS vulnerability that Firesheep exploits as much as a vulnerability in the way most "secure" websites work. There's a really good writeup on the whole Firesheep fiasco here, which includes measures you can take to protect yourself (the easiest and least technical of which is not to access private sites on open networks).

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If you use Facebook, you should read this. For your own safety.

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Teens join Twitter to escape parents on Facebook: survey

Teens don't tweet, will never tweet – too public, too many older users. Not cool.

That's been the prediction for a while now, born of numbers showing that fewer than one in 10 teens were using Twitter early on.

But then their parents, grandparents, neighbours, parents' friends and anyone in-between started friending them on Facebook, the social networking site of choice for many — and a curious thing began to happen. . . .

The growing popularity teens report fits with findings from the Pew Internet & American Life Project, a non-profit organization that monitors people's tech-based habits. The migration has been slow, but steady. A Pew survey last July found that 16 per cent of young people, ages 12 to 17, said they used Twitter. Two years earlier, that percentage was just eight per cent. . . .

“The first group to colonize Twitter were people in the technology industry — consummate self-promoters,” says Alice Marwick, a post-doctoral researcher at Microsoft Research, who tracks young people's online habits.

For teens, self-promotion isn't usually the goal. At least until they go to college and start thinking about careers, social networking is, well, social.

But as Twitter has grown, so have the ways people, and communities, use it. . . .

Associated Press, January 30

Facebook Says It’s Losing Young Teens

The post-market rally in Facebook shares collapsed like a souffle after the company made the disclosure in a conference call with analysts. The stock price was up about 15% after it released strong Q3 earnings. But the price is now virtually flat after CFO David Ebersam said the company had seen a drop in use among young teens. “Our best analysis on youth engagement in the U.S. reveals that usage of Facebook among U.S. teens overall was stable from Q2 to Q3, but we did see a decrease in daily users, specially among younger teens.” Although he considers the data of “questionable statistical significance,” he added that he “wanted to share this with you now since we get a lot of questions about teens.” Indeed, early this month investment firm Piper Jaffray said in its “Taking Stock With Teens” survey that “the popularity of Facebook is waning among teens, with 23% citing it as the most important [social media platform], down from 33% six months ago and 42% a year ago.” That seemed to contradict CEO Mark Zuckerberg‘s comment to analysts in July that while “there has been a lot of speculation reporting that fewer teens are using Facebook,” company data showed that it “just isn’t true. … We believe that we’re close to fully penetrated in the U.S. teen demographic for a while and the number of teens using Facebook on both a daily and monthly basis has been steady over the past year and half.”

Deadline.com, October 30

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Facebook conducted an experiment to see if they can emotionally manipulate users. Turns out they can.

 

 

A face-to-face encounter with someone who is sad or cheerful can leave us feeling the same way. This emotional contagion has been shown to last anywhere from a few seconds to weeks.

 

A team of researchers, led by Adam Kramer at Facebook in Menlo Park, California, was curious to see if this phenomenon would occur online. To find out, they manipulated which posts showed up on the news feeds of more than 600,000 Facebook users. For one week, some users saw fewer posts with negative emotional words than usual, while others saw fewer posts with positive ones.

 

Digital emotions proved somewhat contagious, too. People were more likely to use positive words in Facebook posts if they had been exposed to fewer negative posts throughout the week, and vice versa. The effect was significant, though modest (PNAS, doi.org/tcg).

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post-19-0-30369800-1417985315_thumb.png

 

PLEASE HELP:

 

Every time I open Facebook and check Notifications, I some kind of invasive image. For a while, it was some stranger's picture. Now it's a message in Arabic. 

 

What steps should I take to address this? Anybody know? The messages for what to do about malware are not very helpful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Have you tried running the text through Google Translate?

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No. Can I do that with an image?

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Hmm. Guess not. Unless there's a way to run OCR on it?

 

EDIT: Ok, so I used the Microsoft snip tool to isolate the Arabic text and then ran the image through this. That gives us:

 

عندها هققرب الموت لة نقذقر أولانك الذين
خذلونا يوصأ بل سأعإ أكثز «ولائك الذين
خذلناهم ، فنمذ حنينها نمقا ج السما ح ممن
ترجعناهخ أكبر من السير ها٢نققاع معن
أوجعونا ع

 

 
--which Google tells me means:
 
Then Ehgqrb his death Nqzqr who Olanc
But let us down Aoso Saaa Oktz « loyalty who
Khzlnahm , Venmz nostalgic Nmqa c Sama who h
Trdjanahkh greater than Sir Ha2nqha Maan
Ojona p

 

--which, in turn, means nothing that I can tell. So we're no closer to figuring out what's up with your Facebook, but we do know that the text is gibberish. 

Edited by NBooth

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So we're no closer to figuring out what's up with your Facebook, but we do know that the text is gibberish.

 

Eh, not necessarily. Google Translate, in my experience, is almost completely useless for Asian languages.

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A person here seems to be having the same issue, but only in Chrome.

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As of today, the images have disappeared for me, so maybe Facebook is resolving it behind the scenes.

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