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Brent_Dude33

Salary Cap in MLB.

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People talk about hockey players making to much money and that they dont put their skills to use. Well how about Baseball recently the big deal in MLB was A.Rod going to the Yankees a team that has pretty much all the money in the world(so to say). A.Rod will be making 22.5Million a year i believe for 4 years. Man we complain in hockey when a guy wants to make 8 million.

I really do think MLB needs a sallery cap teams like the Yankees and Arizona have so much money. Look what Florida did awhile go they had money so they bought a wining team. Now nothing wrong with getting a winning team after all sports is all about winning the big game is it not?

Now what really makes me mad is when teams(I'm going to pic on the Yankees some more here) They have this raw tallent on the field and they cant win a world series. Somethings wrong with that coaching maybe? When a teams like the Angels make the World Series and the Yankees dont you know its trouble.

Maybe with a sallery cap teams would be able to be more balanced and every season each team has a fair shot at winning or atleast making the playoffs. I like teams like the Cubs not to big on the payroll but they have their star player Sosa. Then you look at the Yankees almost every palyer is a star. If those star Players could be distributed through out the MLB i think teams would be better evenly matched.

I dont know about you guys but Sallery cap in MLB would be very smart. Exept to say the players would probebly have a walkout or soemthing cause Oh noo there making $10-$20million a season. Man i would love to just make $100,000 playing a sport.


"Whos more of the fool,the fool or the fool who follows". Obi-Wan Kenobi

Brent M.

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Hey, it's all about the Andro. Seriously, the last few yearsd have demonstrated that money helps get you to the table, but anything can happen at the table. Most teams in the playoffs are high spending teams, but any team can get hot in a seven game series. Besides, if only money gets you there why has Minnesota gotten there a few times and almost made it since? What about the A's? Every year dude. With one of the lowest payrolls in baseball. A salary cap isn't going to happen because too many teams would suffer (ie. payrolls less than at present) and a change in policy needs too many votes of the owners. A majority agrees with you, but not enough to change the rules. The small mkt teams have to figure out other ways to compete.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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I'm somewhat ambivalent on this issue, but I'm inclined to agree with you, Rich. The success of the A's, Twins, and the 2003 Marlins indicate that it's not all about the quantity of money, but how wisely it's used. The fact that a big spender like Angelos, the owner of the Orioles, can't put together a team that finishes above .500 confirms the same point. (BTW, I say all this as a lifelong loather of the Yankees.)

Where I wish the baseball brain trust would exert some pressure and moral authority is on the steroid issue. I'm sickened by how this has poisoned the game, and (as a timely application) I'd like to see an asterisk by Barry Bonds' name in the record book -- when I see video of him early in his career and compare it to his present build, I find it well-nigh impossible to believe that his performance is not chemically-derived to a large measure.


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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I agree with you up to a point about Bonds. Yes his (and Sosa's and Maguire's for that matter) performance has been "enhanced". Seems like Griffey could use some. He was the early pick to do it all. OTOH, like Aaron, Bonds has turned himself into a thinking man's ballplayer. There is little he can't do on offense. At 40. He reminds me of Aaron in that regard. Other than the line drive dingers that just dripped over the fence, Aaron stole bases, broke the record for doubles before he caught Ruth. For a while he owned almost all offensive records.

To apply Bill James a bit for this argument, maybe the records themselves are not as important as comparisons with one's colleagues during one's career. Bonds towers over this enhanced, new bandbox park, light air in Denver era. Some of his more obscure statistics like slugging percentage and OPB are right there with Ruth and Cobb (the respective alltime leaders), towering over other dead titans.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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BobCostas a few years ago had his prescription for fixing baseball. It included a salary cap, also extensive revenue sharing, gate sharing. Not a bad overall proposal, except that nobody (owners or players) would go for it and it would have to be the entire proposal to even things out.

Of course, the high salaries are the result how the players and owners view the market. As to the idea that you'd be happy playing sports for $100K. Most people who are among the top 600 in the world in what they do get paid accordingly. Actors, CEOs, artists, stock brokers. What does the best in the world get paid?


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Not that I want to say goodbye small markets, but there are other options too. We've expanded north, but more players are still coming in from the south. What about Mexico City and other large Mexican cities? What about San Juan? Caracas and Havana would be ideal down the road if political situations changed.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Man ive got this great picture of Barry Bonds. But for some reason it wont work when i try to post it. But man you should see this pic, Its Bonds Rookie card haha the guy is like 4 times the size now adays.

Where I wish the baseball brain trust would exert some pressure and moral authority is on the steroid issue.

I must Totally agree with that. Steriods are making the sport of baseball crazy. Guys are so big its insane, It seems to me the League only questions the guys they feel need to be questioned about steriods.

Its bad enough that Steriods do damage to your body over time. But also the fact that kids see their favorite Baseball star Belting Home run after home run and then they think, Wow hes so big no wonder he can hit those balls so far. Then the kids later on in life do steriods or look at steriods as being a way to get big fast and easy.

I would almost rather have the Baseball players use Cork Bats atleast its not hurting their body. Its sad to me when a player gets ridiculed for using a Cork Bat. But yet that same player could be using steriods and they would look past that But Oh No he used a cork bat. It was prob an Accident. But w/e In the end Steriods are stupid and i think itswrecking the good game of baseball.


"Whos more of the fool,the fool or the fool who follows". Obi-Wan Kenobi

Brent M.

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Not that I want to say goodbye small markets, but there are other options too. We've expanded north, but more players are still coming in from the south. What about Mexico City and other large Mexican cities? What about San Juan? Caracas and Havana would be ideal down the road if political situations changed.

You realize, Rich, how painful it is for those in the D.C. area to hear you advocate for Mexico City and San Jaun -- while the nation's capital sits idle, waiting, and waiting, and waiting (and begging...) for a team.

I'm not much of a baseball fan, but the situation has become completely absurd. Peter Angelos and his Baltimore Orioles hold all the cards, so D.C. just has to go without.

D.C.'s mayor, Anthony Williams, just proposed a new publicly financed stadium (a story broken by ... are you ready for this, Alan?? ... the Washington Times!), but City Council members received the news cooly, and even if they hadn't, Bud Selig would still be Angelos' lapdog.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Man ive got this great picture of Barry Bonds. But for some reason it wont work when i try to post it. But man you should see this pic, Its Bonds Rookie card haha the guy is like 4 times the size now adays.

Dude! The man is 40. We were ALL pushing multiples of our rookie cards at 40. Just you wait and see. 8)

Christian: What was the phrase? Um, "First in the eyes of his countrymen and last in the American League." D.C. never was the baseball town that the Hill seems to think it is. I don't know, man.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Rich Kennedy Wrote: Dude! The man is 40. We were ALL pushing multiples of our rookie cards at 40. Just you wait and see.

Haha true i guess i never thought of it i that way;But still the presence of steriods is there.

I dont know i'm just really against steriods. I dont think super stars should have to take steriods; I would love to know how many high paid super stars in any League (MLB,NHL,NBA) Take steriods. It would be intresting to see how many there is out there.

I would really like to find a web page that can get into real good detail about the use of steriods. If anybody here knows of such site please pass on the link.


"Whos more of the fool,the fool or the fool who follows". Obi-Wan Kenobi

Brent M.

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That's a good one, Rich -- only most of us aren't packing extra bulk that's useful. I think the records of Willie Mays and Hank Aaron are more typical, showing a notable decline in production during the latter years of their careers.


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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You've known me long enough Andrew. I go for the good line when I can. But I really do agree with you guys about the "enhancements" of all types. I really do think Bonds has been the complete ballplayer too. I was devastated to read of this personal trainer of his. I'm afraid that baseball is going to sit on this a while like the NFL did before Alzado's death. Baseball, while not as bad as Boxing in its see no evil policy, has from the beginning done little to solve its scandals. Anyone who has read some Bill Veeck know's that 1)Landis was not much of a solution in the long run, and 2) that the lords of baseball were not very clean themselves at the time of the Black Sox Scandal. In other words, it always has been thus.

Edited by Rich Kennedy

"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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As to Bonds' status as a complete ballplayer:

Gentlemen, the guy is hitting in the .570's! NOBODY kisses .600 for this long. With a third of his appearances being walks. How can steroids (and I'm not saying he has not taken them) help him with this? This takes patience and control, two things disturbed by steroids.

"Stoney and Wojo" on WDFN, the local sportstalk station have asked today, What do you want? Should Barry destroy Ruth and Aaron (Ruth at least this year), or should he try for .400? What do y'all think?


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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You realize, Rich, how painful it is for those in the D.C. area to hear you advocate for Mexico City and San Jaun -- while the nation's capital sits idle, waiting, and waiting, and waiting (and begging...) for a team.

I'm not much of a baseball fan, but the situation has become completely absurd. Peter Angelos and his Baltimore Orioles hold all the cards, so D.C. just has to go without.

D.C.'s mayor, Anthony Williams, just proposed a new publicly financed stadium (a story broken by ... are you ready for this, Alan?? ... the Washington Times!), but City Council members received the news cooly, and even if they hadn't, Bud Selig would still be Angelos' lapdog.

Hey Christian: I just was looking over the MLB power rankings at ESPN.com and the old last place Expo's had as their blurb the fact that D.C.'s mayor is talking with Selig to bring them to that stadium you mentioned. Just what need, ther reincarnation of The Senators.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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That's right, and I was gonna gloat about the news, which is several days old. But... there's still a catch to the deal, and it involves Peter Angelos. So I wouldn't hold my breath that the Expos will be coming to D.C.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Yeah, I know about the Baltimore veto. Congress can always threaten MLB's anti-trust exemption. I'd think that such a weak organisation would be a fear, though.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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