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2004 Reading Journals


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Well, I'm quite lazy... so I didn't really read much the last year... and because I felt some kind of nostalgia to my childhood, some of the books I read were children and youth books...

- "Kaddish for a Child Not Born", Imre Kertesz (not easy to read, but worth it! I read it twice!)

- "David Copperfield", Dickens

- "Quo Vadis", Henriyk Sienkiewicz

- "Galileo's Daughter", Dava Sobel

- "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", Twain

- "The Rage and the Pride", Oriana Fallaci (about the Muslim terror)

- A poesy book by the excellent Polish poet

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January

Worship by the Book edited by D.A. Carson

Worship in Spirit and Truth by John Frame

February

Ancient-Future Faith by Robert E. Webber

March

Emerging Worship by Dan Kimball

April

Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller

Unceasing Worship by Harold Best

The Emerging Church by Dan Kimball

May

Bible Doctrine by Wayne Grudem

Making Sense of Church by Spencer Burke

June

The Illumani by Larry Burkett

July

Prophet by Frank Peretti

Reel Spirituality by Robert K. Johnston

What We Saw by Various Authors (Compiled by CBS News)

The Christian Culture Survival Guide by Matthew Paul Turner

August

Article:The Marks of a Spiritual Leader by John Piper

How to Give Away Your Faith by Paul Little + Marie Little

September

Communicating For Life by Quentin Schultze

Overcoming Walls to Witnessing by Timothy K. Beougher

October

Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller

November

Currently Reading:

The 9/11 Commission Report by the 9/11 Commission

Knowing Jesus Through the Old Testament by Christopher J.H. White

Finished:

from Postlude to Prelude by C. Randall Bradley

A Pastor's Sketches by Ichabod Spencer

Edited by Clint M
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Finished

Books for Class

Worship by the Book edited by D.A. Carson

Worship in Spirit and Truth by John Frame

Hmmmm. I checked the "About You" thread, Clint, and saw that you're a student at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Is Southeastern a Reformed Baptist seminary? I didn't think it was, but both Frame and Carson are distinctly Reformed, correct? (I know Frame is paedobaptist, although Carson may be a Reformed Baptist; can't recall his background).

Bible Doctrine by Wayne Grudem

...

All God's Children and Blue Suede Shoes by Kenneth Meyers

There you go again! smile.gif

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Currently Reading

"Stange Virtues: Ethics in a Multicultural World" by Bernard T. Adeney

Recent Reads

Listening to the Spirit in the Text by Gordon Fee.

The Scattered Voice: Christians at Odds in the Public Square by James W. Skillen

Political Visions & Illusions: A Survey and Christian Critique of Contemporary Ideologies by David Koyzis

Epistemology: Becoming Intellectually Virtuous (Contours of Christian Philosophy) by Jay W. Wood

And Marries Another: Divorce and Remarriage in the Teaching of the New Testament by Craig Keener

Does God Have a Future?: A Debate on Divine Providence by Christopher A. Hall, John Sanders

False Intimacy: Understanding the Struggle of Sexual Addiction by Harry W. Schaumburg

A Primer on Postmodernism by Stanley J. Grenz

Brandon

"God is so great and merciful that he does not require that we name him precisely. God is even willing to be anonymous for a time. Remember how God led the Three Wise Men from the East to Christ? The Wise Men did not know the God of Israel or Jesus. They worshipped the stars. So God used a star to lure them."--The Twelve Steps for Christians

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Current reads

Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, Harold Bloom

An Encyclopedia of the Violin, Alberto Bachmann (published in 1925; Bachmann was a student of Ysaye; reports the sale of a Stradivarius for the shocking sum of $60,000)

Recent reads

The Master of Ballantrae, The Black Arrow, Stevenson

The Magician's Nephew, Lewis

The Eyes of the Killer Robot, John Bellairs

The Prince and the Pauper, Letters from the Earth, Pudd'nhead Wilson, Twain

The Arab Mind, Raphael Patai

Music through the Eyes of Faith, Harold M. Best

New Way to Be Human, Charlie Peacock

The Better Angel: Walt Whitman in the Civil War, Roy Morris, Jr.

Something That Lasts, James D. Jordan*

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky

Krakatoa, The Meaning of Everything, Simon Winchester

Staying Sane in the Arts by an Irish gentleman whose name eludes me for the moment

Wisdom for Today's Decisions, ?*

Future reads

New Paths in Muslim Evangelism, Phil Parshall. Library discard; recent events may cast a different light on things, but then again they may not. Looks intriguing at any rate.

*Titles from my moonlighting gig as an editor for a Christian "vanity press." These books range from modestly engaging to abjectly awful, but to find out which are which, you'll have to read them yourself.

Edited by mrmando

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

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Finished

Books for Class

Worship by the Book edited by D.A. Carson

Worship in Spirit and Truth by John Frame

Hmmmm. I checked the "About You" thread, Clint, and saw that you're a student at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Is Southeastern a Reformed Baptist seminary? I didn't think it was, but both Frame and Carson are distinctly Reformed, correct? (I know Frame is paedobaptist, although Carson may be a Reformed Baptist; can't recall his background).

Southern Baptist Seminary is where I'm at. They do teach Reformed/Calvinistic theology (which has been a refreshing change for me - much of the Armenism I was taught in college left me waining). Frame is Reformed to the core, but he's a conservative Presbyterian. :wink: Carson's reformed, although he's considered semi-moderate among many at school.

Bible Doctrine by Wayne Grudem

...

All God's Children and Blue Suede Shoes by Kenneth Meyers

There you go again! smile.gif

Books for class, eh? :wink: Bible Doctrine is for my overview of systematic theology class. It's a condensed version of Grudem's Systematic Theology, and it's a little simplistic for my tastes, but I'm learning some new things. I'll get to the Meyers next month, I've got to get through Hustad's True Worship and Dan Kimball's Emerging Worship first.

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Does God Have a Future?: A Debate on Divine Providence by Christopher A. Hall, John Sanders

How was that book? I thought about picking it up at our recent school book sale, but I wasn't sure if it was a good pick or not.

Actually, I found the book to be a really good read. Hall and Sanders show a maturity that should take place around hot button debates such as that which is covered in this book on the sovereignty of God. In this book, the debate came out as a tie, IMHO. Sanders may have come out a little a head.

I frequent Greg Boyd's (an open theist) message board as well as visited him last year. Clark Pinnock is a personal acquaintance of mine (I've edited some stuff for him on his response to ETS) as well. Boyd is probably the most CONSISTENT open theist (OT) while Pinnock asks, "How far shall we unravel this thing?" (God's sovereignty). That is, that Boyd takes OT to its logical end. With Pinnock you can see some inconsistency where he doesn't go as far as Boyd. Also, there are definitely things with OT that I agree with i.e. the "mystery" of why bad things happen is not due to God's "hidden purposes" but rather to the complexity of creation. I don't think there is a "blue-print" for creation in the sense that everything is happening the way that it is suppose to be i.e. the way God planned it from eternity past. I also believe the cosmos is such that indeterminacy (chaos) and parameters co-exist i.e. chaos theory. Hence, God doesn't micromanage his universe. Personally, I would have a hard time following Reformed teaching in this area in the way that I described above. What's your take on this? We may have to move this discussion over to the "Theology" thread. :walking:

Brandon

"God is so great and merciful that he does not require that we name him precisely. God is even willing to be anonymous for a time. Remember how God led the Three Wise Men from the East to Christ? The Wise Men did not know the God of Israel or Jesus. They worshipped the stars. So God used a star to lure them."--The Twelve Steps for Christians

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It seems this is no longer a journals-only list.

Hmmm. Perhaps we should start a new thread for the new year, like we do with film and music.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 month later...

Recent Reads

Jeeves in the Offing - P.G. Wodehouse

The Great Taos BAnk Robbery - Hillerman

Gettysburg - Gingrich (yes, that one)

The Fixer - Malamud

Present Reads

John Quincy Adams - Hecht

Southern Lady, Yankee Spy

(the biography of Elizabeth Van Lew) - Varon

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  • 4 months later...

I'll play.

Read:

To the Dust Returned by Ray Bradbury. Loved it.

Perdido Street Station by China Mieville. This is the most unique fantasy book I've read in years.

Minority Report and Other Stories by Phillip K. Dick.

Recently Read:

Kushiel's Dart by Jacqueline Cary. Great characters and plot. A bit heavy on the sex, but it's for the good of the character-developement. Never seems gratuitous, just a word of warning for those of us who struggle with our thought life.

Feed by M.T. Anderson. Rips off A Clockwork Orange in some ways, but a great commentary on our information overloaded society and a decent teen love story to boot.

Tartuffe by Moliere. I'm directing this for our senior play. Richard Wilbur rhyming translation. I love this play.

The Princess Bride by S. Morgenstern, abridged by William Goldburg wink.gif I love the movie, but I so wish I had read this before seeing it. I hate the end though (Goldburg invents a first chapter to a sequel and includes it, but it's so good I want to read the rest of that *nonexistant* sequel).

Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk Read and critique my review!

Reading:

The Number 1 Lady's Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith

assorted essays by my english students smile.gif

To read:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time by Mark Haddon

Lyoness by Jack Vance.

Don't Waste Your Life by John Piper

Edited by solishu

Scott -- 2nd Story -- Twitter

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my favourite books of recent memory are

seymour an introduction, franny and zooey,

for esme with love and squalor jd salinger

american pastoral philip roth

hey nostradamus douglas coupland

slaughter house 5 kurt vonnegut

vernon god little. can't remember author's name!

the great divorce cs lewis

mrs dalloway virginia woolf

life of pi yann martel

ever after, and waterland Graham Swift

golden gate Vikram Seth

haroun and the sea of stories Salman Rushdie

the master and margarita Mikhail Bulgakov

mmmmlists.

But here there is no light/Save what from the heavens is with the breezes blown

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Just finished Diary of a Country Priest by Georges Bernanos. It's almost the perfect example of Faith and the Arts, profund, moving, tough-minded, the best exploration of spirituality I've ever read. I recommend it very highly and think it would be ideal for a lot of the people who post on this site. Also read My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk which is superb. Am currently reading Non-Fiction by Chuck Palahniuk which is a pretty hit and miss collection of journalism and not much good really. Other recent books which impressed me were The Summer Game by Roger Angell (collection of baseball writing) and Saving The Appearances by Owen Barfield (Difficult but well worth the effort examination of the history of spiritual consciousness). Mean to start Silent Joe by T Jefferson Parker which I'm told is an absolutely outstanding crime novel.

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Recently/on the go items (when not wasting time online):

On religion - John D Caputo

The Foucault Reader - Michel Foucault

Commentary on Genesis 39-50 - Westermann (hey, loads of fun)

Random bits of Hebrews

White City Blue - Tim Lott

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just now

Stardust by Neil Gaiman

How to Be Good by Nick Hornby

The Poetry Home Repair Manual by Ted Kooser

Now

Straight Man by Richard Russo

A History of the Wife by Marilyn Yalom

Abelard's Love by Luise Rinser, trans. Jean M. Snook

Now (again)

Amazing Grace by Kathleen Norris

If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor

Still

The Brothers Karamozov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Next

Truth and Beauty by Ann Patchett

Mudhouse Sabbath by Lauren Winner

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ha! sally, you seem to read in exactly the same way i do--all at once, as though the world may end before you've had the chance to get to that one novel. smile.gif

i've been trying to keep it to one book at a time these days, though.

just finished: the moviegoer by walker percy

currently reading: out of africa by isak dinesen

next on the docket: eyes wide open by bill romanowski (again, for work) and the brothers karamazov by dostoevsky (my third crack at it--i'm determined to get past page 90 this time!)

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Recently I have read:

Blankets by Craig Thompson

The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett

Currently I am reading Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller

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I'm reading Blue Like Jazz as well. It's hailed as Traveling Mercies with testosterone. I've JUST begun it, but I'd love to hear what others think. My headmaster (boss) read it and said it had me written all over it.

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I'm reading Blue Like Jazz as well. It's hailed as Traveling Mercies with testosterone. I've JUST begun it, but I'd love to hear what others think. My headmaster (boss) read it and said it had me written all over it.

i wasn't a fan. the guy is clearly very young, with a bit too much bluster and a few too many unthinkingly misogynistic comments doubling as humor for my tastes. "traveling mercies" doesn't seem to me to be an accurate comparison, as lamott was significantly wizened by actual difficult life experiences by the time she wrote it. he's also not as funny as lamott. wink.gif i'm sure donald miller is a nice guy, but i just wasn't that interested in what he had to say about life and faith. it didn't ring true for me.

this is all opinion, of course.

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have just started anna karenina, by tolstoy - not sure why, but it seems quite good after 40 pages. only another 388999 to go.

...the brothers karamazov by dostoevsky (my third crack at it--i'm determined to get past page 90 this time!)

man, you've gotta finish this one, it really is up to it's reputation. in fact, i'm changing my signature in honour of it.

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he's also not as funny as lamott.  i'm sure donald miller is a nice guy, but i just wasn't that interested in what he had to say about life and faith. it didn't ring true for me.

Agreed. Plus, Miller had a Christian publisher, so he couldn't say 's***' or 'f***' like Lamott. I thought the multiple references to "dealing with my crap" or "laying out all my crap" were begging to be profanity. I was also disturbed by his refusal to use contractions, even in dialogue.

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RECENTLY FINISHED

Travelling Mercies, Lamott

Ten Little Indians, Sherman Alexie

The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri

READING

Ficciones, Jose Luis Borges

The New Journalism, ed. Tom Wolfe

Vintage Didion (various Joan Didion essay compilation)

Interpreter of Maladies, Jhumpa Lahiri

Edited by joel
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