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Incidentally, re: the transition from Enoch's prophecy of fire to Noah's vision of water, did you see the comment I made at my blog, regarding what this might signify? Is it a sign that God is already pointing in a more lenient/merciful direction than he did before? Or might it be a sign that an even more ultimate judgment awaits beyond the judgment that Noah lived through?

 

I didn't see your comment. But I lean toward the second interpretation: A judgment by fire has been in the cards from the outset, and it hasn't gone anywhere. Of course, that's interpreting the story in light of subsequent revelation.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

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Glenn Beck says it should be called "The Babylonian Chainsaw Massacre." He also said, "It’s more take ‘Sinbad the Sailor’ meets ‘The Shining’ and ‘Friday the 13th,’ with a sprinkle of ‘Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome.’”

 

Somehow, he thinks that's a bad thing.

 

The article contains a few spoilers, BTW.

It's the side effects that save us.
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Beck's insinuation that "prophets of God" are "nice, gentle" is weirdly condescending. With friends like these...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Why are we discussing Glenn Beck's opinion? We should move on - there are a lot of interesting things to discuss.

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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Well, I read Beck's review, and he represents the experience he authentically had, that I do not doubt a lot of people are going to have, if they are not adequately prepared. 

 

"Rock people." 

 

This alone elicited guffaws within his group.

 

What if they were prepared for this, instead of having it shrouded by spoiler tags?  What if they were referred to those early verses of Genesis 6, as well as edumacate folks about the other sources behind Aranofsky/Handel's screenplay? Some of you are doing this, but the marketing department for the film itself is not.

Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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Part three of my exclusive interview with Aronofsky and Handel, in which we talk about "biblical accuracy" (involves one spoiler from the third act) and the blending of ancient and modern cosmologies and other science-y stuff. I also asked a question about a theme that seems to run through all of Aronofsky's films, and he said he preferred not to answer those kinds of questions because he tries not to be too "conscious" of whatever it is that might link his films.

 

Three new videos, including a clip of Tubal-Cain rallying his troops and a featurette on the CGI animals.

 

Nick Alexander wrote:

: "Rock people." 

: This alone elicited guffaws within his group.

 

How a Mormon can mock Jewish mythology is beyond me, really.

 

Admittedly, I'm not aware of any Jewish tradition about the fallen angels being covered in rock, per se. (And that's certainly not how the Watchers are portrayed in the graphic novel.) But still.

 

Nick Alexander wrote:
: What if they were prepared for this, instead of having it shrouded by spoiler tags?  What if they were referred to those early verses of Genesis 6, as well as edumacate folks about the other sources behind Aranofsky/Handel's screenplay? Some of you are doing this, but the marketing department for the film itself is not.

 

I agree, the marketing department has been very, very coy about certain aspects of this film, *especially* where the Watchers/Nephilim are concerned. (There are even shots in the trailers that don't have Nephilim that *do* have Nephilim when you see those shots in the finished film.) But you can't blame Aronofsky for that: he has mentioned the Nephilim quite a bit via his Twitter account over the course of making this film.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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: "Rock people." 

: This alone elicited guffaws within his group.

 

How a Mormon can mock Jewish mythology is beyond me, really.

 

Admittedly, I'm not aware of any Jewish tradition about the fallen angels being covered in rock, per se. (And that's certainly not how the Watchers are portrayed in the graphic novel.) But still.

 

In all fairness to Beck (I happen to be friends with his devoutly Catholic father-in-law), (1) he went from no religion to a Mormon convert, and (2) I think most Mormons (as well as most Christians) are simply unaware of Jewish mythology, specifically that of which is extra-Biblical.  It is a blind spot. He is likely to state that this is a screenplay invention rather than based on something more substantive.

 

Speaking of conservative radio talk show mavens, the review to seek out is that of Michael ("Hollywood vs America") Medved.  Curious to hear this orthodox Jew's take.

 

ETA: corrected Medved's book title.

Edited by Nick Alexander

Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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Part three of my exclusive interview with Aronofsky and Handel, in which we talk about "biblical accuracy" (involves one spoiler from the third act) and the blending of ancient and modern cosmologies and other science-y stuff. I also asked a question about a theme that seems to run through all of Aronofsky's films, and he said he preferred not to answer those kinds of questions because he tries not to be too "conscious" of whatever it is that might link his films.

 

Really, really enjoying this interview Peter. Great questions, great answers.

 

This bit stood out...

 

Noah being 600 years old, Shem being 98 or so?

 

AH: Here’s my answer to that. A lot of the patriarchs are very long-lived, and you can look at how to look at that. Noah dies at 950, and he has kids at around 500, the Flood comes at around 600, so he’s about– When he has those kids, he is at about five-ninths or 50 percent of his lifespan. So at about this time he should be middle-aged. And if his kid is 100 years old and you’re going to live to be about 1000, then you’re about 10 years old.

 

DA: One tenth.

 

AH: It never says in there that they get to be 100 and they just get more and more and more and more wrinkly. They lived a long time, maybe they aged slower too.

 

DA: Maybe the earth was spinning faster around the sun.

 

I was wondering if you were going to bring that up!

 

DA: Why not, though? I mean, what is a year? What is a year? How do you define a year?

 

...because I just recently heard this Radiolab Podcast about how our years used to be shorter:

 

With the help of paleontologist Neil Shubin, reporter Emily Graslie and the Field Museum's Paul Mayer we discover that our world is full of ancient coral calendars. Each one of these sea skeletons reveals that once upon a very-long-time-ago, years were shorter by over forty days.

Edited by Darryl A. Armstrong

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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...because I just recently heard this Radiolab Podcast about how our years used to be shorter:

 

With the help of paleontologist Neil Shubin, reporter Emily Graslie and the Field Museum's Paul Mayer we discover that our world is full of ancient coral calendars. Each one of these sea skeletons reveals that once upon a very-long-time-ago, years were shorter by over forty days.

 

 

That episode was amazing.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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: "Rock people." 

: This alone elicited guffaws within his group.

 

How a Mormon can mock Jewish mythology is beyond me, really.

 

Admittedly, I'm not aware of any Jewish tradition about the fallen angels being covered in rock, per se. (And that's certainly not how the Watchers are portrayed in the graphic novel.) But still.

 

In all fairness to Beck (I happen to be friends with his devoutly Catholic father-in-law), (1) he went from no religion to a Mormon convert, and (2) I think most Mormons (as well as most Christians) are simply unaware of Jewish mythology, specifically that of which is extra-Biblical.  It is a blind spot. He is likely to state that this is a screenplay invention rather than based on something more substantive.

 

Speaking of conservative radio talk show mavens, the review to seek out is that of Michael ("Hollywood vs Religion") Medved.  Curious to hear this orthodox Jew's take.

 

No Movieguide review yet. Hm. 

 

Here are some Movieguide interviews with Aronofsky and the cast, with the interviewer asking about the actors' personal religious views and the actors for the most part politely deflecting:

http://www.movieguide.org/interviews/exclusive-noah-interviews.html

 

The other Noah-related pieces that Movieguide has up are an idiotic comparison of Noah to Duck Dynasty, and "Noah vs. Al Gore," an opinion piece which asserts that global warming is nothing to worry about, because God's gonna destroy the world with fire anyway, and among the benefits of the new earth will be no more "F" words or R-rated movies. 

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

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It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

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...because I just recently heard this Radiolab Podcast about how our years used to be shorter:

 

With the help of paleontologist Neil Shubin, reporter Emily Graslie and the Field Museum's Paul Mayer we discover that our world is full of ancient coral calendars. Each one of these sea skeletons reveals that once upon a very-long-time-ago, years were shorter by over forty days.

 

 

That episode was amazing.

 

 

It was. And off I went down a rabbit trail...

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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The fourth and final part of my interview with Darren Aronofsky and Ari Handel begins with me saying "One last question..." and then goes on for another 1,700+ words, touching on themes like midrash (yes, again!), antediluvian vegetarianism, and whether a film can be entertaining and prophetic at the same time. Oh, and I also brought up the subject of source criticism.

 

A round-up of recent interviews with Aronofsky in print, radio and video.

 

My article for CT Movies on the Noah-movie genre, if such a thing exists, and how this film resembles and differs from its predecessors.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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My latest in-depth Noah piece: an analysis of various controversies and questions around the film. 

 

The punning headlines write themselves: “Noah Awash in Flood of Controversy.” “Deluge of Criticism Inundates Filmmakers.” In the weeks preceding the release of Noah, controversy has swirled around the film — and will no doubt continue to do so in the weeks ahead.

 

Does Noah replace the biblical theme of judgment of sin with environmental themes? Is Noah a radical environmentalist? Does the movie mention God at all? Is the director an atheist? Why are there giant rock monsters? And so on.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Barbara Nicolosi is now the Catholic Armond White.

She isn't content to bash Noah, which would be totally within the pale. I love a good nasty review too, even of movies I like. But no. Barbara has to be the one righteous voice among liars and whores. This "review" makes her the Catholic Armond White. And as with the real Armond White, I have nothing more to say to her or about her, until/unless she apologizes.

I won't link to her review, but I guess you can find it if you want to.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Aronofsky on "dominion" vs "stewardship" and how the Exxon Valdez spill inspired his take on the Nephilim.

 

The poem that started it all (and some amusing comments from Aronofsky's former 7th-grade teacher).

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I've been going to bat on disproving the "no mention of God meme" at Big Hollywood.  And somebody wrote this:

 

Actually I just got back from seeing it Nick, that line is nowhere in the movie. He says "My father says there can be no king, there is only The Creator". Sorry to burst your bubble but you should go see the movie first before you comment on such nonsense.

 

Help me PTC and SDG.  You're my only hope.

Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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I read her review.  Glenn Beck ought to sue for plagiarism.

 

 

“Wow. The secular critics hate Christians this much. They hate the Christians so much, that they will rave about this piece of crap because they think the Christians are going to hate it for ideological reasons.”

 

It takes a gargantuan ego and deeply irrational cynicism to accuse anyone who has good words for Noah of hypocrisy, cowardice, sycophantism, slavish agenda-pushing or hatred of Christians.

 

I enjoyed her list of extremely improbable occurrences but the rest of the review depressed me a lot.    

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I've been going to bat on disproving the "no mention of God meme" at Big Hollywood.  And somebody wrote this:

 

Actually I just got back from seeing it Nick, that line is nowhere in the movie. He says "My father says there can be no king, there is only The Creator". Sorry to burst your bubble but you should go see the movie first before you comment on such nonsense.

 

Help me PTC and SDG.  You're my only hope.

 

I've heard that line THREE TIMES. Peter has heard it twice. The line is "The Creator is God." 

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Yes. I wrote another Noah piece: Noah: A Theological Reflection, for Catholic World Report. Don't ask me why.
 
(A few paragraphs will be familiar, as I plagiarized comments earlier in the thread for this piece.) 
 

Our crisis is not unlike that of Noah and his family in the film: religious and cultural castaways in an increasingly secularized culture, seeking to lead a righteous life and raise righteous children in spite of the world around us. Surrounded by the rapacious civilization founded by Cain, Noah and his family live as nomads apart—antediluvian preppers living off the grid, as it were. At one point Noah notes with concern that his son Ham (Logan Lerman) seems “a little too curious” about a group of lawless men they encountered. “He had to see it sometime,” Noah’s wife Naamah (Jennifer Connelly) points out. It’s a strikingly contemporary exchange.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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