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Brent_Dude33

Best Star Wars Movie?

What is your Favorite Star Wars Movie?  

43 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your Favorite Star Wars Movie?

    • Episode I: The Phantom Menace
      0
    • Episode II: Attack Of The Clones
      0
    • Episode IV: A New Hope
      11
    • Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
      24
    • Episode VI: Return Of The Jedi
      3


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I personaly every day am in conflict in which Star Wars i like the best. I will have to go with.... A New Hope, I really do like it. I think it's prob my fav because it was the first one i saw and has always stuck in my head as being Star Wars.

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Anders   

Hey dude excl.gif

Good idea putting this poll in Leftovers. Some of the guys tend to get a little touchy if when one acts too "fanboy-ish", but that's understandable given the nature of the site. I encourage reading lots of the stuff in main forums, even if you have nothing to contribute because you will learn a lot.

That said, THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK is and shall remain my favorite film of all time. The original STAR WARS is great, but ESB takes the whole mythos to a new level, expanding it and making it what it is today.

In addition it has amazing cinematography, FX, score and some of the coolest locals of any film. Also it has the most Yoda and Vader of any of the films, which can't hurt.

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Guest Russell Lucas   
Guest Russell Lucas

Any poll without The Star Wars Holiday Special and Turkish Star Wars an incomplete poll is.

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Clint M   
Empire Strikes Back by far. The only movie where Lucas left both the script and the direction to someone else. (Yes, he wrote it, but not the actual film dialogue - which is the best of any SW movie).

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Anders   

Just out of curiousity Russell, have you actually seen the "Star Wars Holiday Special"?

I've seen bits and pieces of it, and actually liked the cartoon that introduced Boba Fett, but the rest of it... blink.gif

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Russell Lucas wrote:

: . . . The Star Wars Holiday Special . . .

This I have. Oh, what an ordeal it was to watch it all the way through. I was shocked that Lucas actually admitted its existence on the Episode II DVD bonus features, i.e. in the feature detailing the origins of Boba Fett.

: . . . Turkish Star Wars . . .

Eh?

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I actually had a chance to see the Star Wars holiday special about a year ago. I have to say it was kind of neat but only because of Boba Fett. Other than that it was really hard to wactch. It reminded me of that one star wars reunion comic run wink.gif It was hard to read just as the Christmas special was hard to watch. blink.gif

I just watched A New Hope tonight and i'm hopeing some time soon to watch Empire. I'm actually hopeing to have a Star Wars movie night then i shall watch all three in one night something i have yet to accomplish with out falling a sleep during Jabbas palace.

On another note has anybody read The Tales Of The Jedi comic run. It includes Titles like The Sith War, Golden Age Of The Sith, Knights Of The Old Republic.

I'm just wondering. unsure.gif

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Thom   

This was a difficult decision. Empire almost won out but nostalgia put A New Hope over the top. Bad film analysis, eh?

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From the child:

Star Wars gave me permission to dream, and dream without concern for boundaries.

But Empire---Empire showed me that there are consequences to weigh for such things--and that the good guys don't always win every battle.

Empire it is.

From the adult:

Star Wars was a rough and mighty sword.

Empire honed it to keen perfection and raised it high, challenging all with no takers.

Jedi wielded it for a time, but grew weary and ultimately sold it.

Then Phantom Menace made the kind of copy you hang on your wall and admire, and Attack of the Clones took it down and brandished it with some flashy moves, but carefully avoided making contact with the real thing.

I'm still waiting for the true blade to surface again.

Edited by Jason Bortz

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DanBuck   

From the adult:

Star Wars was a rough and mighty sword.

Empire honed it to keen perfection and raised it high, challenging all with no takers.

Jedi wielded it for a time, but grew weary and ultimately sold it.

Then Phantom Menace made the kind of copy you hang on your wall and admire, and Attack of the Clones took it down and brandished it with some flashy moves, but carefully avoided making contact with the real thing.

I'm still waiting for the true blade to surface again.

That's funny. I felt as though Phantom Menace and Attack took the sword and used it to cut up a pop tart.

Generic!

With no Frosting!

Edited by DanBuck

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From the adult:

Star Wars was a rough and mighty sword.

Empire honed it to keen perfection and raised it high, challenging all with no takers.

Jedi wielded it for a time, but grew weary and ultimately sold it.

Then Phantom Menace made the kind of copy you hang on your wall and admire, and Attack of the Clones took it down and brandished it with some flashy moves, but carefully avoided making contact with the real thing.

Haha Nice way of classing the Star Wars movies. Jason i think your waiting for the Excalibur of Star Wars movies to be pulled from the stone Eh? Episode III, Maybe?

I hope your sword gets pulled out once again my friend.

"Gulp" i liked Phantom and Clones. Clones better than Phantom. (Dont hurt me to much) rolleyes.giftongue.gif

On a side note nice to see this got moved. Kind of felt left out in the leftovers wink.gif

Also good to see A New Hope is keeping up with Empire. Haha i dont think we will ever see a vote for Episode I Or II. dry.gif

Edited by Brent_Dude33

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Anders   

I will stand in solidarity with those who defend the Prequel films.

That said, I still like the original trilogy best, however I have The Phantom Menace on my staff picks at work. Partly because I think it's an underrated film that gets better with each viewing, and also because it sparks some nice controversy. Sitting next to The Last Temptation of Christ, Batman: Mask of the Phantasm and Conan the Barbarian, let's just say I get some people who are really weirded out by my staff picks, but I kinda wanted that. tongue.gif

I actually think that Phantom Menace has some of the best FX work I've seen in ANY film, ever. It's really incredible and people don't give it the credit it deserves. And as for all the those who say they prefer CGI to models, well watch some of the "Making of" documentaries and you'll see that models aren't dead...it's just optical compositing that's dead.

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SDG   

I love all five Star Wars films to date, and while I have a rough hierarchy I don't think I can quite rank them all or pick a number 1.

The Phantom Menace is the first film I ever saw that delivered sci-fi cityscapes and civilizations to rival what I imagined in my mind's eye and saw in my dreams. Plus, the best laser sword fight ever filmed. Still, it's definitely the most flawed of the lot.

Tied at the next level are Return of the Jedi and Attack of the Clones. Both have flaws, but my favorite sequences in all of Star Wars are in these films, including the rescue of Han Solo and the Coruscant sky chase sequence. No other film delivers for me the pure Buck-Rogers / Flash Gordon sci-fi pulp joy of the latter scene, and to a lesser extent the climactic coliseum sequence. And I love the sight of scores of Jedi fighting together. Getting back to Jedi, the redemption of one of cinema's five top villains carries the day for me, and overshadows the extent to which the climax doesn't quite make sense.

Tied at the highest level are Star Wars (or A New Hope) and The Empire Strikes Back. One is sci-fi action fairy tale, the other sci-fi action mythology. Empire is more mature and nuanced, but it's also incomplete, and Star Wars is more joyous and exhilarating. Empire builds on Star Wars and flows over into Return of the Jedi, but Star Wars, despite its chapter numeral, is completely satisfying in and of itself.

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SDG wrote:

: The Phantom Menace . . . the best laser sword fight ever filmed.

I'm still undecided on this point. It's the most intricately choreographed, sure -- but it still seems like CHOREOGRAPHY to me and not so much like a FIGHT.

It's been a couple years since I last watched it, though.

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Anders   

Peter, I think you should go back and watch Phantom Menace again, and forget about the fanboy dissapointments, and remember that Jake Lloyd is just a kid and you might just be pleasantly surprised.

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Must.....resist....

I'll grant that Phantom Menace has the best sabre battle of the lot--Ray Parks was awesome, but then they killed him off in a really stupid manner, like they do all the cool bad guys. Case in point, the nefarious burping Sarlaac pit.

But Jake Lloyd notwithstanding, in hindsight I'm actually grateful for Jar Jar because my ire at his character oversteps my disappointment with the role of the young Anakin and how he was written and directed.

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SDG   

Peter, I think you should go back and watch Phantom Menace again, and forget about the fanboy dissapointments, and remember that Jake Lloyd is just a kid and you might just be pleasantly surprised.

I dunno, Anders. As much as I appreciate The Phantom Menace for what it does, the more I watch it the more its flaws grate on me. A few things currently stuck in my craw:

1. Why does the story have to revolve around something so abstruse as an unspecified dispute trade route taxation and a blockade aimed at resolving the matter we know not how? Look at the basic plot issues in the first three films -- you could explain them to a four-year-old. I have explained them to a four-year-old.

2. Why do the Jedi claim that the Naboo and the Gungans "form a symbiont circle" and that "what affects one must affect the other" when there is zero evidence of this? Given the importance of the idea of symbiosis vis-a-vis the midi-chlorians I can understand wanting to work the theme, but doesn't the importance of the theme make it even more glaring that the concept makes no sense applied to the two populations of Naboo?

3. Why didn't Lucas structure Episode I as a true first episode, as if establishing the mythology of the Jedi and the Force for the first time? Why begin assuming we already know who the Jedi are and how the Force works, etc?

Let me give you a couple of examples of what might have been a very cool opening scene for a completely different movie called Star Wars: Episode I.

Here's one version. It opens on a lonely road in some dark forest world. A timid, rather helpless figure, a peddler or tinker riding in some ramshackle wagon pulled by the equivalent of a team of horses, nervously makes his way along the road, casting furtive glances this way and that. Perhaps he discusses with a companion, an apprentice, rumors of brigands in these parts. Then suddenly there they are, ruffians who drag the old man from his wagon and begin despoiling him of his meager living. Until, of course, the Jedi arrive from nowhere, dramatically putting the villains to flight. Then they could escort the grateful peddler to the nearest town, where the true adventure would begin.

Now here's another idea, maybe a better one. Perhaps it ought to start with spaceships in space, not a scene on the surface of a planet. So how about restaging the above scene as a twist on the opening scene of A New Hope?

Here's the scenario: A small freighter is attacked and boarded by a large space-pirate ship. Only instead of easily overwhelming the traders crewing the freighter, the pirates discover to their dismay that two of the traders are secretly Jedi knights protecting the vessel on the dangerous interstellar route.

By openly quoting the opening scene of A New Hope in this fashion, Lucas could have dramatically emphasized how times changed from Episode I to Episode IV -- in Episode I, the Jedi maintain order and defend small ships from bullying outlaws, but by Episode IV the bullies are the establishment and the Jedi have been banished. How cool would that have been?

Either of these openings would have allowed us to first see the Jedi through the eyes of ordinary individuals like ourselves, thus allowing us to have the proper awe and admiration for them, instead of starting out with us as peers of the Jedi, insiders, initiates.

Edited by SDG

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Anders wrote:

: Peter, I think you should go back and watch Phantom Menace again, and forget

: about the fanboy dissapointments, and remember that Jake Lloyd is just a kid and

: you might just be pleasantly surprised.

The Phantom Menace came out the same year as The Sixth Sense. I don't think the "he's just a kid" defense works AT ALL. Never has, never will.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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SDG   
Agreed.

Now I have to go the other way. Haley Joel Osment is a wunderkind, a mutant, a robot or something. By far most child performers can't be compared with him. Granted that Jake Lloyd is really wince-worthy in places, he's perfectly acceptable in others. And NOBODY (except for Anakin's mother) is doing VERY good acting in Episode I!

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Out of the thousands of kids they looked at, they chose Lloyd.

In comparison with many of the actor-savants discovered over the years at that age, I feel casting could have waited longer, been more selective. But again, it was a no-win situation: he's a poorly written character with no real director to speak of.

I don't really agree with the wunderkind label--I believe it lies upon the director to cull the best performances and eye for how children fare in films. I know as a director it's a matter of patience and invoking within the child some element of the scene they can grasp intellectually as well as emotionally. Kids are often short-changed when it comes to rationalizing with them the intent of the scene and their role in it and encouraging them to pretend after they fully understand 'what it is we're trying to play.'

Lloyd did not strike an evocative chord with me. Not once.

Unfortuntately, neither did MacGregor, Portman, or Neeson, as you point out. So again: Lloyd might have been an okay choice, but he had very little chance to prove it with all the cards stacked against him in the form of 'big picture' directing instead of 'moment by moment' directing.

Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Spielberg achieve 'Osmont-calibre' performances on a nearly regular basis because they're selective in their choices, they work with the kids--and they love 'em.

Not to say Haley-Joel isn't a cut above--he is extraordinary--but there are scores of children out there with the potential to shine just as brightly.

----------

Edited by Jason Bortz

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Anders   

Wow, I'm not saying Llyod is good, but comparisons to Haley way off. Haley was great in Sixth Sense and A.I. but in both cases he's playing eccentric or alien characters. He doesn't seem like a real kid. I have the same complaint about Dakota Fanning. She's just too witty, too jaded for me to buy as a real, NORMAL kid.

However, Jake IS easily the weakest link in the film. And you're right Spielberg is able to cull brilliant child performances film after film so that's no excuse for Lucas. However, Jake wasn't enough to ruin the entire film for me. In fact, regardless of what Jason thought, I think Qui Gon Jinn is one of the best characters in any of the films, originals included. And I even liked Jar Jar Binks for the most part (only thing that really bugged me at all was the fart joke). huh.gif

And as for the story, well I have a feeling that if it were too simplistic people would have complained about that too. NO, it's not perfect, but my opinion is that the film suffered from unatainable expecations, and that in retrospect it's not nearly as awful as some of the detractors have made it out to be. The truth is that Phantom Menace owes more to Hidden Fortress than any of the original films. The idea of a samurai escorting a queen in disguise through a trade blockade, and a couple of bumbling sidekicks who are easily a match for Jar Jar in terms of sheer stupidity. It's really quite uncanny. I wonder how many of those who praise the original film as a "sci-fi Hidden Fortress" have even watched a Kurosawa film before in their lives?

Let me be clear, I'm not blindly defending the film, but it is worth considering that the film isn't clear cut awful as many think. And I like it, so... tongue.gif

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