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MattPage   

I think I finally sussed out the difference between Twitter and (the status aspect of) Facebook. And essentially it's all about the culture of those sites. Facebook is about facilitating existing connections. If one of my friends went around and tried to add all my friends that they have never met to their friends, that would be seen as odd. Whereas, from what I can make out, Twitter is more about developing new relationships. If I go and follow all the people someone I already follow is following that's normal (rather than strange as it would be on Facebook).

FWIW

Matt

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Bill Simmons:

. . . the craziest subplot of the offseason: NBA players using Twitter to break news about themselves, and even stranger, reporters posting their scoops on Twitter even before their employers had a chance to print them. I've said it before, I'll say it again: Facebook is a social network. Twitter is a media/marketing vehicle disguised as a social network. Big difference. And if you don't think it's changing the way information is dispersed, for good and bad, you're insane.

The Tonight Show:

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MattPage   

Hmm interesting that tweets are controversially breaking news in very American sports such as the NBA whilst the same is also happening in cricket and (Association) Football over here. Not that up on the NBA stuff but here we've had an Australian cricketer announcing he was dropped for the match before the team had been announced, and a footballer moaning about wanting to transfer.

Matt

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My dad doesn't talk like this, but I suspect some dads do, and that this Twitter feed is on the up and up.

WARNING: Profanity! Lots of it. I thought twice before posting the link, but the content had me laugh -- and we could all use a laugh, couldn't we? My apologies to those who are offended.

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Diaz & Myers Banned From Twitter

Filmmakers are becoming increasingly worried about actors ruining plots and damaging the industry by putting up messages on the public website.

Executives at Dreamworks have forbidden actors from giving out information on the internet by inserting clauses into their contracts - with Diaz and Myers, who are lined up to star in another Shrek sequel next year, the first affected by the move.

WENN, October 19

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Teens Don't Tweet; Twitter's Growth Not Fueled By Youth

Twitter's footprint has expanded impressively in the first half of 2009, reaching 10.7 percent of all active Internet users in June. Perhaps even more impressively, this growth has come despite a lack of widespread adoption by children, teens, and young adults. In June 2009, only 16 percent of Twitter.com website users were under the age of 25. Bear in mind persons under 25 make up nearly one quarter of the active US Internet universe, which means that Twitter.com effectively under-indexes on the youth market by 36 percent.

Nielsen Wire, July 30

Twitter: No matter what Hollywood thinks, it's totally uncool for kids

When I had a little downtime with this year's Summer Movie Posse, I asked them how they kept up with the buzz about movies. As you might expect, they spent a lot of time online, which gives them a chance to look at trailers or hear word of mouth about upcoming movies on their friends' Facebook pages or sites like Slashfilm.com or Comingsoon.net.

But when I asked whether they kept abreast of things via Twitter, they all looked at me like I was crazy. Rajiv Rao, who's 17, said "I don't know one high schooler that uses Twitter." His friend, Arya Zarifi, also 17, added: "It's something for adults who feel like it makes them hip or something."

Yalda Chalabi, 17, was especially dismissive of actors and celebrities who use Twitter as a self-promotional tool. "I hate it when they say, 'Follow me on Twitter,' as if we're interested in every little thing they have to say," she explained. "It's just an adult thing. Our music teacher kept saying that she would put stuff up for us to follow on Twitter until one day she said, 'OK, who's following me on Twitter?' And no one raised their hand. You keep hearing people talk about it, but I don't know anyone my age that uses it." . . .

Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times, May 4

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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The Twitter Effect: Not to blame for sinking bad Hollywood movies?

It turns out that my teen pals were right. As former New Line marketing chief Gordon Paddison, who's now an indie consultant, put it: "The thing we've found that's actually much more impressive is the amount of people spreading word-of-mouth by texting."

This was confirmed by an OTX research study last September that found that Twitter actually had far less impact than Facebook and MySpace, along with co-worker and family interaction, when it came to spreading the buzz about good or bad movies. . . .

Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times, July 27

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Glenn Kenny:

The film critic Michael Sicinski became aggrieved with me recently; he was upset that I cited a particularly tetchy "tweet" by him, and particularly that I did so after largely ignoring his more serious work. Did he has a right to be aggrieved? Probably; after all, I did preface a prior, similar objection to an observation by Richard Brody by paying Brody a compliment; I might have at least had the common courtesy to acknowledge that Sicinski's tweet was not representative of his larger body of work. On the other hand, as I pointed out, I didn't write Sicinski's tweet; Sicinski wrote it. And I didn't "retweet" it, and bring it to the attention of a larger audience; Karina Longworth did. And that's how Twitter works. And I believe that if one is going to be on Twitter, one ought to understand what's going to happen there. And if you believe that Twitter is now a vital part of the "conversation" about cinema or politics or world events or whatever it is that's your bag, then you ought to get used to a lack of context. In theory, Twitter should work out to being
all about
context (context within context within context), but in practice—the difficulty in following its various conversations being paramount, but that's just for starters—Twitter is turning out to be the ultimate in the context, as they say, of no context. If that's the currency you're going to deal in, then... I am not trying to pile on Michael here; what I mean, finally, it that Twitter is a
dangerous place
.

One thing Kenny doesn't mention here, but could, is that Twitter pretty much actively DISCOURAGES context, because the page for each individual tweet contains none of the buttons that might enable you to toggle back and forth between consecutive tweets, and the URLs for each tweet contain no hint of what the URLs for the previous and successive tweets in those feeds might be. And that's just with regard to the context of a single Twitter account. On top of that, there is ALSO the problem of trying to follow conversations BETWEEN Twitter accounts -- which Kenny DOES allude to, but I think he means it in a present-tense sense, whereas I am thinking of it in more archival terms.

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Persona   

Twittering, tweeting, whatever -- is super-lame.

Glad I finally pronounced it, effectively killing this lame fad.

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Tyler   

I have a ticket to see a conversation with David Letterman and Biz Stone (founder of Twitter) this Friday. I might walk out if they don't limit their responses to 140 characters each.

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I am not a blogger but an esteemed blog commenter.

Similarly, I have a twitter account that I check on my phone where I never post, but I love following bright, informed people. So far I only follow journalists and authors, but I'm willing to break my no celebrity policy if there are any artists of the type we discuss 'round these parts of interest.

Any suggestions?

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Well, one celebrity that I almost always get a chuckle out of is Nathan Fillion (NathanFillion). He does tweet a lot, though. And while he's not a big celebrity per se, Superchunk/Mountain Goats/Jay Farrar drummer Jon Wurster (JonWurster) is an absolute riot.

Don't know if these help!

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Teens Don't Tweet; Twitter's Growth Not Fueled By Youth

Twitter's footprint has expanded impressively in the first half of 2009, reaching 10.7 percent of all active Internet users in June. Perhaps even more impressively, this growth has come despite a lack of widespread adoption by children, teens, and young adults. In June 2009, only 16 percent of Twitter.com website users were under the age of 25. Bear in mind persons under 25 make up nearly one quarter of the active US Internet universe, which means that Twitter.com effectively under-indexes on the youth market by 36 percent.

Nielsen Wire, July 30

Twitter: No matter what Hollywood thinks, it's totally uncool for kids

When I had a little downtime with this year's Summer Movie Posse, I asked them how they kept up with the buzz about movies. As you might expect, they spent a lot of time online, which gives them a chance to look at trailers or hear word of mouth about upcoming movies on their friends' Facebook pages or sites like Slashfilm.com or Comingsoon.net.

But when I asked whether they kept abreast of things via Twitter, they all looked at me like I was crazy. Rajiv Rao, who's 17, said "I don't know one high schooler that uses Twitter." His friend, Arya Zarifi, also 17, added: "It's something for adults who feel like it makes them hip or something."

Yalda Chalabi, 17, was especially dismissive of actors and celebrities who use Twitter as a self-promotional tool. "I hate it when they say, 'Follow me on Twitter,' as if we're interested in every little thing they have to say," she explained. "It's just an adult thing. Our music teacher kept saying that she would put stuff up for us to follow on Twitter until one day she said, 'OK, who's following me on Twitter?' And no one raised their hand. You keep hearing people talk about it, but I don't know anyone my age that uses it." . . .

Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times, May 4

Teens join Twitter to escape parents on Facebook: survey

Teens don't tweet, will never tweet – too public, too many older users. Not cool.

That's been the prediction for a while now, born of numbers showing that fewer than one in 10 teens were using Twitter early on.

But then their parents, grandparents, neighbours, parents' friends and anyone in-between started friending them on Facebook, the social networking site of choice for many — and a curious thing began to happen. . . .

The growing popularity teens report fits with findings from the Pew Internet & American Life Project, a non-profit organization that monitors people's tech-based habits. The migration has been slow, but steady. A Pew survey last July found that 16 per cent of young people, ages 12 to 17, said they used Twitter. Two years earlier, that percentage was just eight per cent. . . .

“The first group to colonize Twitter were people in the technology industry — consummate self-promoters,” says Alice Marwick, a post-doctoral researcher at Microsoft Research, who tracks young people's online habits.

For teens, self-promotion isn't usually the goal. At least until they go to college and start thinking about careers, social networking is, well, social.

But as Twitter has grown, so have the ways people, and communities, use it. . . .

Associated Press, January 30

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My Twitter activity has skyrocketed in the past year, much to my surprise, but Twitter still unnerves me at times. I'd appreciate hearing how others have handled new followers that might make you uncomfortable. In the past week, I had someone -- or some organization/group (I have many non-people following me) -- with a particular viewpoint (according to the person's/group's description) follow me. Within a couple of days, a few more such people followed me.

 

I don't want to get more specific than that -- I assume others here have experienced being followed by people/causes they don't necessarily sign on to -- but am wondering how you handle this. More followers on Twitter is, I suppose, a nice problem to have, but I'm wondering if the groundwork is being laid for other problems. I don't know what I might have tweeted that led to being followed by these folks, but my concern is that future tweets from me might be off-putting to these people/groups. I'm not seeking that out; I'm just saying it could happen.

 

Here's the core issue: I don't want Twitter to turn into a place for fighting and strife the same way my Facebook feed did over the years. Obviously, I'm not fully in control of that. But to the extent I can follow -- and be followed -- by people I know won't be overly hostile toward me and my viewpoints, I'd like to encourage that. So, do I block other people who have followed me but whom I suspect won't like some of what I have to say, even though they liked something I tweeted enough to follow me in the first place? Do I wait for things to become an actual problem rather than an imagined/anticipated problem? Or take some other approach?

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