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Overstreet

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Here's the core issue: I don't want Twitter to turn into a place for fighting and strife the same way my Facebook feed did over the years. Obviously, I'm not fully in control of that. But to the extent I can follow -- and be followed -- by people I know won't be overly hostile toward me and my viewpoints, I'd like to encourage that. So, do I block other people who have followed me but whom I suspect won't like some of what I have to say, even though they liked something I tweeted enough to follow me in the first place? Do I wait for things to become an actual problem rather than an imagined/anticipated problem? Or take some other approach?

 

Nine times out of ten, these people (or non-people) will unfollow you on their own within a few days. Most likely they followed you because you tweeted something remotely relevant to them, or because you're recommended to them through that little sidebar. After they see you're either not tweeting a thousand times a day (and thus not a "influencer," or whatever), or if they don't like what you're saying, they'll bail. Happens to me all of the time.

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Rushmore   

Nine times out of ten, these people (or non-people) will unfollow you on their own within a few days. Most likely they followed you because you tweeted something remotely relevant to them, or because you're recommended to them through that little sidebar. After they see you're either not tweeting a thousand times a day (and thus not a "influencer," or whatever), or if they don't like what you're saying, they'll bail. Happens to me all of the time.

In a related issue, lately I've been followed (and then shortly unfollowed, and sometimes followed more than once, which is when I bring out the block button) by about a dozen Nietzschebots. Apparently Nietzsche-quoting Twitter accounts are popular enough that there are a lot of spammers who think quoting Nietzsche interspersed with spam and cllickbait is a good way to reach their audience.

 

The whole Nietzsche Twitter problem is actually quite interesting. Many of Nietzsche's aphorisms are very well suited to Twitter, and I'd like to think that someone out there is fully taking advantage of that fact. But the most popular Nietzsche account, @NietzscheQuotes, is unsatisfactory: it recycles far too few quotations over and over, and seems to be run by someone who actually spends more time reading Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris, emphasizing cheap potshots at faith and banal encomiums to rationality, which it then spices up with endless reiterations of a few of the juicier statements on the nature of women. Nietzsche-quoting could be much more interesting than this. The other, less legitimate accounts, even the ones that aren't blatantly spam-driven, are even more deficient. I'm considering starting my own Nietzsche account just to fill this void, but in order to do so I would have to go back and supplement my one semester's study of Nietzsche with some serious independent reading and review. Perhaps that would be a plus.

Edited by Rushmore

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